Synchronise HEAD with CABAL branch.
authorGuus Sliepen <guus@tinc-vpn.org>
Sun, 24 Aug 2003 20:38:31 +0000 (20:38 +0000)
committerGuus Sliepen <guus@tinc-vpn.org>
Sun, 24 Aug 2003 20:38:31 +0000 (20:38 +0000)
173 files changed:
AUTHORS
Makefile.am
NEWS
README
THANKS
TODO
acconfig.h [deleted file]
autogen.sh
configure.in
cvsusers
doc/CONNECTIVITY
doc/GNUmakefile [deleted file]
doc/HOWTO [deleted file]
doc/Makefile.am
doc/Makefile.maint [deleted file]
doc/Makefile.summ [deleted file]
doc/NETWORKING
doc/PROTOCOL
doc/SECURITY2
doc/es/.cvsignore [deleted file]
doc/es/Makefile.am [deleted file]
doc/help2man [deleted file]
doc/sample-config/tinc-up
doc/sample-config/tinc.conf
doc/texinfo.tex [deleted file]
doc/tinc.conf.5 [deleted file]
doc/tinc.conf.5.in [new file with mode: 0644]
doc/tinc.texi
doc/tincd.8.in [moved from doc/tincd.8 with 69% similarity]
doc/tincinclude.texi.in [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/Makefile.am
lib/README [deleted file]
lib/avl_tree.c
lib/avl_tree.h
lib/conf.c [deleted file]
lib/connection.c [deleted file]
lib/connection.h [deleted file]
lib/dropin.c
lib/dropin.h
lib/edge.c [deleted file]
lib/error.c [deleted file]
lib/error.h [deleted file]
lib/ethernet.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/fake-gai-errnos.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/fake-getaddrinfo.c [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/fake-getaddrinfo.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/fake-getnameinfo.c [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/fake-getnameinfo.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/getopt.c
lib/gettext.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/graph.c [deleted file]
lib/hash.c [deleted file]
lib/hash.h [deleted file]
lib/hooks.h [deleted file]
lib/ipv4.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/ipv6.h [new file with mode: 0644]
lib/list.c
lib/list.h
lib/logging.c [deleted file]
lib/logging.h [deleted file]
lib/net.h [deleted file]
lib/netutl.c [deleted file]
lib/node.c [deleted file]
lib/node.h [deleted file]
lib/pidfile.c
lib/pidfile.h
lib/rbl.c [deleted file]
lib/rbl.h [deleted file]
lib/subnet.c [deleted file]
lib/subnet.h [deleted file]
lib/utils.c
lib/utils.h
lib/xalloc.h
lib/xmalloc.c
m4/attribute.m4 [new file with mode: 0644]
m4/lzo.m4 [new file with mode: 0644]
m4/malloc.m4
m4/openssl.m4
m4/perl.m4 [deleted file]
m4/realloc.m4
m4/tuntap.m4
m4/zlib.m4
redhat/.cvsignore [deleted file]
redhat/Makefile.am [deleted file]
redhat/README [deleted file]
redhat/tinc [deleted file]
redhat/tinc.spec [deleted file]
src/Makefile.am
src/callbacks.c [deleted file]
src/callbacks.h [deleted file]
src/conf.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/conf.h [moved from lib/conf.h with 53% similarity]
src/connection.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/connection.h [new file with mode: 0644]
src/cygwin/device.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/darwin/device.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/device.h
src/edge.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/edge.h [moved from lib/edge.h with 51% similarity]
src/encr.c [deleted file]
src/encr.h [deleted file]
src/event.c [moved from lib/event.c with 51% similarity]
src/event.h [moved from lib/event.h with 73% similarity]
src/graph.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/graph.h [moved from lib/graph.h with 81% similarity]
src/logger.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/logger.h [new file with mode: 0644]
src/meta.c
src/meta.h
src/mingw/device.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/net.c
src/net.h [new file with mode: 0644]
src/net_packet.c
src/net_setup.c
src/net_socket.c
src/netutl.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/netutl.h [moved from lib/netutl.h with 50% similarity]
src/node.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/node.h [new file with mode: 0644]
src/pokey/.cvsignore [deleted file]
src/pokey/Makefile.am [deleted file]
src/pokey/array.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/array.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/conf.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/connection.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/device.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/graph.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/graph.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/interface.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/interface.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/logging.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/meta.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/meta.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/net.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/net.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/net_packet.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/net_setup.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/net_socket.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/netutl.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/netutl.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/pokey.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/pokey.glade [deleted file]
src/pokey/pokey2.xpm [deleted file]
src/pokey/process.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/process.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol.h [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol_auth.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol_edge.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol_key.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol_misc.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/protocol_subnet.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/route.c [deleted file]
src/pokey/route.h [deleted file]
src/process.c
src/process.h
src/protocol.c
src/protocol.h
src/protocol_auth.c
src/protocol_edge.c
src/protocol_key.c
src/protocol_misc.c
src/protocol_subnet.c
src/raw_socket/device.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/read_conf.c [deleted file]
src/read_conf.h [deleted file]
src/route.c
src/route.h
src/subnet.c [new file with mode: 0644]
src/subnet.h [new file with mode: 0644]
src/tincd.c
system.h
testing [deleted file]

diff --git a/AUTHORS b/AUTHORS
index 4721984..ac4e1a2 100644 (file)
--- a/AUTHORS
+++ b/AUTHORS
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 Main tinc authors:
-Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>
-Ivo Timmermans <itimmermans@bigfoot.com>
+Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>
+Ivo Timmermans <ivo@o2w.nl>
 
 These files are from other sources:
  * lib/pidfile.h and lib/pidfile.c are by Martin Schulze, taken from
index 805c312..8462e68 100644 (file)
@@ -2,16 +2,17 @@
 
 AUTOMAKE_OPTIONS = gnu
 
-SUBDIRS = m4 intl lib src doc po
+SUBDIRS =  m4 lib src doc po
 
-ACLOCAL_AMFLAGS =
+ACLOCAL_AMFLAGS = -I m4 
 
-EXTRA_DIST = system.h COPYING.README depcomp
+EXTRA_DIST = config.rpath mkinstalldirs system.h COPYING.README depcomp
 
 CVS_CREATED = ABOUT-NLS configure aclocal.m4 config.h.in config.guess \
  config.sub install-sh ltconfig ltmain.sh missing mkinstalldirs \
  stamp-h.in m4/Makefile.am ChangeLog po/Makefile.in.in \
- po/tinc.pot src/.libs intl depcomp
+ po/tinc.pot po/*.sed po/*.header po/*.sin po/Rules-quot \
+ src/.libs intl depcomp
 
 ChangeLog:
        cvs2cl -U cvsusers --fsf
@@ -20,6 +21,7 @@ cvs-clean: maintainer-clean
        for f in $(CVS_CREATED) `find . -name Makefile.in` tinc-$(VERSION).tar.gz; do\
          rm -Rf "$$f"; \
        done
+       grep -l gettext `find m4 -type f` | xargs rm -f
 
 deb:
        dpkg-buildpackage -rfakeroot
diff --git a/NEWS b/NEWS
index 0317dd5..4c7c939 100644 (file)
--- a/NEWS
+++ b/NEWS
@@ -1,3 +1,40 @@
+version 1.0.1                Aug 14 2003
+
+* Allow empty lines in config files.
+
+* Fix handling of spaces and backslashes in filenames under native Windows.
+
+* Allow scripts to be executed under native Windows.
+
+* Update documentation, make it less Linux specific.
+
+version 1.0                  Aug  4 2003
+
+* Lots of small bugfixes and code cleanups.
+
+* Throughput doubled and latency reduced.
+
+* Added support for LZO compression.
+
+* No need to set MAC address or disable ARP anymore.
+
+* Added support for Windows 2000 and XP, both natively and in a Cygwin
+  environment.
+
+version 1.0pre8              Sep 16 2002
+
+* More fixes for subnets with prefixlength undivisible by 8.
+
+* Added support for NetBSD and MacOS/X.
+
+* Switched from undirected graphs to directed graphs to avoid certain race
+  conditions and improve scalability.
+
+* Generalized broadcasting and forwarding of protocol messages.
+
+* Cleanup of source code.
+
+
 version 1.0pre7              Apr  7 2002
 
 * Don't do blocking read()s when getting a signal.
diff --git a/README b/README
index d75d7f6..1024d60 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -1,10 +1,10 @@
-This is the README file for tinc version 1.0pre7. Installation
+This is the README file for tinc version 1.0.1. Installation
 instructions may be found in the INSTALL file.
 
-tinc is Copyright (C) 1998-2002 by:
+tinc is Copyright (C) 1998-2003 by:
 
-Ivo Timmermans <itimmermans@bigfoot.com>,
-Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>,
+Ivo Timmermans <ivo@o2w.nl>,
+Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>,
 and others.
 
 For a complete list of authors see the AUTHORS file.
@@ -44,13 +44,19 @@ Some configuration variables have different names now. Most notably "TapDevice"
 should be changed into "Device", and "Device" should be changed into
 "BindToDevice".
 
+Compatibility
+-------------
+
+Version 1.0.1 is compatible with 1.0 and 1.0pre8 but not with older versions
+of tinc.
+
 
 Requirements
 ------------
 
 Since 1.0pre3, we use OpenSSL for all cryptographic functions.  So you
 need to install this library first; grab it from
-http://www.openssl.org/.  We recommend version 0.9.5 or better.  If
+http://www.openssl.org/.  You will need version 0.9.7 or later.  If
 this library is not installed on you system, configure will fail.  The
 manual in doc/tinc.texi contains more detailed information on how to
 install this library.
@@ -60,8 +66,11 @@ library whether or not you plan to enable the compression. You can find it at
 http://www.gzip.org/zlib/. Because of a possible exploit in earlier versions we
 recommand that you download version 1.1.4 or later.
 
-In order to compile tinc, you will also need autoconf, automake, GNU make, m4
-and gettext.
+Since 1.0, the lzo library is also used for optional compression. You need this
+library whether or not you plan to enable compression. You can find it at
+http://www.oberhumer.com/opensource/lzo/.
+
+In order to compile tinc, you will need a GNU C compiler environment.
 
 
 Features
@@ -70,17 +79,7 @@ Features
 This version of tinc supports multiple virtual networks at once. To
 use this feature, you may supply a netname via the -n or --net
 options. The standard locations for the config files will then be
-/etc/tinc/<net>/. Because of this feature, tinc will send packets
-directly to their destinations, instead of to the uplink. If this
-behaviour is undesirable (for instance because of firewalls or other
-restrictions), please use an older version of tinc (I would recommend
-tinc-0.2.19).
-
-In order to force the kernel to accept received packets, the
-destination MAC address will be set to FE:FD:00:00:00:00 upon
-reception. The MAC address of the ethertap or tun/tap interface must
-also be set to this address. See the manual for more detailed
-information.
+/etc/tinc/<net>/.
 
 tincd regenerates its encryption key pairs. It does this on the first
 activity after the keys have expired. This period is adjustable in the
@@ -96,7 +95,7 @@ Since pre5, tinc can operate in several routing modes. The default mode,
 determine the destination of packets. The other two modes, "switch" and "hub",
 allow the tinc daemons to work together like a single network switch or hub.
 This is useful for bridging networks. The latter modes only work properly on
-Linux and FreeBSD.
+Linux, FreeBSD and Windows.
 
 The algorithms used for encryption and generating message authentication codes
 can now be changed in the configuration files. All cipher and digest algorithms
@@ -107,11 +106,17 @@ etcetera.
 Support for routing IPv6 packets has been added. Just add Subnet lines with
 IPv6 addresses (without using :: abbreviations) and use ifconfig or ip (from
 the iproute package) to give the virtual network interface corresponding IPv6
-addresses. Autoconfiguration will not work in router mode. Tunneling IPv6
-packets only works on Linux, FreeBSD and possibly OpenBSD.
-
-It is also possible to make tunnels to other tinc daemons over IPv6 networks.
-In order to enable this feature the option "AddressFamily = any" or
-"AddressFamily = ipv6" must be added to the tinc.conf file. The host
-configuration files should contain IPv6 addresses for the "Address" variables,
-or hostnames which have an AAAA or A6 record.
+addresses. tinc does not provide autoconfiguration for IPv6 hosts, if you need
+it use radvd or zebra. Tunneling IPv6 packets only works on Linux, FreeBSD,
+Windows and possibly OpenBSD.
+
+It is also possible to make tunnels to other tinc daemons over IPv6 networks,
+if the operating system supports IPv6.  tinc will automatically use both IPv6
+and IPv4 when available, but this can be changed by adding the option
+"AddressFamily = ipv4" or "AddressFamily = ipv6" to the tinc.conf file.
+
+Normally, when started tinc will detach and run in the background. In a native
+Windows environment this means tinc will intall itself as a service, which will
+restart after reboots.  To prevent tinc from detaching or running as a service,
+use the -D option.
+
diff --git a/THANKS b/THANKS
index e4cfd6d..cbdc5a5 100644 (file)
--- a/THANKS
+++ b/THANKS
@@ -18,6 +18,14 @@ We would like to thank
  * Armijn Hemel (for being our very own PR manager)
  * Jerome Etienne (for a thorough security analysis of tinc)
  * Mark Glines (for his compression patch) 
+ * Nick Patavalis (RedHat package)
+ * Alessandro Gatti (for helping us support Darwin)
+ * Ivo van Dong (for help during the early versions of tinc)
+ * Jeroen Ubbink (for help testing tinc on Free- and NetBSD)
+ * LarstiQ (for help testing tinc on MacOS/X)
+ * Marc A. Lehmann (for criticism)
+ * Teemu Kiviniemi (for his lzo compression patch)
+ * Flynn Marquardt (for help testing tinc on Solaris 2.6)
 
 for their help, support and ideas.  Thank you guys!
 
diff --git a/TODO b/TODO
index c0f2ee3..d6a6df4 100644 (file)
--- a/TODO
+++ b/TODO
@@ -1,5 +1,3 @@
 TODO LIST
 
-1.0:
-
-* A nice, secure and stable release
+* Think of new things to do.
diff --git a/acconfig.h b/acconfig.h
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ff03326..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,91 +0,0 @@
-/* Define to the name name of this package */
-#undef PACKAGE
-
-/* Define to the version of the package */
-#undef VERSION
-
-/* Define to rpl_malloc if the replacement function should be used.  */
-#undef malloc
-
-/* Define to rpl_realloc if the replacement function should be used.  */
-#undef realloc
-
-/* This is always defined.  It enables GNU extensions on systems that
-   have them.  */
-#if !defined(_GNU_SOURCE)
-# undef _GNU_SOURCE
-#endif
-
-#if !defined(__USE_BSD)
-# undef __USE_BSD
-#endif
-
-
-/* Define to 1 if NLS is requested.  */
-#undef ENABLE_NLS
-
-/* Define as 1 if you have catgets and don't want to use GNU gettext.  */
-#undef HAVE_CATGETS
-
-/* Define as 1 if you have gettext and don't want to use GNU gettext.  */
-#undef HAVE_GETTEXT
-
-/* Define if your locale.h file contains LC_MESSAGES.  */
-#undef HAVE_LC_MESSAGES
-
-/* Define to 1 if you have the stpcpy function.  */
-#undef HAVE_STPCPY
-
-/* For getopt */
-#if HAVE_STDLIB_H
-# define getopt system_getopt
-# include <stdlib.h>
-# undef getopt
-#endif
-
-/* Linux */
-#undef HAVE_LINUX
-
-/* FreeBSD */
-#undef HAVE_FREEBSD
-
-/* OpenBSD */
-#undef HAVE_OPENBSD
-
-/* Solaris */
-#undef HAVE_SOLARIS
-
-/* NetBSD */
-#undef HAVE_NETBSD
-
-/* Define to the location of the kernel sources */
-#undef CONFIG_TINC_KERNELDIR
-
-/* Define to 1 if tun/tap support is enabled and found */
-#undef HAVE_TUNTAP
-
-/* Define to the location of if_tun.h */
-#undef LINUX_IF_TUN_H
-
-/* Define to 1 if support for jumbograms is enabled */
-#undef ENABLE_JUMBOGRAMS
-
-/* Define to 1 if checkpoint tracing is enabled */
-#undef ENABLE_TRACING
-
-/* Define to enable use of old SSLeay_add_all_algorithms() function */
-#undef HAVE_SSLEAY_ADD_ALL_ALGORITHMS
-
-/* Define to 1 if you want to include GCRYPT support */
-#undef USE_GCRYPT
-
-/* Define to 1 if you want to include OpenSSL support */
-#undef USE_OPENSSL
-
-#if defined(USE_GCRYPT) && defined(USE_OPENSSL)
-#  error You can only define one of USE_GCRYPT and USE_OPENSSL
-#endif
-
-#if !defined(USE_GCRYPT) && !defined(USE_OPENSSL)
-#  error You must define exactly one of USE_GCRYPT and USE_OPENSSL
-#endif
index 21a0f4c..ecdd701 100644 (file)
@@ -96,26 +96,14 @@ do
     echo processing $dr
     macrodirs=`sed -n -e 's,AM_ACLOCAL_INCLUDE(\(.*\)),\1,gp' < $coin`
     ( cd $dr
-      aclocalinclude="$ACLOCAL_FLAGS"
-      for k in $macrodirs; do
-       if test -d $k; then
-         if test -f $k/Makefile.am.in; then
-           make -C $k -f Makefile.am.in Makefile.am
-         fi
-          aclocalinclude="$aclocalinclude -I $k"
-       ##else 
-       ##  echo "**Warning**: No such directory \`$k'.  Ignored."
-        fi
-      done
-      touch ChangeLog
       if grep "^AM_GNU_GETTEXT" configure.in >/dev/null; then
        if grep "sed.*POTFILES" configure.in >/dev/null; then
          : do nothing -- we still have an old unmodified configure.in
        else
          echo "Creating $dr/aclocal.m4 ..."
          test -r $dr/aclocal.m4 || touch $dr/aclocal.m4
-         echo "Running gettextize...  Ignore non-fatal messages."
-         echo "no" | gettextize --force --copy
+         echo "Running autopoint..."
+         autopoint --force
          echo "Making $dr/aclocal.m4 writable ..."
          test -r $dr/aclocal.m4 && chmod u+w $dr/aclocal.m4
         fi
@@ -123,8 +111,8 @@ do
       if grep "^AM_GNOME_GETTEXT" configure.in >/dev/null; then
        echo "Creating $dr/aclocal.m4 ..."
        test -r $dr/aclocal.m4 || touch $dr/aclocal.m4
-       echo "Running gettextize...  Ignore non-fatal messages."
-       echo "no" | gettextize --force --copy
+       echo "Running autopoint..."
+       autopoint --force
        echo "Making $dr/aclocal.m4 writable ..."
        test -r $dr/aclocal.m4 && chmod u+w $dr/aclocal.m4
       fi
@@ -132,6 +120,18 @@ do
        echo "Running libtoolize..."
        libtoolize --force --copy
       fi
+      aclocalinclude="$ACLOCAL_FLAGS"
+      for k in $macrodirs; do
+       if test -d $k; then
+         if test -f $k/Makefile.am.in; then
+           make -C $k -f Makefile.am.in Makefile.am
+         fi
+          aclocalinclude="$aclocalinclude -I $k"
+       ##else 
+       ##  echo "**Warning**: No such directory \`$k'.  Ignored."
+        fi
+      done
+      touch ChangeLog
       echo "Running aclocal $aclocalinclude ..."
       aclocal $aclocalinclude
       if grep "^AM_CONFIG_HEADER" configure.in >/dev/null; then
index 1073df9..92cc697 100644 (file)
@@ -1,18 +1,24 @@
 dnl Process this file with autoconf to produce a configure script.
 
-dnl $Id: configure.in,v 1.19 2002/04/28 12:46:25 zarq Exp $
+dnl $Id: configure.in,v 1.20 2003/08/24 20:38:18 guus Exp $
 
+AC_PREREQ(2.57)
 AC_INIT(src/tincd.c)
 AM_INIT_AUTOMAKE(tinc, 1.0-cvs)
 AM_CONFIG_HEADER(config.h)
+AM_MAINTAINER_MODE
 
 dnl Include the macros from the m4/ directory
 AM_ACLOCAL_INCLUDE(m4)
 
+AM_GNU_GETTEXT([external])
+AM_GNU_GETTEXT_VERSION(0.12.1)
+
 # Enable GNU extensions.
 # Define this here, not in acconfig's @TOP@ section, since definitions
 # in the latter don't make it into the configure-time tests.
-AC_DEFINE([_GNU_SOURCE], [__USE_BSD])
+AC_DEFINE([_GNU_SOURCE], 1, [Enable GNU extenstions])
+AC_DEFINE([__USE_BSD], 1, [Enable BSD extensions])
 
 ALL_LINGUAS="nl"
 
@@ -24,66 +30,233 @@ AC_PROG_AWK
 AC_PROG_INSTALL
 AC_PROG_LN_S
 AC_PROG_MAKE_SET
-jm_PERL
-
+AC_PROG_RANLIB
 
 AC_ISC_POSIX
 
 dnl Check and set OS
 
-AC_CANONICAL_HOST
+#AC_CANONICAL_HOST
 
 case $host_os in
   *linux*)
-    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_LINUX)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_LINUX, 1, [Linux])
     [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf linux/device.c src/device.c ]
   ;;
   *freebsd*)
-    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_FREEBSD)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_FREEBSD, 1, [FreeBSD])
     [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf freebsd/device.c src/device.c ]
   ;;
+  *darwin*)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_DARWIN, 1, [Darwin (MacOS/X)])
+    [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf darwin/device.c src/device.c ]
+  ;;
   *solaris*)
-    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_SOLARIS)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_SOLARIS, 1, [Solaris/SunOS])
     [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf solaris/device.c src/device.c ]
   ;;
   *openbsd*)
-    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_OPENBSD)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_OPENBSD, 1, [OpenBSD])
     [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf openbsd/device.c src/device.c ]
   ;;
   *netbsd*)
-    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_NETBSD)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_NETBSD, 1, [NetBSD])
     [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf netbsd/device.c src/device.c ]
   ;;
+  *cygwin*)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_CYGWIN, 1, [Cygwin])
+    [ rm -f src/device.c; ln -sf cygwin/device.c src/device.c ]
+  ;;
+  *mingw*)
+    AC_DEFINE(HAVE_MINGW, 1, [MinGW])
+    [ rm -f src/device.c; cp -f src/mingw/device.c src/device.c ]
+    LIBS="$LIBS -lws2_32"
+  ;;
+  *)
+    AC_MSG_ERROR("Unknown operating system.")
+  ;;
 esac
 
 AC_CACHE_SAVE
 
+if test -d /sw/include ; then
+  CPPFLAGS="$CPPFLAGS -I/sw/include"
+fi
+if test -d /sw/lib ; then
+  LIBS="$LIBS -L/sw/lib"
+fi
+
 dnl Checks for libraries.
 
 dnl Checks for header files.
+dnl We do this in multiple stages, because unlike Linux all the other operating systems really suck and don't include their own dependencies.
+
 AC_HEADER_STDC
-AC_CHECK_HEADERS([fcntl.h limits.h sys/ioctl.h syslog.h unistd.h \
-sys/time.h malloc.h strings.h sys/file.h])
+AC_CHECK_HEADERS([stdbool.h syslog.h sys/file.h sys/ioctl.h sys/param.h sys/time.h sys/socket.h sys/wait.h sys/mman.h netdb.h arpa/inet.h])
+AC_CHECK_HEADERS([net/if.h net/ethernet.h net/if_arp.h netinet/in_systm.h netinet/in.h netinet/in6.h],
+  [], [],
+  [#ifdef HAVE_SYS_TYPES_H
+   #include <sys/types.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETDB_H
+   #include <netdb.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_ARPA_INET_H
+   #include <arpa/inet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_SYS_SOCKET_H
+   #include <sys/socket.h>
+   #endif
+  ]
+)
+AC_CHECK_HEADERS([netinet/if_ether.h netinet/ip.h netinet/ip6.h],
+  [], [],
+  [#ifdef HAVE_SYS_TYPES_H
+   #include <sys/types.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETDB_H
+   #include <netdb.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_ARPA_INET_H
+   #include <arpa/inet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_SYS_SOCKET_H
+   #include <sys/socket.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_H
+   #include <net/if.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_SYSTM_H
+   #include <netinet/in_systm.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_H
+   #include <netinet/in.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN6_H
+   #include <netinet/in6.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_ETHERNET_H
+   #include <net/ethernet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_ARP_H
+   #include <net/if_arp.h>
+   #endif
+  ]
+)
+AC_CHECK_HEADERS([netinet/tcp.h netinet/ip_icmp.h netinet/icmp6.h],
+  [], [],
+  [#ifdef HAVE_SYS_TYPES_H
+   #include <sys/types.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETDB_H
+   #include <netdb.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_ARPA_INET_H
+   #include <arpa/inet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_SYS_SOCKET_H
+   #include <sys/socket.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_H
+   #include <net/if.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_SYSTM_H
+   #include <netinet/in_systm.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_H
+   #include <netinet/in.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IP_H
+   #include <netinet/ip.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN6_H
+   #include <netinet/in6.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IP6_H
+   #include <netinet/ip6.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_ETHERNET_H
+   #include <net/ethernet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_ARP_H
+   #include <net/if_arp.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IF_ETHER_H
+   #include <netinet/if_ether.h>
+   #endif
+  ]
+)
 
 dnl Checks for typedefs, structures, and compiler characteristics.
 AC_C_CONST
+AC_C_VOLATILE
 AC_TYPE_PID_T
 AC_TYPE_SIZE_T
 AC_HEADER_TIME
 AC_STRUCT_TM
 
+tinc_ATTRIBUTE(__malloc__)
+
+AC_CHECK_TYPES([socklen_t, struct arphdr, struct ether_arp, struct in_addr, struct addrinfo, struct ip, struct icmp, struct in6_addr, struct sockaddr_in6, struct ip6_hdr, struct icmp6_hdr, struct nd_neighbor_solicit, struct nd_opt_hdr], , ,
+  [#ifdef HAVE_SYS_TYPES_H
+   #include <sys/types.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETDB_H
+   #include <netdb.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_ARPA_INET_H
+   #include <arpa/inet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_SYS_SOCKET_H
+   #include <sys/socket.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_H
+   #include <net/if.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_SYSTM_H
+   #include <netinet/in_systm.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN_H
+   #include <netinet/in.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IP_H
+   #include <netinet/ip.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_TCP_H
+   #include <netinet/tcp.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IN6_H
+   #include <netinet/in6.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IP6_H
+   #include <netinet/ip6.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_ETHERNET_H
+   #include <net/ethernet.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NET_IF_ARP_H
+   #include <net/if_arp.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IF_ETHER_H
+   #include <netinet/if_ether.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_IP_ICMP_H
+   #include <netinet/ip_icmp.h>
+   #endif
+   #ifdef HAVE_NETINET_ICMP6_H
+   #include <netinet/icmp6.h>
+   #endif
+  ]
+)
+
 dnl Checks for library functions.
 AC_FUNC_MEMCMP
 AC_FUNC_ALLOCA
 AC_TYPE_SIGNAL
-AC_CHECK_FUNCS([ftime socket select strtol strerror flock unsetenv \
-asprintf putenv strdup fcloseall daemon strsignal get_current_dir_name])
+AC_CHECK_FUNCS([asprintf daemon fchmod fcloseall flock ftime fork get_current_dir_name gettimeofday mlockall putenv random select strdup strerror strsignal strtol system unsetenv vsyslog])
 jm_FUNC_MALLOC
 jm_FUNC_REALLOC
 
-AM_GNU_GETTEXT
-
-
 dnl Support for SunOS
 
 AC_CHECK_FUNC(socket, [], [
@@ -93,79 +266,36 @@ AC_CHECK_FUNC(gethostbyname, [], [
   AC_CHECK_LIB(nsl, gethostbyname)
 ])
 
+AC_CHECK_FUNCS([freeaddrinfo gai_strerror getaddrinfo getnameinfo inet_aton])
+
 AC_CACHE_SAVE
 
 dnl These are defined in files in m4/
-tinc_TUNTAP
-
-       use_gcrypt=0
-       use_openssl=0
-
-       AC_ARG_WITH(gcrypt,
-       [  --with-gcrypt           Use GCRYPT for all cryptographic functions],
-       [
-         if test "x$withval" = "xyes" ; then
-           use_gcrypt=1
-         else
-           use_gcrypt=0
-         fi
-       ],
-       [use_gcrypt=0])
-
-       AC_ARG_WITH(openssl,
-       [  --with-openssl          Use OpenSSL for all cryptographic functions],
-       [
-         if test "x$withval" = "xyes" ; then
-           use_openssl=1
-         else
-           use_openssl=0
-         fi
-       ],
-       [use_openssl=0])
-
-       if test \( $use_gcrypt -eq 0 -a $use_openssl -eq 0 \) \
-            -o \( $use_gcrypt -eq 1 -a $use_openssl -eq 1 \) ; then
-         cat << EOM
-Error: You must select exactly one of GCRYPT or OpenSSL.
-EOM
-         echo use_openssl=$use_openssl, use_gcrypt=$use_gcrypt
-         exit 1
-       fi
-
-       if test $use_gcrypt -eq 1 ; then
-         AC_MSG_RESULT([Selecting GCRYPT for crypto])
-         tinc_GCRYPT
-         AC_DEFINE(USE_GCRYPT)
-       fi
-       if test $use_openssl -eq 1 ; then
-         AC_MSG_RESULT([Selecting OpenSSL for crypto])
-         tinc_OPENSSL
-         AC_DEFINE(USE_OPENSSL)
-       fi
-
-       tinc_ZLIB
+
+case $host_os in
+  *linux*)
+    tinc_TUNTAP
+  ;;
+esac
+
+tinc_OPENSSL
+tinc_ZLIB
+tinc_LZO
 
 dnl Check if support for jumbograms is requested 
 AC_ARG_ENABLE(jumbograms,
-  [  --enable-jumbograms     enable support for jumbograms (packets up to 9000 bytes)],
-  [ AC_DEFINE(ENABLE_JUMBOGRAMS) ]
+  AC_HELP_STRING([--enable-jumbograms], [enable support for jumbograms (packets up to 9000 bytes)]),
+  [ AC_DEFINE(ENABLE_JUMBOGRAMS, 1, [Support for jumbograms (packets up to 9000 bytes)]) ]
 )
 
 dnl Check if checkpoint tracing has to be enabled
 AC_ARG_ENABLE(tracing,
-  [  --enable-tracing        enable checkpoint tracing (debugging only)],
-  [ AC_DEFINE(ENABLE_TRACING) ]
+  AC_HELP_STRING([--enable-tracing], [enable checkpoint tracing (debugging only)]),
+  [ AC_DEFINE(ENABLE_TRACING, 1, [Checkpoint tracing]) ]
 )
 
 AC_SUBST(INCLUDES)
 
-AC_OUTPUT(Makefile
-src/Makefile
-src/pokey/Makefile
-doc/Makefile
-doc/es/Makefile
-intl/Makefile
-lib/Makefile
-m4/Makefile
-po/Makefile.in
-)
+AC_CONFIG_FILES([Makefile src/Makefile doc/Makefile doc/tincd.8 doc/tinc.conf.5 doc/tincinclude.texi lib/Makefile po/Makefile.in m4/Makefile])
+
+AC_OUTPUT
index 3d1d2d3..24b8504 100644 (file)
--- a/cvsusers
+++ b/cvsusers
@@ -1,3 +1,3 @@
-zarq:Ivo Timmermans <itimmermans@bigfoot.com>
-guus:Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>
+zarq:Ivo Timmermans <ivo@o2w.nl>
+guus:Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>
 wsl:Wessel Dankers <wsl@nl.linux.org>
index 09f1230..3af434f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 This document describes how nodes in a VPN find and connect to eachother and
 maintain a stable network.
 
-   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>
+   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>
 
    Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
    this documentation provided the copyright notice and this
@@ -12,343 +12,34 @@ maintain a stable network.
    provided that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
    under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one.
 
-   $Id: CONNECTIVITY,v 1.2 2002/04/12 08:25:01 guus Exp $
+   $Id: CONNECTIVITY,v 1.3 2003/08/24 20:38:18 guus Exp $
 
-1. Problem
-==========
-
-We have a set of nodes (A, B, C, ...) that are part of the same VPN. They need
-to connect to eachother and form a single graph that satisfies the tree
-property.
-
-There is the possibility that loops are formed, the offending connections must
-be eliminated.
-
-Suppose we start with two smaller graphs that want to form a single larger
-graph. Both graphs consist of three nodes:
-
-  A-----B-----C
-  
-  
-
-  D-----E-----F
-  
-It is very well possible that A wants to connect to D, and F wants to connect
-to C, both at the same time. The following loop will occur:
-
-  A-----B-----C
-  |           ^
-  |           |
-  v           |
-  D-----E-----F
-
-The situation described here is totally symmetric, there is no preference to
-one connection over the other. The problem of resolving the loop, maintaining
-consistency and stability is therefore not a trivial one.
-
-What happens when A---D and C---F are connected to eachother? They exchange
-lists of known hosts. A knows of B and C, and D knows of E and F. The protocol
-defines ADD_HOST messages, from now on we will say that "node X sends and
-ADD_HOST(Y) to Z".
-
-There are two possible scenarios: either both A---D and C---F finish
-authentication at the same time, or A---D finishes first, so that ADD_HOST
-messages will reach C and F before they finish authentication.
-
-1.1 A---D finishes first
-------------------------
-
-After A---D authentication finishes the following actions are taken:
-
-  1 A sends ADD_HOST(B) to D
-    A sends ADD_HOST(C) to D
-    D sends ADD_HOST(E) to A
-    D sends ADD_HOST(F) to A
-
-  2 A sends ADD_HOST(D) to B
-    A receives ADD_HOST(E) from D:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(E) to B
-    A receives ADD_HOST(F) from D:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(F) to B
-    D sends ADD_HOST(A) to E
-    D receives ADD_HOST(B) from A:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(B) to E
-    D receives ADD_HOST(C) from A:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(C) to E
-
-  3 B receives ADD_HOST(D) from A,
-      B sends ADD_HOST(D) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(E) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(E) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(F) to C
-    E receives ADD_HOST(A) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(A) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(B) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(B) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(C) to F
-
-  4 C receives ADD_HOST(D) from B.
-    C receives ADD_HOST(E) from B.
-    C receives ADD_HOST(F) from B.
-    F receives ADD_HOST(A) from E.
-    F receives ADD_HOST(B) from E.
-    F receives ADD_HOST(C) from E.
-
-Then C---F authentication finishes, the following actions are taken:
-
-  1 C notes that F is already known:
-      Connection is closed.
-    F notes that C is already known:
-      Connection is closed.
-
-1.2 Both A---D and C---F finish at the same time.
--------------------------------------------------
-
-  1 A sends ADD_HOST(B) to D
-    A sends ADD_HOST(C) to D
-    D sends ADD_HOST(E) to A
-    D sends ADD_HOST(F) to A
-    
-    C sends ADD_HOST(A) to F
-    C sends ADD_HOST(B) to F
-    F sends ADD_HOST(D) to C
-    F sends ADD_HOST(E) to C
-
-  2 A sends ADD_HOST(D) to B
-    A receives ADD_HOST(E) from D:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(E) to B
-    A receives ADD_HOST(F) from D:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(F) to B
-    D sends ADD_HOST(A) to E
-    D receives ADD_HOST(B) from A:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(B) to E
-    D receives ADD_HOST(C) from A:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(C) to E
-
-    C sends ADD_HOST(F) to B
-    C receives ADD_HOST(D) from F:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(D) to B
-    C receives ADD_HOST(E) from F:
-      A sends ADD_HOST(E) to B
-    F sends ADD_HOSTS(C) to E
-    F receives ADD_HOST(A) from C:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(A) to E
-    F receives ADD_HOST(B) from C:
-      D sends ADD_HOST(B) to E
-
-  3 B receives ADD_HOST(D) from A,
-      B sends ADD_HOST(D) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(E) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(E) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(F) to C
-    E receives ADD_HOST(A) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(A) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(B) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(B) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(C) to F
-    
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F) from C, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    B receives ADD_HOST(D) from C, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    B receives ADD_HOST(E) from C, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C) from F, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(A) from F, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(B) from F, and notes that is is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-
-  4 A receives ADD_HOST(D) from B, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    A receives ADD_HOST(E) from B, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    A receives ADD_HOST(F) from B, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    F receives ADD_HOST(A) from E, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    F receives ADD_HOST(B) from E, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    F receives ADD_HOST(B) from E, and notes that it is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
+1. Synchronisation
+==================
 
-    ...
+Each tinc daemon has zero or more connections to other tinc daemons. It will
+try to keep its own information synchronised with the other tinc daemons. If
+one of its peers sends information, the tinc daemon will check if it is new
+information. If so, it will update its own information and forward the new
+information to all the other peers.
 
-1.2.1 Augmenting ADD_HOST
--------------------------
+This scheme will make sure that after a short amount of time all tinc daemons
+share the same information. It will also almost completely prevent information
+from looping, because "new" information that is already known is ignored and
+not forwarded any further. However, since information can also be deleted
+there's the possibility of a looping sequence of add/delete messages. This is
+resolved by additionaly adding a unique identifier to each broadcasted message.
+Messages are dropped if the same message with that identifier has already been
+seen.
 
-A solution would be to augment ADD_HOST with an extra parameter, the nexthop of
-the added host:
-
-  3 B receives ADD_HOST(D,A) from A,
-      B sends ADD_HOST(D,A) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(E,D) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(E,D) to C
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F,E) from A:
-      B sends ADD_HOST(F,E) to C
-    E receives ADD_HOST(A,D) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(A,D) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(B,A) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(B,A) to F
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C,B) from D:
-      E sends ADD_HOST(C,B) to F
-    
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F,C) from C, and notes that F is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    B receives ADD_HOST(D,E) from C, and notes that D is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    B receives ADD_HOST(E,F) from C, and notes that E is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C,F) from F, and notes that C is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(A,B) from F, and notes that A is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-    E receives ADD_HOST(B,C) from F, and notes that B is already known:
-      <insert solution here>
-
-So, B and E have to make a choice. Which ADD_HOST is going to win? Fortunately,
-since the ADD_HOST messages are augmented, they have an extra piece of
-information they can use to decide in a deterministic way which one is going to
-win. For example, B got ADD_HOST(F,E) and ADD_HOST(F,C). Since "E" > "C", it
-could let ADD_HOST(F,E) win.
-
-    B receives ADD_HOST(F,C) from C, and notes that F is already known:
-      since "C" < "E", B ignores ADD_HOST(F,E)
-      B sends ADD_HOST(F,C) to A
-    ...
-    E receives ADD_HOST(C,F) from F, and notes that C is already known:
-      since "F" > "B", E removes the ADD_HOST(C,B) in favour of the new one
-      E sends ADD_HOST(C,F) to D
-
-  4 A receives ADD_HOST(F,E) from B, and notes that F is already known:
-      since "E" < "D", A ignores ADD_HOST(F,D).
-    ...
-    D receives ADD_HOST(C,F) from E, and notes that C is already known:
-      since "F" > "B", D removes the ADD_HOST(C,B),
-      closes the connection with C, in favour of the new one.
-
-Ok, time to forget this crap.
-
-1.2.2
------
-
-The problem with the current ADD/DEL_HOST technique is that each host only
-knows the general direction in which to send packets for the other hosts. It
-really doesn't know much about the true topology of the network, only about
-it's direct neighbours. With so little information each host cannot make a
-certain decision which it knows for sure all the others will decide too.
-
-Let's do something totally different. Instead of notifying every host of the
-addition of a new host, which is represented by a vertex in a graph, lets send
-out notifications of new connections, which are the edges in a graph. This is
-rather cheap, since our graphs are (almost) spanning trees, there is
-approximately one edge for each vertex in the graph, so we don't need to send
-more messages. Furthermore, an edge is characterized by two vertices, so we
-only send a fixed amount of extra information. The size/complexity of the
-problem therefore does not increase much.
-
-What is the advantage of notifying each vertex of new edges instead of new
-vertices? Well, all the vertices now know exactly which connections are made
-between each host. This was not known with the former schemes.
-
-Ok back to our problem:
-
-  A-----B-----C
-  
-  
-
-  D-----E-----F
-  
-Edges are undirected, and are characterised by the vertices it connects, sorted
-alphabetically, so the edges in the two graphs are:
-
-(A,B), (B,C), (D,E) and (E,F).
-
-So again we have that A wants to connect to D, and F wants to connect to C,
-both at the same time. The following loop will occur:
-
-  A-----B-----C
-  |           ^
-  |           |
-  v           |
-  D-----E-----F
-
-Instead of sending ADD_HOSTs, lets assume the hosts send ADD_EDGEs. So, after
-making the connections:
-
-  1 A sends ADD_EDGE(A,D) to B
-    A sends ADD_EDGE(A,B) to D
-    A sends ADD_EDGE(B,C) to D
-    D sends ADD_EDGE(A,D) to E
-    D sends ADD_EDGE(D,E) to A
-    D sends ADD_EDGE(E,F) to A
-    
-    C sends ADD_EDGE(C,F) to B
-    C sends ADD_EDGE(A,B) to F
-    C sends ADD_EDGE(B,C) to F
-    F sends ADD_EDGE(C,F) to E
-    F sends ADD_EDGE(D,E) to C
-    F sends ADD_EDGE(E,F) to C
-
-  2 B receives ADD_EDGE(A,D) from A:
-      B sends ADD_EDGE(A,D) to C
-    B receives ADD_EDGE(D,E) from A:
-      B sends ADD_EDGE(D,E) to C
-    B receives ADD_EDGE(E,F) from A:
-      B sends ADD_EDGE(E,F) to C
-    ...
-    
-    B receives ADD_EDGE(C,F) from C, notes that both C and F are already known,
-    but that the edge (C,F) was not known, so a loop has been created:
-      <resolve loop here>
-
-Ok, how to resolve the loop? Remeber, we want to do that in such a way that it
-is consistent with the way all the other hosts resolve the loop. Here is the
-things B does when it notices that a loop is going to be formed:
-
-  B performs a Breadth First Search from the first element of the list of all
-  known hosts sorted alfabetically, in this case A, and thereby finds a
-  spanning tree. (This might later be changed into a minimum spanning tree
-  alhorithm, but the key point here is that all hosts do this with exactly the
-  same starting parameters.) All known edges that are not in the spanning tree
-  are marked inactive.
-
-An edge marked inactive does not mean anything, unless this edge is connected
-to B itself. In that case, B will stop sending messages over that edge. B might
-consider closing this edge, but this is not really needed. Keeping it means no
-DEL_EDGE has to be sent for it, and if another edge is removed (which will
-quite certainly split the graph if it's a spanning tree), this edge might be
-reactivated, without the need of sending a new ADD_EDGE for it. On the other
-hand, we mustn't keep to many inactive edges, because we want to keep the
-number of known edges linear to the number of hosts (otherwise the size of the
-problem will grow quadratically).
-
-So, since B didn't deactivate one of it's own edges, it forwards the
-ADD_EDGE(C,F) to A, which also does a BFS, and so on, until it reaches F. F of
-course also does a BFS, notes that is is one of it's own edges. It deactivates
-the edge (C,F), and consequently will not forward the ADD_EDGE(C,F) to C
-anymore. In the mean time, C got messages from B which will make C do the same.
-
-Ok, suppose a DEL_EDGE was sent, and it means an inactive edge has to be
-reactivated. The vertices connected by that edge must exchange their entire
-knowledge of edges again, because in the mean time other messages could have
-been sent, which were not properly forwarded. Take this example:
+2. Routing
+==========
 
-  X     C-----D
-  |     |     |
-  |     |     |
-  v     |     |
-  A-----B- - -E
+Every node tells its peers to which other peers it is connected. This way
+every node will eventually know every connection every node has on the VPN.
+Each node will use graph algorithms to determine if other nodes are reachable or not and
+what the best route is to other nodes.
 
-The edge (B,E) is inactive. X is trying to make a new connection with A. A
-sends an ADD_EDGE(A,X) to B, which forwards it to C. At that time, the
-connection between C and D goes down, so C sends a DEL_EDGE(C,D) to B, and D
-sends a DEL_EDGE(C,D) to E. If we just allow (B,E) to be reactivated again
-without anything else, then E and D will never have received the ADD_EDGE(A,X).
-So, B and E have to exchange edges again, and propagate them to the hosts they
-already know.
+Because all nodes share the same information, using a deterministic algorithm
+each node will calculate the same minimum spanning tree for the entire VPN.
+The MST will be used to send broadcast VPN packets.
diff --git a/doc/GNUmakefile b/doc/GNUmakefile
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 8fb7a6b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,23 +0,0 @@
-# Having a separate GNUmakefile lets me use features of GNU make
-# to generate the man pages.
-# This makefile is used only if you run GNU Make.
-# It is necessary if you want to build targets usually of interest
-# only to the maintainer.
-
-have-Makefile := $(shell test -f Makefile && echo yes)
-
-# If the user runs GNU make but has not yet run ./configure,
-# give them a diagnostic.
-ifeq ($(have-Makefile),yes)
-
-include Makefile
-include $(srcdir)/Makefile.maint
-
-else
-
-all:
-       @echo There seems to be no Makefile in this directory.
-       @echo "You must run ./configure before running \`make'."
-       @exit 1
-
-endif
diff --git a/doc/HOWTO b/doc/HOWTO
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e1b6edf..0000000
--- a/doc/HOWTO
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,175 +0,0 @@
-                                ==============
-                                The TINC HOWTO
-                                ==============
-
-                                Wessel Dankers
-                               wsl@nl.linux.org
-\f
-Introduction
-------------
-Tinc is a system to create a virtual ethernet network on top of an existing
-infrastructure. This infrastructure can be anything from modem lines to
-gigabit ethernet networks, as long as they talk IP. Once you install and
-configure tinc, your host will get an extra IP address, just like it would
-when you stick an extra ethernet card into it. Using this IP address, it can
-communicate with all hosts in its virtual network using strong encryption.
-
-If you install Tinc on a router (and pick your numbers correctly) you can
-have the router forward all packets. This way you can---instead of
-connecting hosts---connect entire sites together! Now you need only one
-outgoing network connection for both internet and intranet.
-\f
-Architecture
-------------
-When a few Tinc daemons are running they will try to seek contact with
-eachother. A daemon is all the time connected to a few other daemons,
-but if traffic is required with a daemon it doesn't know yet, it will
-instantly contact it and exchange keys. These so-called meta-connections
-are made over TCP, using encryption of course.
-
-When actual traffic has to be sent, a daemon checks his connection list to
-see if the addressee is known (and makes contact with it if neccessary).
-All packets are then sent using UDP to the other host, just like in a real
-network. If a packet gets lost, the connection layer of Linux will resend
-the packet, just like it would over a normal network.
-
-Once in a while the daemons will renegotiate keys so that even if a cracker
-breaks one, it'll be of limited use.
-\f
-Getting Tinc
-------------
-Before you fetch the latest tarball, you might want to check if there's a
-package for your Linux distribution. One of the main authors is a Debian
-Developer, so you can expect the Debian packages to be very up to date.
-
-The official website for Tinc can be found at http://tinc.nl.linux.org/.
-There you can find Debian packages, RPM's and of course... the tarball!
-Since we run Doohickey Linux Pro 1.0, for which no package exists (or
-indeed the distribution itself) we shall compile the package ourselves.
-\f
-Building
---------
-The Tinc source adheres to so many standards it makes you head spin.
-Even the debug messages have been localized! Amazing. Tinc also comes
-with a configuration script. If you like to see what is there to
-configure run ./configure --help | more. If you don't have time for such
-nonsense:
-
-       ./configure --sysconfdir=/etc
-
-This will see if your system is nice enough to run tinc on, and will
-create some Makefiles and other stuff which will together build tinc.
-
-       make
-       make install
-
-The first will do the actual build, the second copies all files into place.
-\f
-The kernel
-----------
-Next you will have to configure the kernel to support the tap device.
-It is important that you run a recent kernel, but anything after 2.2.16
-will do. You have to enable both the netlink device AND the ethertap
-device (in that order). Enable them as modules!
-Compile, install =) You don't even have to reboot.
-\f
-Picking your numbers
---------------------
-The first thing we should do is pick network numbers. Tinc has a very
-peculiar taste for network numbers, which is caused by the way it routes
-traffic. However, it turns out to be really handy if you want to use
-your tinc host as a router for a site.
-
-The numbers have to be in a range that is not yet in use in your existing,
-real network! In this example we will use numbers from the 192.168.0/16
-range. This is standard CIDR notation for all IP addresses from 192.168.0.0
-to 192.168.255.255. The /16 means that the first 16 bits form the network
-part.
-
-It is common practice for Tinc networks to use private (RFC 1918) addresses.
-This is not necessary, but it would be a waste to use official addresses
-for a private network!
-
-In the example we will connect three machines: f00f, fdiv and hlt. We will
-give each an address, but not just that, also a slice of our address space
-to play with.
-
-      Host          Real address           Tinc network
-      ---------------------------------------------------
-      f00f          126.202.37.20          192.168.1.1/24
-      fdiv          126.202.37.81          192.168.2.1/24
-      hlt           103.22.1.218           192.168.3.1/24
-
-It is very important that none of the Tinc netmasks overlap! Note how the
-192.168.0/16 network covers the entire address space of the three hosts.
-We will refer to the 192.168.0/16 network as the `umbrella' from now on.
-As you can see we can fit 256 hosts into this umbrella this way, which is
-also the practical maximum for tinc. Let's name our VPN 'fubar'.
-\f
-The configuration file
-----------------------
-Let's create a configuration file for f00f. We have to put it in
-/etc/tinc/fubar because that's how we named our VPN.
-
-       MyOwnVPNIP = 192.168.1.1/24
-       VpnMask    = 255.255.0.0
-       ConnectTo  = 126.202.37.81
-       ConnectTo  = 103.22.1.218
-       TapDevice  = /dev/tap0
-
-The first two lines tell Tinc about the numbers we have chosen above.
-Using the ConnectTo lines, the daemon will seek contact with the rest of
-the umbrella. It's possible to configure any number of ConnectTo lines,
-you can even omit them so that it just sits and waits until someone else
-contacts it. Until someone does, the poor daemon won't be able to send
-any data because it doesn't know where everybody is.
-The TapDevice is where the tinc daemon will interface with the kernel.
-\f
-The passphrases
----------------
-We will have to generate keys for ourselves, and get a key from everybody
-we want to ConnectTo. All of these go into a directory named
-/etc/tinc/fubar/passphrases. PROTECT THIS DIRECTORY!
-
-       mkdir -m 700 /etc/tinc/fubar/passphrases
-
-To generate our own key:
-
-       genauth 1024 >/etc/tinc/fubar/passphrases/local
-
-You should then proceed to give this key to anyone who wants to ConnectTo
-you. DO THIS IN A SECURE MANNER! Anyone who has this number can do icky
-things to the umbrella network! Encrypt it using PGP, GPG or another
-program using asymmetric keys. Read it over the phone (without anyone
-listening of course). Send it by snailmail. Write the key down and bring
-it to your partners personally!
-
-If you get any keys from your partners, store them under their network
-number. For example, the key we get from fdiv's network administrator
-will be stored in /etc/tinc/fubar/passphrases/192.168.2.0 (note the 0).
-\f
-Running the daemon
-------------------
-If you use a package manager to install Tinc, the startup scripts use a file
-called /etc/tinc/nets.boot to see which umbrella's exist. It has a line
-per VPN, and lines starting with a # are ignored. Ours will contain:
-
-       # Example VPN from the HOWTO
-       fubar
-
-In Debian, /etc/init.d/tinc start will start the daemons.
-
-If you use Doohickey Linux just like we do, you'll have to edit the systems
-startup scripts by hand. It should contain something along the lines of:
-
-       insmod ethertap -s --name=tap0 unit=0
-       ifconfig tap0 hw ether fe:fd:c0:a8:01:01
-       ifconfig tap0 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.0.0 broadcast 192.168.255.255 -arp
-
-There are two things to note here! First, the MAC address of the ethertap
-device is very important. It must start with fe:fd, and end in the
-hexadecimal representation of the VPN IP number.
-Second, the netmask of the tap device is set to that of the umbrella!
-
---
-$Id: HOWTO,v 1.6 2002/04/12 08:25:01 guus Exp $
index b62feb7..f1aa7fb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,20 +1,12 @@
 ## Process this file with automake to get Makefile.in
 
-SUBDIRS = es
-
 info_TEXINFOS = tinc.texi
 
-dyn_MANS =
-man_aux = $(dyn_MANS:.8=.x)
-
-man_MANS = tincd.8 tinc.conf.5 $(dyn_MANS)
+man_MANS = tincd.8 tinc.conf.5
 
-PERL = @PERL@
-HELP2MAN = help2man
-MAINTAINERCLEANFILES = $(dyn_MANS)
+EXTRA_DIST = tincinclude.texi.in tincd.8.in tinc.conf.5.in sample-config.tar.gz
 
-EXTRA_DIST = $(man_MANS) $(HELP2MAN) $(man_aux) \
-  Makefile.maint GNUmakefile Makefile.summ sample-config.tar.gz
+CLEANFILES = *.html
 
 # Use `ginstall' in the definition of man_MANS to avoid
 # confusion with the `install' target.  The install rule transforms `ginstall'
@@ -23,3 +15,12 @@ transform = s/ginstall/install/; @program_transform_name@
 
 # For additional rules usually of interest only to the maintainer,
 # see GNUmakefile and Makefile.maint.
+
+sample-config.tar.gz: sample-config
+       GZIP=$(GZIP_ENV) $(AMTAR) chozf sample-config.tar.gz sample-config
+
+texi2html: tinc.texi
+       texi2html -split=chapter tinc.texi
+
+%.html: $(man_MANS)
+       w3mman2html $< > $@
diff --git a/doc/Makefile.maint b/doc/Makefile.maint
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 75804f0..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,38 +0,0 @@
-# This -*- Makefile -*- uses features of GNU make.
-# It is included via GNUmakefile.
-
-# The following one line summaries were extracted from the
-# original man pages using this bit of sh code:
-# for i in *.1; do echo "$i: "|tr -d '\012'; \
-#   grep -A1 SH.NAME $i|sed '/SH NAME/d;s/^[^ ][^ ]* .- //'; done
-
-include Makefile.summ
-
-HELP2MAN-run = $(PERL) -w -- $(srcdir)/$(HELP2MAN)
-
-# Depend on configure.in to get version number changes.
-$(dyn_MANS): $(top_srcdir)/configure.in
-
-# Depend on the source file containing the --help text.
-# Filter out irregular cases.
-regular-men = $(filter-out $(irregular-men),$(dyn_MANS))
-$(regular-men): %.8: $(top_srcdir)/src/%.c
-
-executable = $(patsubst %/install,%/ginstall, ../src/$(basename $@))
-$(dyn_MANS): %.8: %.x $(HELP2MAN)
-       @if test -f $(executable); then \
-         echo "Updating man page $@"; \
-         rm -f $@-t $@; \
-         $(HELP2MAN-run) \
-           --name="$($(basename $@)-summary)" \
-           --include=$(basename $@).x \
-           $(executable) > $@-t; \
-         chmod -w $@-t; \
-         mv $@-t $@; \
-       else \
-         echo "WARNING: The man page $@ cannot be updated yet."; \
-         echo "         Retry once the corresponding executable is built."; \
-       fi
-
-sample-config.tar.gz:
-       GZIP=$(GZIP_ENV) $(AMTAR) chozf sample-config.tar.gz sample-config
diff --git a/doc/Makefile.summ b/doc/Makefile.summ
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a97b492..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,2 +0,0 @@
-# -*- makefile -*-
-tincd-summary = tinc VPN daemon
index 902ed4e..2162dae 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 This is the network infrastructure documentation for tinc, a Virtual Private
 Network daemon.
 
-   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>
+   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>
 
    Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
    this documentation provided the copyright notice and this
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Network daemon.
    provided that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
    under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one.
 
-   $Id: NETWORKING,v 1.2 2002/04/12 08:25:01 guus Exp $
+   $Id: NETWORKING,v 1.3 2003/08/24 20:38:18 guus Exp $
 
 1. Packet flow
 ==============
index 66544f1..727ba79 100644 (file)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 This is the protocol documentation for tinc, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
 
-   Copyright 2000-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>,
-             2000-2002 Ivo Timmmermans <itimmermans@bigfoot.com>
+   Copyright 2000-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>,
+             2000-2002 Ivo Timmmermans <ivo@o2w.nl>
 
    Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
    this documentation provided the copyright notice and this
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ This is the protocol documentation for tinc, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
    provided that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
    under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one.
 
-   $Id: PROTOCOL,v 1.2 2002/04/12 08:25:01 guus Exp $
+   $Id: PROTOCOL,v 1.3 2003/08/24 20:38:18 guus Exp $
 
 
 1.  Protocols used in tinc
@@ -69,24 +69,62 @@ synchronised.
 
 daemon message
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-origin ADD_EDGE node1 12.23.34.45 655 node2 21.32.43.54 655 222 0
-                    |       |       |  \___________________/  |  +-> options
-                    |       |       |             |           +----> weight
-                   |       |       |             +----------------> see below
-                   |       |       +--> UDP port
-                   |       +----------> real address
-                    +------------------> name of node on one side of the edge
+origin ADD_EDGE node1 node2 21.32.43.54 655 222 0
+                   |     |        |       |   |  +-> options
+                   |     |        |       |   +----> weight
+                          |     |        |       +--------> UDP port of node2
+                          |     |        +----------------> real address of node2
+                          |     +-------------------------> name of destination node
+                   +-------------------------------> name of source node
 
 origin ADD_SUBNET node 192.168.1.0/24
                      |         |     +--> prefixlength
-                     |         +--------> IPv4 network address
+                     |         +--------> network address
                      +------------------> owner of this subnet
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
+The ADD_EDGE messages are to inform other tinc daemons that a connection between
+two nodes exist. The address of the destination node is available so that
+VPN packets can be sent directly to that node.
+
+The ADD_SUBNET messages inform other tinc daemons that certain subnets belong
+to certain nodes. tinc will use it to determine to which node a VPN packet has
+to be sent.
+
+message
+------------------------------------------------------------------
+DEL_EDGE node1 node2
+                  |     +----> name of destination node
+           +----------> name of source node
+
+DEL_SUBNET node 192.168.1.0/24
+             |         |     +--> prefixlength
+             |         +--------> network address
+             +------------------> owner of this subnet
+------------------------------------------------------------------
+
 In case a connection between two daemons is closed or broken, DEL_EDGE messages
 are sent to inform the other daemons of that fact. Each daemon will calculate a
 new route to the the daemons, or mark them unreachable if there isn't any.
 
+message
+------------------------------------------------------------------
+REQ_KEY origin destination
+           |       +--> name of the tinc daemon it wants the key from
+           +----------> name of the daemon that wants the key      
+
+ANS_KEY origin destination 4ae0b0a82d6e0078 91 64 4
+           |       |       \______________/ |  |  +--> MAC length
+           |       |               |        |  +-----> digest algorithm
+           |       |               |        +--------> cipher algorithm
+           |       |               +--> 128 bits key
+           |       +--> name of the daemon that wants the key
+           +----------> name of the daemon that uses this key
+
+KEY_CHANGED origin
+              +--> daemon that has changed it's packet key
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
 The keys used to encrypt VPN packets are not sent out directly. This is
 because it would generate a lot of traffic on VPNs with many daemons, and
 chances are that not every tinc daemon will ever send a packet to every
@@ -97,33 +135,17 @@ act as a proxy and forward its copy back to the requestor.
 
 daemon message
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-daemon REQ_KEY origin destination
-                   |       +--> name of the tinc daemon it wants the key from
-                   +----------> name of the daemon that wants the key      
-
-daemon ANS_KEY origin destination 4ae0b0a82d6e0078 91 64 4
-                   |       |       \______________/ |  |  +--> MAC length
-                   |       |               |        |  +-----> digest algorithm
-                   |       |               |        +--------> cipher algorithm
-                   |       |               +--> 128 bits key
-                   |       +--> name of the daemon that wants the key
-                   +----------> name of the daemon that uses this key
-
-daemon KEY_CHANGED origin
-                      +--> daemon that has changed it's packet key
+origin PING
+dest.  PONG
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 There is also a mechanism to check if hosts are still alive. Since network
 failures or a crash can cause a daemon to be killed without properly
 shutting down the TCP connection, this is necessary to keep an up to date
 connection list. Pings are sent at regular intervals, except when there
-is also some other traffic.
-
-daemon message
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-origin PING
-dest.  PONG
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+is also some other traffic. A little bit of salt (random data) is added
+with each PING and PONG message, to make sure that long sequences of PING/PONG
+messages without any other traffic won't result in known plaintext.
 
 This basically covers everything that is sent over the meta connection by
 tinc.
index b73d34b..138500e 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 This is the security documentation for tinc, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
 
-   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.warande.net>,
+   Copyright 2001-2002 Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>,
              2001-2002 Wessel Dankers <wsl@nl.linux.org>
 
    Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ This is the security documentation for tinc, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
    provided that the entire resulting derived work is distributed
    under the terms of a permission notice identical to this one.
 
-   $Id: SECURITY2,v 1.2 2002/04/12 08:25:01 guus Exp $
+   $Id: SECURITY2,v 1.3 2003/08/24 20:38:18 guus Exp $
 
 Proposed new authentication scheme
 ----------------------------------
@@ -66,17 +66,15 @@ server  CHAL_REPLY 928ffe
 After the correct challenge replies are recieved, both ends have proved
 their identity. Further information is exchanged.
 
-client  ACK 655 12.23.34.45 123 0
-             |       |       |  +-> options
-            |       |       +----> estimated weight
-            |       +------------> IP address of server as seen by client
-            +--------------------> UDP port of client
-
-server  ACK 655 21.32.43.54 321 0
-             |       |       |  +-> options
-            |       |       +----> estimated weight
-            |       +------------> IP address of client as seen by server
-            +--------------------> UDP port of server
+client  ACK 655 123 0
+             |   |  +-> options
+                |   +----> estimated weight
+                +--------> listening port of client
+
+server  ACK 655 321 0
+             |   |  +-> options
+                |   +----> estimated weight
+                +--------> listening port of server
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 This new scheme has several improvements, both in efficiency and security.
diff --git a/doc/es/.cvsignore b/doc/es/.cvsignore
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 6179e0d..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1 +0,0 @@
-Makefile Makefile.in
diff --git a/doc/es/Makefile.am b/doc/es/Makefile.am
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 756d670..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,3 +0,0 @@
-## Process this file with automake to get Makefile.in
-
-# Nothing to see here, go away!
diff --git a/doc/help2man b/doc/help2man
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 71778a9..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,375 +0,0 @@
-#!/usr/bin/perl -w
-
-# Generate a short man page from --help and --version output.
-# Copyright © 1997, 98 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-
-# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
-# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
-# the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
-# any later version.
-
-# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
-# GNU General Public License for more details.
-
-# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
-# along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation,
-# Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
-
-# Written by Brendan O'Dea <bod@compusol.com.au>
-
-use 5.004;
-use strict;
-use Getopt::Long;
-use POSIX qw(strftime setlocale LC_TIME);
-
-my $this_program = 'help2man';
-my $this_version = '1.006';
-my $version_info = <<EOT;
-$this_program $this_version
-
-Copyright (C) 1997, 98 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
-warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
-
-Written by Brendan O'Dea <bod\@compusol.com.au>
-EOT
-
-my $help_info = <<EOT;
-`$this_program' generates a man page out of `--help' and `--version' output.
-
-Usage: $this_program [OPTION]... EXECUTABLE
-
-  --name=STRING       use `STRING' as the description for the NAME paragraph
-  --include=FILE      include material from `FILE'
-  --opt-include=FILE  include material from `FILE' if it exists
-  --output=FILE       send output to `FILE'
-  --no-info           suppress pointer to Texinfo manual
-  --help              print this help, then exit
-  --version           print $this_program program version number, then exit
-
-EXECUTABLE should accept `--help' and `version' options.
-EOT
-
-my ($include, $opt_name, $opt_include, $opt_output, $opt_no_info);
-
-# Parse options.
-GetOptions (
-    'name=s'       => \$opt_name,
-    'include=s'            => \$include,
-    'opt-include=s' => \$opt_include,
-    'output=s'     => \$opt_output,
-    'no-info'      => \$opt_no_info,
-    help           => sub { print $help_info; exit },
-    version        => sub { print $version_info; exit },
-) or die $help_info;
-
-die $help_info unless @ARGV == 1;
-
-my %include = ();
-my @include = (); # to retain order
-
-# Process include file (if given).  Format is:
-#
-# [section name]
-# verbatim text
-
-if ($include or $opt_include)
-{
-    if (open INC, $include || $opt_include)
-    {
-       my $sect;
-
-       while (<INC>)
-       {
-           if (/^\[([^]]+)\]/)
-           {
-               $sect = uc $1;
-               $sect =~ s/^\s+//;
-               $sect =~ s/\s+$//;
-               next;
-           }
-
-           # Silently ignore anything before the first
-           # section--allows for comments and revision info.
-           next unless $sect;
-
-           push @include, $sect unless $include{$sect};
-           $include{$sect} ||= '';
-           $include{$sect} .= $_;
-       }
-
-       close INC;
-
-       die "$this_program: no valid information found in `$include'\n"
-           unless %include;
-
-       # Compress trailing blank lines.
-       for (keys %include)
-       {
-           $include{$_} =~ s/\n+$//;
-           $include{$_} .= "\n" unless /^NAME$/;
-       }
-    }
-    else
-    {
-       die "$this_program: can't open `$include' ($!)\n" if $include;
-    }
-}
-
-# Turn off localisation of executable's ouput.
-@ENV{qw(LANGUAGE LANG LC_ALL)} = ('C') x 3;
-
-# Turn off localisation of date (for strftime)
-setlocale LC_TIME, 'C';
-
-# Grab help and version paragraphs from executable
-my @help = split /\n\n+/, `$ARGV[0] --help 2>/dev/null`
-    or die "$this_program: can't get `--help' info from $ARGV[0]\n";
-
-my @version = split /\n\n+/, `$ARGV[0] --version 2>/dev/null`
-    or die "$this_program: can't get `--version' info from $ARGV[0]\n";
-
-my $date = strftime "%B %Y", localtime;
-my $program = $ARGV[0]; $program =~ s!.*/!!;
-my $package = $program;
-my $version;
-
-if ($opt_output)
-{
-    unlink $opt_output
-       or die "$this_program: can't unlink $opt_output ($!)\n"
-       if -e $opt_output;
-
-    open STDOUT, ">$opt_output"
-       or die "$this_program: can't create $opt_output ($!)\n";
-}
-
-# The first line of the --version information is assumed to be in one
-# of the following formats:
-#
-#   <version>
-#   <program> <version>
-#   GNU <program> <version>
-#   <program> (GNU <package>) <version>
-#   <program> - GNU <package> <version>
-#
-# and seperated from any copyright/author details by a blank line.
-
-$_ = shift @version;
-
-if (/^(\S+)\s+\((GNU\s+[^)]+)\)\s+(.*)/ or
-    /^(\S+)\s+-\s*(GNU\s+\S+)\s+(.*)/)
-{
-    $program = $1;
-    $package = $2;
-    $version = $3;
-}
-elsif (/^(GNU\s+)?(\S+)\s+(.*)/)
-{
-    $program = $2;
-    $package = $1 ? "$1$2" : $2;
-    $version = $3;
-}
-else
-{
-    $version = $_;
-}
-
-$program =~ s!.*/!!;
-
-# no info for `info' itself
-$opt_no_info = 1 if $program eq 'info';
-
-# --name overrides --include contents
-$include{NAME} = "$program \\- $opt_name" if $opt_name;
-
-# Default (useless) NAME paragraph
-$include{NAME} ||= "$program \\- manual page for $program $version";
-
-# Man pages traditionally have the page title in caps.
-my $PROGRAM = uc $program;
-
-# Header.
-print <<EOT;
-.\" DO NOT MODIFY THIS FILE!  It was generated by $this_program $this_version.
-.TH $PROGRAM 1 "$date" "$package $version" "FSF"
-.SH NAME
-$include{NAME}
-EOT
-
-my $accumulate = 1;
-my @description = ();
-
-sub convert_option;
-
-# Output converted --help information.
-for (@help)
-{
-    chomp;
-
-    if (s/^Usage:\s+\S+\s+(.*)\n?//)
-    {
-       # Turn the usage clause into a synopsis.
-       my $synopsis = '';
-
-       do {
-           my $syn = $1;
-           $syn =~ s/(([][]|\.\.+)+)/\\fR$1\\fI/g;
-           $syn =~ s/^/\\fI/ unless $syn =~ s/^\\fR//;
-           $syn .= '\fR';
-           $syn =~ s/\\fI(\s*)\\fR/$1/g;
-
-           $synopsis .= ".br\n" unless $accumulate;
-           $synopsis .= ".B $program\n";
-           $synopsis .= "$syn\n";
-           $accumulate = 0;
-       } while s/^(?:Usage|\s*or):\s+\S+\s+(.*)\n?//;
-
-       # Include file overrides SYNOPSIS.
-       print ".SH SYNOPSIS\n", $include{SYNOPSIS} || $synopsis;
-
-       # Dump any accumulated description text.
-       print ".SH DESCRIPTION\n";
-       print @description;
-
-       # Add additional description text from include file.
-       if ($include{DESCRIPTION})
-       {
-           print ".PP\n" unless $include{DESCRIPTION} =~ /^\..P/;
-           print $include{DESCRIPTION};
-       }
-
-       next unless $_;
-    }
-
-    # Accumulate text if the synopsis has not been produced yet.
-    if ($accumulate)
-    {
-       push @description, ".PP\n" if @description;
-       push @description, "$_\n";
-       next;
-    }
-
-    # Catch start of options.
-    if (/^Options:/)
-    {
-       print qq(.SH OPTIONS\n);
-       s/Options://;
-    }
-
-    # Catch bug report text.
-    if (/^Report bugs |^Email bug reports to /)
-    {
-       print qq(.SH "REPORTING BUGS"\n$_\n);
-       next;
-    }
-
-    # Special case for tar 1.12: --label=NAME\nPATTERN.
-    s{(\n[ \t]*)(-V,[ \t]+--label=NAME.*)\n[ \t]+PATTERN[ \t]+}
-     {$1$2$1\\&...=PATTERN };
-
-    # Convert options.
-    s/(\s)(-[][\w=-]+|\\&\S+)/$1 . convert_option $2/ge;
-
-    # Option subsections have second line indented.
-    print qq(.SS "$1"\n) if s/^(\S.*)\n(\s)/$2/;
-
-    # Lines indented more than about 10 spaces may be assumed to be
-    # continuations of the previous line.
-    s/\n {10,}/ /g;
-
-    # Lines following dotted (*) or numbered points may also be
-    # continued if indented to the same level as the text following
-    # the point.
-    1 while s{((?:^|\n)(\s+)(?:[1-9][.)]|\*)(\s+)(?:[^\n]+))\n\2 \3(\S)}
-            {$1 $4}g;
-
-    # Indented paragraph.
-    if (/^\s/)
-    {
-       for (split /\n/)
-       {
-           s/^\s+//;
-           s/([^,])\s+/$1\n/;
-           print ".TP\n$_\n" if $_;
-       }
-    }
-    # Anything else.
-    else
-    {
-       print ".PP\n$_\n";
-    }
-}
-
-# Print any include items other than the ones we have already dealt
-# with.
-for (@include)
-{
-    print qq(.SH "$_"\n$include{$_})
-       unless /^(NAME|SYNOPSIS|DESCRIPTION|SEE ALSO)$/;
-}
-
-# Refer to the real documentation.
-if ($include{'SEE ALSO'} or !$opt_no_info)
-{
-    print qq(.SH "SEE ALSO"\n);
-    print $include{'SEE ALSO'}, ".PP\n" if $include{'SEE ALSO'};
-
-    print <<EOT unless $opt_no_info;
-The full documentation for
-.B $program
-is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the
-.B info
-and
-.B $program
-programs are properly installed at your site, the command
-.IP
-.B info $program
-.PP
-should give you access to the complete manual.
-EOT
-}
-
-# Output converted --version information.
-for (@version)
-{
-    chomp;
-
-    # Join hyphenated lines.
-    s/([A-Za-z])-\n */$1/g;
-
-    # Convert copyright symbol or (c) to nroff character.
-    s/Copyright\s+(?:\xa9|\([Cc]\))/Copyright \\(co/g;
-
-    # Insert appropriate headings for copyright and author.
-    if    (/^Copyright\s\\/) { print ".SH COPYRIGHT\n" }
-    elsif (/^Written\s+by/)  { print ".SH AUTHOR\n" }
-    else                    { print ".PP\n"; }
-
-    # Insert line breaks before additional copyright messages and the
-    # disclaimer.
-    s/(.)\n(Copyright\s|This is free software)/$1\n.br\n$2/g;
-
-    print "$_\n";
-}
-
-exit;
-
-# Convert option dashes to \- to stop nroff from hyphenating 'em, and
-# embolden.  Option arguments get italicised.
-sub convert_option
-{
-    my $option = '\fB' . shift;
-
-    $option =~ s/-/\\-/g;
-    unless ($option =~ s/\[=(.*)\]$/\\fR[=\\fI$1\\fR]/)
-    {
-       $option =~ s/=(.)/\\fR=\\fI$1/;
-       $option =~ s/ (.)/ \\fI$1/;
-       $option .= '\fR';
-    }
-
-    $option;
-}
index 8f05c4a..2d8b4d6 100644 (file)
@@ -2,14 +2,10 @@
 # This file sets up the tap device.
 # It gives you the freedom to do anything you want with it.
 # Use the correct name for the tap device:
-# For the Linux tun/tap device $INTERFACE is set to the right name,
-# but for ethertap and FreeBSD this is tap0, tap1, tap2 etcetera,
-# for Solaris and OpenBSD it is tun0, tun1, etcetera.
-
-# Set hardware ethernet address (required!)
-ifconfig $INTERFACE hw ether fe:fd:0:0:0:0
+# The environment variable $INTERFACE is set to the right name
+# on most platforms, but if it doesn't work try to set it manually.
 
 # Give it the right ip and netmask. Remember, the subnet of the
 # tap device must be larger than that of the individual Subnets
 # as defined in the host configuration file!
-ifconfig $INTERFACE 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.0.0 -arp
+ifconfig $INTERFACE 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.0.0
index f5f0aa6..25a61a7 100644 (file)
@@ -15,11 +15,8 @@ Name = alpha
 # May be used multiple times for redundance.
 ConnectTo = beta
 
-# The tap device tinc will use. Required.
+# The tap device tinc will use.
 # Default is /dev/tap0 for ethertap or FreeBSD,
 # /dev/tun0 for Solaris and OpenBSD,
-# and /dev/misc/net/tun for Linux tun/tap device.
-Device = /dev/misc/net/tun
-
-# The file in which the private key for this host is stored. Required.
-PrivateKeyFile = /etc/tinc/example/rsa_key.priv
+# and /dev/net/tun for Linux tun/tap device.
+Device = /dev/net/tun
diff --git a/doc/texinfo.tex b/doc/texinfo.tex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index aa52853..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,5484 +0,0 @@
-% texinfo.tex -- TeX macros to handle Texinfo files.
-%
-% Load plain if necessary, i.e., if running under initex.
-\expandafter\ifx\csname fmtname\endcsname\relax\input plain\fi
-%
-\def\texinfoversion{1999-01-05}%
-%
-% Copyright (C) 1985, 86, 88, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98
-% Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-%
-% This texinfo.tex file is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-% modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
-% published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at
-% your option) any later version.
-%
-% This texinfo.tex file is distributed in the hope that it will be
-% useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty
-% of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-% General Public License for more details.
-%
-% You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
-% along with this texinfo.tex file; see the file COPYING.  If not, write
-% to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-% Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
-%
-% In other words, you are welcome to use, share and improve this program.
-% You are forbidden to forbid anyone else to use, share and improve
-% what you give them.   Help stamp out software-hoarding!
-%
-% Please try the latest version of texinfo.tex before submitting bug
-% reports; you can get the latest version from:
-%   ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/texinfo.tex
-%   /home/gd/gnu/doc/texinfo.tex on the GNU machines.
-%   (and all GNU mirrors, see http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html)
-%   ftp://tug.org/tex/texinfo.tex
-%   ftp://ctan.org/macros/texinfo/texinfo.tex
-%   (and all CTAN mirrors, finger ctan@ctan.org for a list).
-% The texinfo.tex in the texinfo distribution itself could well be out
-% of date, so if that's what you're using, please check.
-% 
-% Send bug reports to bug-texinfo@gnu.org.
-% Please include a precise test case in each bug report,
-% including a complete document with which we can reproduce the problem.
-% 
-% To process a Texinfo manual with TeX, it's most reliable to use the
-% texi2dvi shell script that comes with the distribution.  For simple
-% manuals, however, you can get away with:
-%   tex foo.texi
-%   texindex foo.??
-%   tex foo.texi
-%   tex foo.texi
-%   dvips foo.dvi -o # or whatever, to process the dvi file.
-% The extra runs of TeX get the cross-reference information correct.
-% Sometimes one run after texindex suffices, and sometimes you need more
-% than two; texi2dvi does it as many times as necessary.
-
-\message{Loading texinfo [version \texinfoversion]:}
-
-% If in a .fmt file, print the version number
-% and turn on active characters that we couldn't do earlier because
-% they might have appeared in the input file name.
-\everyjob{\message{[Texinfo version \texinfoversion]}%
-  \catcode`+=\active \catcode`\_=\active}
-
-% Save some parts of plain tex whose names we will redefine.
-
-\let\ptexb=\b
-\let\ptexbullet=\bullet
-\let\ptexc=\c
-\let\ptexcomma=\,
-\let\ptexdot=\.
-\let\ptexdots=\dots
-\let\ptexend=\end
-\let\ptexequiv=\equiv
-\let\ptexexclam=\!
-\let\ptexi=\i
-\let\ptexlbrace=\{
-\let\ptexrbrace=\}
-\let\ptexstar=\*
-\let\ptext=\t
-
-% We never want plain's outer \+ definition in Texinfo.
-% For @tex, we can use \tabalign.
-\let\+ = \relax
-
-
-\message{Basics,}
-\chardef\other=12
-
-% If this character appears in an error message or help string, it
-% starts a new line in the output.
-\newlinechar = `^^J
-
-% Set up fixed words for English if not already set.
-\ifx\putwordAppendix\undefined \gdef\putwordAppendix{Appendix}\fi
-\ifx\putwordChapter\undefined  \gdef\putwordChapter{Chapter}\fi
-\ifx\putwordfile\undefined     \gdef\putwordfile{file}\fi
-\ifx\putwordInfo\undefined     \gdef\putwordInfo{Info}\fi
-\ifx\putwordMethodon\undefined \gdef\putwordMethodon{Method on}\fi
-\ifx\putwordon\undefined       \gdef\putwordon{on}\fi
-\ifx\putwordpage\undefined     \gdef\putwordpage{page}\fi
-\ifx\putwordsection\undefined  \gdef\putwordsection{section}\fi
-\ifx\putwordSection\undefined  \gdef\putwordSection{Section}\fi
-\ifx\putwordsee\undefined      \gdef\putwordsee{see}\fi
-\ifx\putwordSee\undefined      \gdef\putwordSee{See}\fi
-\ifx\putwordShortContents\undefined  \gdef\putwordShortContents{Short Contents}\fi
-\ifx\putwordTableofContents\undefined\gdef\putwordTableofContents{Table of Contents}\fi
-
-% Ignore a token.
-%
-\def\gobble#1{}
-
-\hyphenation{ap-pen-dix}
-\hyphenation{mini-buf-fer mini-buf-fers}
-\hyphenation{eshell}
-\hyphenation{white-space}
-
-% Margin to add to right of even pages, to left of odd pages.
-\newdimen \bindingoffset
-\newdimen \normaloffset
-\newdimen\pagewidth \newdimen\pageheight
-
-% Sometimes it is convenient to have everything in the transcript file
-% and nothing on the terminal.  We don't just call \tracingall here,
-% since that produces some useless output on the terminal.
-%
-\def\gloggingall{\begingroup \globaldefs = 1 \loggingall \endgroup}%
-\ifx\eTeXversion\undefined
-\def\loggingall{\tracingcommands2 \tracingstats2
-   \tracingpages1 \tracingoutput1 \tracinglostchars1
-   \tracingmacros2 \tracingparagraphs1 \tracingrestores1
-   \showboxbreadth\maxdimen\showboxdepth\maxdimen
-}%
-\else
-\def\loggingall{\tracingcommands3 \tracingstats2
-   \tracingpages1 \tracingoutput1 \tracinglostchars1
-   \tracingmacros2 \tracingparagraphs1 \tracingrestores1
-   \tracingscantokens1 \tracingassigns1 \tracingifs1
-   \tracinggroups1 \tracingnesting2
-   \showboxbreadth\maxdimen\showboxdepth\maxdimen
-}%
-\fi
-
-% For @cropmarks command.
-% Do @cropmarks to get crop marks.
-% 
-\newif\ifcropmarks
-\let\cropmarks = \cropmarkstrue
-%
-% Dimensions to add cropmarks at corners.
-% Added by P. A. MacKay, 12 Nov. 1986
-%
-\newdimen\outerhsize \newdimen\outervsize % set by the paper size routines
-\newdimen\cornerlong  \cornerlong=1pc
-\newdimen\cornerthick \cornerthick=.3pt
-\newdimen\topandbottommargin \topandbottommargin=.75in
-
-% Main output routine.
-\chardef\PAGE = 255
-\output = {\onepageout{\pagecontents\PAGE}}
-
-\newbox\headlinebox
-\newbox\footlinebox
-
-% \onepageout takes a vbox as an argument.  Note that \pagecontents
-% does insertions, but you have to call it yourself.
-\def\onepageout#1{%
-  \ifcropmarks \hoffset=0pt \else \hoffset=\normaloffset \fi
-  %
-  \ifodd\pageno  \advance\hoffset by \bindingoffset
-  \else \advance\hoffset by -\bindingoffset\fi
-  %
-  % Do this outside of the \shipout so @code etc. will be expanded in
-  % the headline as they should be, not taken literally (outputting ''code).
-  \setbox\headlinebox = \vbox{\let\hsize=\pagewidth \makeheadline}%
-  \setbox\footlinebox = \vbox{\let\hsize=\pagewidth \makefootline}%
-  %
-  {%
-    % Have to do this stuff outside the \shipout because we want it to
-    % take effect in \write's, yet the group defined by the \vbox ends
-    % before the \shipout runs.
-    %
-    \escapechar = `\\     % use backslash in output files.
-    \indexdummies         % don't expand commands in the output.
-    \normalturnoffactive  % \ in index entries must not stay \, e.g., if
-                   % the page break happens to be in the middle of an example.
-    \shipout\vbox{%
-      \ifcropmarks \vbox to \outervsize\bgroup
-        \hsize = \outerhsize
-        \vskip-\topandbottommargin
-        \vtop to0pt{%
-          \line{\ewtop\hfil\ewtop}%
-          \nointerlineskip
-          \line{%
-            \vbox{\moveleft\cornerthick\nstop}%
-            \hfill
-            \vbox{\moveright\cornerthick\nstop}%
-          }%
-          \vss}%
-        \vskip\topandbottommargin
-        \line\bgroup
-          \hfil % center the page within the outer (page) hsize.
-          \ifodd\pageno\hskip\bindingoffset\fi
-          \vbox\bgroup
-      \fi
-      %
-      \unvbox\headlinebox
-      \pagebody{#1}%
-      \ifdim\ht\footlinebox > 0pt
-        % Only leave this space if the footline is nonempty.
-        % (We lessened \vsize for it in \oddfootingxxx.)
-        % The \baselineskip=24pt in plain's \makefootline has no effect.
-        \vskip 2\baselineskip
-        \unvbox\footlinebox
-      \fi
-      %
-      \ifcropmarks
-          \egroup % end of \vbox\bgroup
-        \hfil\egroup % end of (centering) \line\bgroup
-        \vskip\topandbottommargin plus1fill minus1fill
-        \boxmaxdepth = \cornerthick
-        \vbox to0pt{\vss
-          \line{%
-            \vbox{\moveleft\cornerthick\nsbot}%
-            \hfill
-            \vbox{\moveright\cornerthick\nsbot}%
-          }%
-          \nointerlineskip
-          \line{\ewbot\hfil\ewbot}%
-        }%
-      \egroup % \vbox from first cropmarks clause
-      \fi
-    }% end of \shipout\vbox
-  }% end of group with \turnoffactive
-  \advancepageno
-  \ifnum\outputpenalty>-20000 \else\dosupereject\fi
-}
-
-\newinsert\margin \dimen\margin=\maxdimen
-
-\def\pagebody#1{\vbox to\pageheight{\boxmaxdepth=\maxdepth #1}}
-{\catcode`\@ =11
-\gdef\pagecontents#1{\ifvoid\topins\else\unvbox\topins\fi
-% marginal hacks, juha@viisa.uucp (Juha Takala)
-\ifvoid\margin\else % marginal info is present
-  \rlap{\kern\hsize\vbox to\z@{\kern1pt\box\margin \vss}}\fi
-\dimen@=\dp#1 \unvbox#1
-\ifvoid\footins\else\vskip\skip\footins\footnoterule \unvbox\footins\fi
-\ifr@ggedbottom \kern-\dimen@ \vfil \fi}
-}
-
-% Here are the rules for the cropmarks.  Note that they are
-% offset so that the space between them is truly \outerhsize or \outervsize
-% (P. A. MacKay, 12 November, 1986)
-%
-\def\ewtop{\vrule height\cornerthick depth0pt width\cornerlong}
-\def\nstop{\vbox
-  {\hrule height\cornerthick depth\cornerlong width\cornerthick}}
-\def\ewbot{\vrule height0pt depth\cornerthick width\cornerlong}
-\def\nsbot{\vbox
-  {\hrule height\cornerlong depth\cornerthick width\cornerthick}}
-
-% Parse an argument, then pass it to #1.  The argument is the rest of
-% the input line (except we remove a trailing comment).  #1 should be a
-% macro which expects an ordinary undelimited TeX argument.
-%
-\def\parsearg#1{%
-  \let\next = #1%
-  \begingroup
-    \obeylines
-    \futurelet\temp\parseargx
-}
-
-% If the next token is an obeyed space (from an @example environment or
-% the like), remove it and recurse.  Otherwise, we're done.
-\def\parseargx{%
-  % \obeyedspace is defined far below, after the definition of \sepspaces.
-  \ifx\obeyedspace\temp
-    \expandafter\parseargdiscardspace
-  \else
-    \expandafter\parseargline
-  \fi
-}
-
-% Remove a single space (as the delimiter token to the macro call).
-{\obeyspaces %
- \gdef\parseargdiscardspace {\futurelet\temp\parseargx}}
-
-{\obeylines %
-  \gdef\parseargline#1^^M{%
-    \endgroup % End of the group started in \parsearg.
-    %
-    % First remove any @c comment, then any @comment.
-    % Result of each macro is put in \toks0.
-    \argremovec #1\c\relax %
-    \expandafter\argremovecomment \the\toks0 \comment\relax %
-    %
-    % Call the caller's macro, saved as \next in \parsearg.
-    \expandafter\next\expandafter{\the\toks0}%
-  }%
-}
-
-% Since all \c{,omment} does is throw away the argument, we can let TeX
-% do that for us.  The \relax here is matched by the \relax in the call
-% in \parseargline; it could be more or less anything, its purpose is
-% just to delimit the argument to the \c.
-\def\argremovec#1\c#2\relax{\toks0 = {#1}}
-\def\argremovecomment#1\comment#2\relax{\toks0 = {#1}}
-
-% \argremovec{,omment} might leave us with trailing spaces, though; e.g.,
-%    @end itemize  @c foo
-% will have two active spaces as part of the argument with the
-% `itemize'.  Here we remove all active spaces from #1, and assign the
-% result to \toks0.
-%
-% This loses if there are any *other* active characters besides spaces
-% in the argument -- _ ^ +, for example -- since they get expanded.
-% Fortunately, Texinfo does not define any such commands.  (If it ever
-% does, the catcode of the characters in questionwill have to be changed
-% here.)  But this means we cannot call \removeactivespaces as part of
-% \argremovec{,omment}, since @c uses \parsearg, and thus the argument
-% that \parsearg gets might well have any character at all in it.
-%
-\def\removeactivespaces#1{%
-  \begingroup
-    \ignoreactivespaces
-    \edef\temp{#1}%
-    \global\toks0 = \expandafter{\temp}%
-  \endgroup
-}
-
-% Change the active space to expand to nothing.
-%
-\begingroup
-  \obeyspaces
-  \gdef\ignoreactivespaces{\obeyspaces\let =\empty}
-\endgroup
-
-
-\def\flushcr{\ifx\par\lisppar \def\next##1{}\else \let\next=\relax \fi \next}
-
-%% These are used to keep @begin/@end levels from running away
-%% Call \inENV within environments (after a \begingroup)
-\newif\ifENV \ENVfalse \def\inENV{\ifENV\relax\else\ENVtrue\fi}
-\def\ENVcheck{%
-\ifENV\errmessage{Still within an environment; press RETURN to continue}
-\endgroup\fi} % This is not perfect, but it should reduce lossage
-
-% @begin foo  is the same as @foo, for now.
-\newhelp\EMsimple{Press RETURN to continue.}
-
-\outer\def\begin{\parsearg\beginxxx}
-
-\def\beginxxx #1{%
-\expandafter\ifx\csname #1\endcsname\relax
-{\errhelp=\EMsimple \errmessage{Undefined command @begin #1}}\else
-\csname #1\endcsname\fi}
-
-% @end foo executes the definition of \Efoo.
-%
-\def\end{\parsearg\endxxx}
-\def\endxxx #1{%
-  \removeactivespaces{#1}%
-  \edef\endthing{\the\toks0}%
-  %
-  \expandafter\ifx\csname E\endthing\endcsname\relax
-    \expandafter\ifx\csname \endthing\endcsname\relax
-      % There's no \foo, i.e., no ``environment'' foo.
-      \errhelp = \EMsimple
-      \errmessage{Undefined command `@end \endthing'}%
-    \else
-      \unmatchedenderror\endthing
-    \fi
-  \else
-    % Everything's ok; the right environment has been started.
-    \csname E\endthing\endcsname
-  \fi
-}
-
-% There is an environment #1, but it hasn't been started.  Give an error.
-%
-\def\unmatchedenderror#1{%
-  \errhelp = \EMsimple
-  \errmessage{This `@end #1' doesn't have a matching `@#1'}%
-}
-
-% Define the control sequence \E#1 to give an unmatched @end error.
-%
-\def\defineunmatchedend#1{%
-  \expandafter\def\csname E#1\endcsname{\unmatchedenderror{#1}}%
-}
-
-
-% Single-spacing is done by various environments (specifically, in
-% \nonfillstart and \quotations).
-\newskip\singlespaceskip \singlespaceskip = 12.5pt
-\def\singlespace{%
-  % Why was this kern here?  It messes up equalizing space above and below
-  % environments.  --karl, 6may93
-  %{\advance \baselineskip by -\singlespaceskip
-  %\kern \baselineskip}%
-  \setleading \singlespaceskip
-}
-
-%% Simple single-character @ commands
-
-% @@ prints an @
-% Kludge this until the fonts are right (grr).
-\def\@{{\tt\char64}}
-
-% This is turned off because it was never documented
-% and you can use @w{...} around a quote to suppress ligatures.
-%% Define @` and @' to be the same as ` and '
-%% but suppressing ligatures.
-%\def\`{{`}}
-%\def\'{{'}}
-
-% Used to generate quoted braces.
-\def\mylbrace {{\tt\char123}}
-\def\myrbrace {{\tt\char125}}
-\let\{=\mylbrace
-\let\}=\myrbrace
-\begingroup
-  % Definitions to produce actual \{ & \} command in an index.
-  \catcode`\{ = 12 \catcode`\} = 12
-  \catcode`\[ = 1 \catcode`\] = 2
-  \catcode`\@ = 0 \catcode`\\ = 12
-  @gdef@lbracecmd[\{]%
-  @gdef@rbracecmd[\}]%
-@endgroup
-
-% Accents: @, @dotaccent @ringaccent @ubaraccent @udotaccent
-% Others are defined by plain TeX: @` @' @" @^ @~ @= @v @H.
-\let\, = \c
-\let\dotaccent = \.
-\def\ringaccent#1{{\accent23 #1}}
-\let\tieaccent = \t
-\let\ubaraccent = \b
-\let\udotaccent = \d
-
-% Other special characters: @questiondown @exclamdown
-% Plain TeX defines: @AA @AE @O @OE @L (and lowercase versions) @ss.
-\def\questiondown{?`}
-\def\exclamdown{!`}
-
-% Dotless i and dotless j, used for accents.
-\def\imacro{i}
-\def\jmacro{j}
-\def\dotless#1{%
-  \def\temp{#1}%
-  \ifx\temp\imacro \ptexi
-  \else\ifx\temp\jmacro \j
-  \else \errmessage{@dotless can be used only with i or j}%
-  \fi\fi
-}
-
-% Be sure we're in horizontal mode when doing a tie, since we make space
-% equivalent to this in @example-like environments. Otherwise, a space
-% at the beginning of a line will start with \penalty -- and
-% since \penalty is valid in vertical mode, we'd end up putting the
-% penalty on the vertical list instead of in the new paragraph.
-{\catcode`@ = 11
- % Avoid using \@M directly, because that causes trouble
- % if the definition is written into an index file.
- \global\let\tiepenalty = \@M
- \gdef\tie{\leavevmode\penalty\tiepenalty\ }
-}
-
-% @: forces normal size whitespace following.
-\def\:{\spacefactor=1000 }
-
-% @* forces a line break.
-\def\*{\hfil\break\hbox{}\ignorespaces}
-
-% @. is an end-of-sentence period.
-\def\.{.\spacefactor=3000 }
-
-% @! is an end-of-sentence bang.
-\def\!{!\spacefactor=3000 }
-
-% @? is an end-of-sentence query.
-\def\?{?\spacefactor=3000 }
-
-% @w prevents a word break.  Without the \leavevmode, @w at the
-% beginning of a paragraph, when TeX is still in vertical mode, would
-% produce a whole line of output instead of starting the paragraph.
-\def\w#1{\leavevmode\hbox{#1}}
-
-% @group ... @end group forces ... to be all on one page, by enclosing
-% it in a TeX vbox.  We use \vtop instead of \vbox to construct the box
-% to keep its height that of a normal line.  According to the rules for
-% \topskip (p.114 of the TeXbook), the glue inserted is
-% max (\topskip - \ht (first item), 0).  If that height is large,
-% therefore, no glue is inserted, and the space between the headline and
-% the text is small, which looks bad.
-%
-\def\group{\begingroup
-  \ifnum\catcode13=\active \else
-    \errhelp = \groupinvalidhelp
-    \errmessage{@group invalid in context where filling is enabled}%
-  \fi
-  %
-  % The \vtop we start below produces a box with normal height and large
-  % depth; thus, TeX puts \baselineskip glue before it, and (when the
-  % next line of text is done) \lineskip glue after it.  (See p.82 of
-  % the TeXbook.)  Thus, space below is not quite equal to space
-  % above.  But it's pretty close.
-  \def\Egroup{%
-    \egroup           % End the \vtop.
-    \endgroup         % End the \group.
-  }%
-  %
-  \vtop\bgroup
-    % We have to put a strut on the last line in case the @group is in
-    % the midst of an example, rather than completely enclosing it.
-    % Otherwise, the interline space between the last line of the group
-    % and the first line afterwards is too small.  But we can't put the
-    % strut in \Egroup, since there it would be on a line by itself.
-    % Hence this just inserts a strut at the beginning of each line.
-    \everypar = {\strut}%
-    %
-    % Since we have a strut on every line, we don't need any of TeX's
-    % normal interline spacing.
-    \offinterlineskip
-    %
-    % OK, but now we have to do something about blank
-    % lines in the input in @example-like environments, which normally
-    % just turn into \lisppar, which will insert no space now that we've
-    % turned off the interline space.  Simplest is to make them be an
-    % empty paragraph.
-    \ifx\par\lisppar
-      \edef\par{\leavevmode \par}%
-      %
-      % Reset ^^M's definition to new definition of \par.
-      \obeylines
-    \fi
-    %
-    % Do @comment since we are called inside an environment such as
-    % @example, where each end-of-line in the input causes an
-    % end-of-line in the output.  We don't want the end-of-line after
-    % the `@group' to put extra space in the output.  Since @group
-    % should appear on a line by itself (according to the Texinfo
-    % manual), we don't worry about eating any user text.
-    \comment
-}
-%
-% TeX puts in an \escapechar (i.e., `@') at the beginning of the help
-% message, so this ends up printing `@group can only ...'.
-%
-\newhelp\groupinvalidhelp{%
-group can only be used in environments such as @example,^^J%
-where each line of input produces a line of output.}
-
-% @need space-in-mils
-% forces a page break if there is not space-in-mils remaining.
-
-\newdimen\mil  \mil=0.001in
-
-\def\need{\parsearg\needx}
-
-% Old definition--didn't work.
-%\def\needx #1{\par %
-%% This method tries to make TeX break the page naturally
-%% if the depth of the box does not fit.
-%{\baselineskip=0pt%
-%\vtop to #1\mil{\vfil}\kern -#1\mil\nobreak
-%\prevdepth=-1000pt
-%}}
-
-\def\needx#1{%
-  % Go into vertical mode, so we don't make a big box in the middle of a
-  % paragraph.
-  \par
-  %
-  % Don't add any leading before our big empty box, but allow a page
-  % break, since the best break might be right here.
-  \allowbreak
-  \nointerlineskip
-  \vtop to #1\mil{\vfil}%
-  %
-  % TeX does not even consider page breaks if a penalty added to the
-  % main vertical list is 10000 or more.  But in order to see if the
-  % empty box we just added fits on the page, we must make it consider
-  % page breaks.  On the other hand, we don't want to actually break the
-  % page after the empty box.  So we use a penalty of 9999.
-  %
-  % There is an extremely small chance that TeX will actually break the
-  % page at this \penalty, if there are no other feasible breakpoints in
-  % sight.  (If the user is using lots of big @group commands, which
-  % almost-but-not-quite fill up a page, TeX will have a hard time doing
-  % good page breaking, for example.)  However, I could not construct an
-  % example where a page broke at this \penalty; if it happens in a real
-  % document, then we can reconsider our strategy.
-  \penalty9999
-  %
-  % Back up by the size of the box, whether we did a page break or not.
-  \kern -#1\mil
-  %
-  % Do not allow a page break right after this kern.
-  \nobreak
-}
-
-% @br   forces paragraph break
-
-\let\br = \par
-
-% @dots{} output an ellipsis using the current font.
-% We do .5em per period so that it has the same spacing in a typewriter
-% font as three actual period characters.
-%
-\def\dots{%
-  \leavevmode
-  \hbox to 1.5em{%
-    \hskip 0pt plus 0.25fil minus 0.25fil
-    .\hss.\hss.%
-    \hskip 0pt plus 0.5fil minus 0.5fil
-  }%
-}
-
-% @enddots{} is an end-of-sentence ellipsis.
-% 
-\def\enddots{%
-  \leavevmode
-  \hbox to 2em{%
-    \hskip 0pt plus 0.25fil minus 0.25fil
-    .\hss.\hss.\hss.%
-    \hskip 0pt plus 0.5fil minus 0.5fil
-  }%
-  \spacefactor=3000
-}
-
-
-% @page    forces the start of a new page
-%
-\def\page{\par\vfill\supereject}
-
-% @exdent text....
-% outputs text on separate line in roman font, starting at standard page margin
-
-% This records the amount of indent in the innermost environment.
-% That's how much \exdent should take out.
-\newskip\exdentamount
-
-% This defn is used inside fill environments such as @defun.
-\def\exdent{\parsearg\exdentyyy}
-\def\exdentyyy #1{{\hfil\break\hbox{\kern -\exdentamount{\rm#1}}\hfil\break}}
-
-% This defn is used inside nofill environments such as @example.
-\def\nofillexdent{\parsearg\nofillexdentyyy}
-\def\nofillexdentyyy #1{{\advance \leftskip by -\exdentamount
-\leftline{\hskip\leftskip{\rm#1}}}}
-
-% @inmargin{TEXT} puts TEXT in the margin next to the current paragraph.
-
-\def\inmargin#1{%
-\strut\vadjust{\nobreak\kern-\strutdepth
-  \vtop to \strutdepth{\baselineskip\strutdepth\vss
-  \llap{\rightskip=\inmarginspacing \vbox{\noindent #1}}\null}}}
-\newskip\inmarginspacing \inmarginspacing=1cm
-\def\strutdepth{\dp\strutbox}
-
-%\hbox{{\rm#1}}\hfil\break}}
-
-% @include file    insert text of that file as input.
-% Allow normal characters that  we make active in the argument (a file name).
-\def\include{\begingroup
-  \catcode`\\=12
-  \catcode`~=12
-  \catcode`^=12
-  \catcode`_=12
-  \catcode`|=12
-  \catcode`<=12
-  \catcode`>=12
-  \catcode`+=12
-  \parsearg\includezzz}
-% Restore active chars for included file.
-\def\includezzz#1{\endgroup\begingroup
-  % Read the included file in a group so nested @include's work.
-  \def\thisfile{#1}%
-  \input\thisfile
-\endgroup}
-
-\def\thisfile{}
-
-% @center line   outputs that line, centered
-
-\def\center{\parsearg\centerzzz}
-\def\centerzzz #1{{\advance\hsize by -\leftskip
-\advance\hsize by -\rightskip
-\centerline{#1}}}
-
-% @sp n   outputs n lines of vertical space
-
-\def\sp{\parsearg\spxxx}
-\def\spxxx #1{\vskip #1\baselineskip}
-
-% @comment ...line which is ignored...
-% @c is the same as @comment
-% @ignore ... @end ignore  is another way to write a comment
-
-\def\comment{\begingroup \catcode`\^^M=\other%
-\catcode`\@=\other \catcode`\{=\other \catcode`\}=\other%
-\commentxxx}
-{\catcode`\^^M=\other \gdef\commentxxx#1^^M{\endgroup}}
-
-\let\c=\comment
-
-% @paragraphindent  is defined for the Info formatting commands only.
-\let\paragraphindent=\comment
-
-% Prevent errors for section commands.
-% Used in @ignore and in failing conditionals.
-\def\ignoresections{%
-\let\chapter=\relax
-\let\unnumbered=\relax
-\let\top=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsec=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsection=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsubsec=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsubsection=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsubsubsec=\relax
-\let\unnumberedsubsubsection=\relax
-\let\section=\relax
-\let\subsec=\relax
-\let\subsubsec=\relax
-\let\subsection=\relax
-\let\subsubsection=\relax
-\let\appendix=\relax
-\let\appendixsec=\relax
-\let\appendixsection=\relax
-\let\appendixsubsec=\relax
-\let\appendixsubsection=\relax
-\let\appendixsubsubsec=\relax
-\let\appendixsubsubsection=\relax
-\let\contents=\relax
-\let\smallbook=\relax
-\let\titlepage=\relax
-}
-
-% Used in nested conditionals, where we have to parse the Texinfo source
-% and so want to turn off most commands, in case they are used
-% incorrectly.
-%
-\def\ignoremorecommands{%
-  \let\defcodeindex = \relax
-  \let\defcv = \relax
-  \let\deffn = \relax
-  \let\deffnx = \relax
-  \let\defindex = \relax
-  \let\defivar = \relax
-  \let\defmac = \relax
-  \let\defmethod = \relax
-  \let\defop = \relax
-  \let\defopt = \relax
-  \let\defspec = \relax
-  \let\deftp = \relax
-  \let\deftypefn = \relax
-  \let\deftypefun = \relax
-  \let\deftypevar = \relax
-  \let\deftypevr = \relax
-  \let\defun = \relax
-  \let\defvar = \relax
-  \let\defvr = \relax
-  \let\ref = \relax
-  \let\xref = \relax
-  \let\printindex = \relax
-  \let\pxref = \relax
-  \let\settitle = \relax
-  \let\setchapternewpage = \relax
-  \let\setchapterstyle = \relax
-  \let\everyheading = \relax
-  \let\evenheading = \relax
-  \let\oddheading = \relax
-  \let\everyfooting = \relax
-  \let\evenfooting = \relax
-  \let\oddfooting = \relax
-  \let\headings = \relax
-  \let\include = \relax
-  \let\lowersections = \relax
-  \let\down = \relax
-  \let\raisesections = \relax
-  \let\up = \relax
-  \let\set = \relax
-  \let\clear = \relax
-  \let\item = \relax
-}
-
-% Ignore @ignore ... @end ignore.
-%
-\def\ignore{\doignore{ignore}}
-
-% Ignore @ifinfo, @ifhtml, @ifnottex, @html, @menu, and @direntry text.
-%
-\def\ifinfo{\doignore{ifinfo}}
-\def\ifhtml{\doignore{ifhtml}}
-\def\ifnottex{\doignore{ifnottex}}
-\def\html{\doignore{html}}
-\def\menu{\doignore{menu}}
-\def\direntry{\doignore{direntry}}
-
-% @dircategory CATEGORY  -- specify a category of the dir file
-% which this file should belong to.  Ignore this in TeX.
-\let\dircategory = \comment
-
-% Ignore text until a line `@end #1'.
-%
-\def\doignore#1{\begingroup
-  % Don't complain about control sequences we have declared \outer.
-  \ignoresections
-  %
-  % Define a command to swallow text until we reach `@end #1'.
-  % This @ is a catcode 12 token (that is the normal catcode of @ in
-  % this texinfo.tex file).  We change the catcode of @ below to match.
-  \long\def\doignoretext##1@end #1{\enddoignore}%
-  %
-  % Make sure that spaces turn into tokens that match what \doignoretext wants.
-  \catcode32 = 10
-  %
-  % Ignore braces, too, so mismatched braces don't cause trouble.
-  \catcode`\{ = 9
-  \catcode`\} = 9
-  %
-  % We must not have @c interpreted as a control sequence.
-  \catcode`\@ = 12
-  %
-  % Make the letter c a comment character so that the rest of the line
-  % will be ignored. This way, the document can have (for example)
-  %   @c @end ifinfo
-  % and the @end ifinfo will be properly ignored.
-  % (We've just changed @ to catcode 12.)
-  \catcode`\c = 14
-  %
-  % And now expand that command.
-  \doignoretext
-}
-
-% What we do to finish off ignored text.
-%
-\def\enddoignore{\endgroup\ignorespaces}%
-
-\newif\ifwarnedobs\warnedobsfalse
-\def\obstexwarn{%
-  \ifwarnedobs\relax\else
-  % We need to warn folks that they may have trouble with TeX 3.0.
-  % This uses \immediate\write16 rather than \message to get newlines.
-    \immediate\write16{}
-    \immediate\write16{***WARNING*** for users of Unix TeX 3.0!}
-    \immediate\write16{This manual trips a bug in TeX version 3.0 (tex hangs).}
-    \immediate\write16{If you are running another version of TeX, relax.}
-    \immediate\write16{If you are running Unix TeX 3.0, kill this TeX process.}
-    \immediate\write16{  Then upgrade your TeX installation if you can.}
-    \immediate\write16{  (See ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/TeX.README.)}
-    \immediate\write16{If you are stuck with version 3.0, run the}
-    \immediate\write16{  script ``tex3patch'' from the Texinfo distribution}
-    \immediate\write16{  to use a workaround.}
-    \immediate\write16{}
-    \global\warnedobstrue
-    \fi
-}
-
-% **In TeX 3.0, setting text in \nullfont hangs tex.  For a
-% workaround (which requires the file ``dummy.tfm'' to be installed),
-% uncomment the following line:
-%%%%%\font\nullfont=dummy\let\obstexwarn=\relax
-
-% Ignore text, except that we keep track of conditional commands for
-% purposes of nesting, up to an `@end #1' command.
-%
-\def\nestedignore#1{%
-  \obstexwarn
-  % We must actually expand the ignored text to look for the @end
-  % command, so that nested ignore constructs work.  Thus, we put the
-  % text into a \vbox and then do nothing with the result.  To minimize
-  % the change of memory overflow, we follow the approach outlined on
-  % page 401 of the TeXbook: make the current font be a dummy font.
-  %
-  \setbox0 = \vbox\bgroup
-    % Don't complain about control sequences we have declared \outer.
-    \ignoresections
-    %
-    % Define `@end #1' to end the box, which will in turn undefine the
-    % @end command again.
-    \expandafter\def\csname E#1\endcsname{\egroup\ignorespaces}%
-    %
-    % We are going to be parsing Texinfo commands.  Most cause no
-    % trouble when they are used incorrectly, but some commands do
-    % complicated argument parsing or otherwise get confused, so we
-    % undefine them.
-    %
-    % We can't do anything about stray @-signs, unfortunately;
-    % they'll produce `undefined control sequence' errors.
-    \ignoremorecommands
-    %
-    % Set the current font to be \nullfont, a TeX primitive, and define
-    % all the font commands to also use \nullfont.  We don't use
-    % dummy.tfm, as suggested in the TeXbook, because not all sites
-    % might have that installed.  Therefore, math mode will still
-    % produce output, but that should be an extremely small amount of
-    % stuff compared to the main input.
-    %
-    \nullfont
-    \let\tenrm = \nullfont  \let\tenit = \nullfont  \let\tensl = \nullfont
-    \let\tenbf = \nullfont  \let\tentt = \nullfont  \let\smallcaps = \nullfont
-    \let\tensf = \nullfont
-    % Similarly for index fonts (mostly for their use in
-    % smallexample)
-    \let\indrm = \nullfont  \let\indit = \nullfont  \let\indsl = \nullfont
-    \let\indbf = \nullfont  \let\indtt = \nullfont  \let\indsc = \nullfont
-    \let\indsf = \nullfont
-    %
-    % Don't complain when characters are missing from the fonts.
-    \tracinglostchars = 0
-    %
-    % Don't bother to do space factor calculations.
-    \frenchspacing
-    %
-    % Don't report underfull hboxes.
-    \hbadness = 10000
-    %
-    % Do minimal line-breaking.
-    \pretolerance = 10000
-    %
-    % Do not execute instructions in @tex
-    \def\tex{\doignore{tex}}%
-    % Do not execute macro definitions.
-    % `c' is a comment character, so the word `macro' will get cut off.
-    \def\macro{\doignore{ma}}%
-}
-
-% @set VAR sets the variable VAR to an empty value.
-% @set VAR REST-OF-LINE sets VAR to the value REST-OF-LINE.
-%
-% Since we want to separate VAR from REST-OF-LINE (which might be
-% empty), we can't just use \parsearg; we have to insert a space of our
-% own to delimit the rest of the line, and then take it out again if we
-% didn't need it.  Make sure the catcode of space is correct to avoid
-% losing inside @example, for instance.
-%
-\def\set{\begingroup\catcode` =10
-  \catcode`\-=12 \catcode`\_=12 % Allow - and _ in VAR.
-  \parsearg\setxxx}
-\def\setxxx#1{\setyyy#1 \endsetyyy}
-\def\setyyy#1 #2\endsetyyy{%
-  \def\temp{#2}%
-  \ifx\temp\empty \global\expandafter\let\csname SET#1\endcsname = \empty
-  \else \setzzz{#1}#2\endsetzzz % Remove the trailing space \setxxx inserted.
-  \fi
-  \endgroup
-}
-% Can't use \xdef to pre-expand #2 and save some time, since \temp or
-% \next or other control sequences that we've defined might get us into
-% an infinite loop. Consider `@set foo @cite{bar}'.
-\def\setzzz#1#2 \endsetzzz{\expandafter\gdef\csname SET#1\endcsname{#2}}
-
-% @clear VAR clears (i.e., unsets) the variable VAR.
-%
-\def\clear{\parsearg\clearxxx}
-\def\clearxxx#1{\global\expandafter\let\csname SET#1\endcsname=\relax}
-
-% @value{foo} gets the text saved in variable foo.
-%
-{
-  \catcode`\_ = \active
-  %
-  % We might end up with active _ or - characters in the argument if
-  % we're called from @code, as @code{@value{foo-bar_}}.  So \let any
-  % such active characters to their normal equivalents.
-  \gdef\value{\begingroup
-    \catcode`\-=12 \catcode`\_=12
-    \indexbreaks \let_\normalunderscore
-    \valuexxx}
-}
-\def\valuexxx#1{\expandablevalue{#1}\endgroup}
-
-% We have this subroutine so that we can handle at least some @value's
-% properly in indexes (we \let\value to this in \indexdummies).  Ones
-% whose names contain - or _ still won't work, but we can't do anything
-% about that.  The command has to be fully expandable, since the result
-% winds up in the index file.  This means that if the variable's value
-% contains other Texinfo commands, it's almost certain it will fail
-% (although perhaps we could fix that with sufficient work to do a
-% one-level expansion on the result, instead of complete).
-% 
-\def\expandablevalue#1{%
-  \expandafter\ifx\csname SET#1\endcsname\relax
-    {[No value for ``#1'']}%
-  \else
-    \csname SET#1\endcsname
-  \fi
-}
-
-% @ifset VAR ... @end ifset reads the `...' iff VAR has been defined
-% with @set.
-%
-\def\ifset{\parsearg\ifsetxxx}
-\def\ifsetxxx #1{%
-  \expandafter\ifx\csname SET#1\endcsname\relax
-    \expandafter\ifsetfail
-  \else
-    \expandafter\ifsetsucceed
-  \fi
-}
-\def\ifsetsucceed{\conditionalsucceed{ifset}}
-\def\ifsetfail{\nestedignore{ifset}}
-\defineunmatchedend{ifset}
-
-% @ifclear VAR ... @end ifclear reads the `...' iff VAR has never been
-% defined with @set, or has been undefined with @clear.
-%
-\def\ifclear{\parsearg\ifclearxxx}
-\def\ifclearxxx #1{%
-  \expandafter\ifx\csname SET#1\endcsname\relax
-    \expandafter\ifclearsucceed
-  \else
-    \expandafter\ifclearfail
-  \fi
-}
-\def\ifclearsucceed{\conditionalsucceed{ifclear}}
-\def\ifclearfail{\nestedignore{ifclear}}
-\defineunmatchedend{ifclear}
-
-% @iftex, @ifnothtml, @ifnotinfo always succeed; we read the text
-% following, through the first @end iftex (etc.).  Make `@end iftex'
-% (etc.) valid only after an @iftex.
-%
-\def\iftex{\conditionalsucceed{iftex}}
-\def\ifnothtml{\conditionalsucceed{ifnothtml}}
-\def\ifnotinfo{\conditionalsucceed{ifnotinfo}}
-\defineunmatchedend{iftex}
-\defineunmatchedend{ifnothtml}
-\defineunmatchedend{ifnotinfo}
-
-% We can't just want to start a group at @iftex (for example) and end it
-% at @end iftex, since then @set commands inside the conditional have no
-% effect (they'd get reverted at the end of the group).  So we must
-% define \Eiftex to redefine itself to be its previous value.  (We can't
-% just define it to fail again with an ``unmatched end'' error, since
-% the @ifset might be nested.)
-%
-\def\conditionalsucceed#1{%
-  \edef\temp{%
-    % Remember the current value of \E#1.
-    \let\nece{prevE#1} = \nece{E#1}%
-    %
-    % At the `@end #1', redefine \E#1 to be its previous value.
-    \def\nece{E#1}{\let\nece{E#1} = \nece{prevE#1}}%
-  }%
-  \temp
-}
-
-% We need to expand lots of \csname's, but we don't want to expand the
-% control sequences after we've constructed them.
-%
-\def\nece#1{\expandafter\noexpand\csname#1\endcsname}
-
-% @asis just yields its argument.  Used with @table, for example.
-%
-\def\asis#1{#1}
-
-% @math means output in math mode.
-% We don't use $'s directly in the definition of \math because control
-% sequences like \math are expanded when the toc file is written.  Then,
-% we read the toc file back, the $'s will be normal characters (as they
-% should be, according to the definition of Texinfo).  So we must use a
-% control sequence to switch into and out of math mode.
-%
-% This isn't quite enough for @math to work properly in indices, but it
-% seems unlikely it will ever be needed there.
-%
-\let\implicitmath = $
-\def\math#1{\implicitmath #1\implicitmath}
-
-% @bullet and @minus need the same treatment as @math, just above.
-\def\bullet{\implicitmath\ptexbullet\implicitmath}
-\def\minus{\implicitmath-\implicitmath}
-
-% @refill is a no-op.
-\let\refill=\relax
-
-% If working on a large document in chapters, it is convenient to
-% be able to disable indexing, cross-referencing, and contents, for test runs.
-% This is done with @novalidate (before @setfilename).
-%
-\newif\iflinks \linkstrue % by default we want the aux files.
-\let\novalidate = \linksfalse
-
-% @setfilename is done at the beginning of every texinfo file.
-% So open here the files we need to have open while reading the input.
-% This makes it possible to make a .fmt file for texinfo.
-\def\setfilename{%
-   \iflinks 
-     \readauxfile
-   \fi % \openindices needs to do some work in any case.
-   \openindices
-   \fixbackslash  % Turn off hack to swallow `\input texinfo'.
-   \global\let\setfilename=\comment % Ignore extra @setfilename cmds.
-   %
-   % If texinfo.cnf is present on the system, read it.
-   % Useful for site-wide @afourpaper, etc.
-   % Just to be on the safe side, close the input stream before the \input.
-   \openin 1 texinfo.cnf
-   \ifeof1 \let\temp=\relax \else \def\temp{\input texinfo.cnf }\fi
-   \closein1
-   \temp
-   %
-   \comment % Ignore the actual filename.
-}
-
-% Called from \setfilename.
-% 
-\def\openindices{%
-  \newindex{cp}%
-  \newcodeindex{fn}%
-  \newcodeindex{vr}%
-  \newcodeindex{tp}%
-  \newcodeindex{ky}%
-  \newcodeindex{pg}%
-}
-
-% @bye.
-\outer\def\bye{\pagealignmacro\tracingstats=1\ptexend}
-
-
-\message{fonts,}
-% Font-change commands.
-
-% Texinfo sort of supports the sans serif font style, which plain TeX does not.
-% So we set up a \sf analogous to plain's \rm, etc.
-\newfam\sffam
-\def\sf{\fam=\sffam \tensf}
-\let\li = \sf % Sometimes we call it \li, not \sf.
-
-% We don't need math for this one.
-\def\ttsl{\tenttsl}
-
-% Use Computer Modern fonts at \magstephalf (11pt).
-\newcount\mainmagstep
-\mainmagstep=\magstephalf
-
-% Set the font macro #1 to the font named #2, adding on the
-% specified font prefix (normally `cm').
-% #3 is the font's design size, #4 is a scale factor
-\def\setfont#1#2#3#4{\font#1=\fontprefix#2#3 scaled #4}
-
-% Use cm as the default font prefix.
-% To specify the font prefix, you must define \fontprefix
-% before you read in texinfo.tex.
-\ifx\fontprefix\undefined
-\def\fontprefix{cm}
-\fi
-% Support font families that don't use the same naming scheme as CM.
-\def\rmshape{r}
-\def\rmbshape{bx}               %where the normal face is bold
-\def\bfshape{b}
-\def\bxshape{bx}
-\def\ttshape{tt}
-\def\ttbshape{tt}
-\def\ttslshape{sltt}
-\def\itshape{ti}
-\def\itbshape{bxti}
-\def\slshape{sl}
-\def\slbshape{bxsl}
-\def\sfshape{ss}
-\def\sfbshape{ss}
-\def\scshape{csc}
-\def\scbshape{csc}
-
-\ifx\bigger\relax
-\let\mainmagstep=\magstep1
-\setfont\textrm\rmshape{12}{1000}
-\setfont\texttt\ttshape{12}{1000}
-\else
-\setfont\textrm\rmshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\texttt\ttshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\fi
-% Instead of cmb10, you many want to use cmbx10.
-% cmbx10 is a prettier font on its own, but cmb10
-% looks better when embedded in a line with cmr10.
-\setfont\textbf\bfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\textit\itshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\textsl\slshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\textsf\sfshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\textsc\scshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\setfont\textttsl\ttslshape{10}{\mainmagstep}
-\font\texti=cmmi10 scaled \mainmagstep
-\font\textsy=cmsy10 scaled \mainmagstep
-
-% A few fonts for @defun, etc.
-\setfont\defbf\bxshape{10}{\magstep1} %was 1314
-\setfont\deftt\ttshape{10}{\magstep1}
-\def\df{\let\tentt=\deftt \let\tenbf = \defbf \bf}
-
-% Fonts for indices and small examples (9pt).
-% We actually use the slanted font rather than the italic,
-% because texinfo normally uses the slanted fonts for that.
-% Do not make many font distinctions in general in the index, since they
-% aren't very useful.
-\setfont\ninett\ttshape{9}{1000}
-\setfont\ninettsl\ttslshape{10}{900}
-\setfont\indrm\rmshape{9}{1000}
-\setfont\indit\itshape{9}{1000}
-\setfont\indsl\slshape{9}{1000}
-\let\indtt=\ninett
-\let\indttsl=\ninettsl
-\let\indsf=\indrm
-\let\indbf=\indrm
-\setfont\indsc\scshape{10}{900}
-\font\indi=cmmi9
-\font\indsy=cmsy9
-
-% Fonts for title page:
-\setfont\titlerm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep3}
-\setfont\titleit\itbshape{10}{\magstep4}
-\setfont\titlesl\slbshape{10}{\magstep4}
-\setfont\titlett\ttbshape{12}{\magstep3}
-\setfont\titlettsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep4}
-\setfont\titlesf\sfbshape{17}{\magstep1}
-\let\titlebf=\titlerm
-\setfont\titlesc\scbshape{10}{\magstep4}
-\font\titlei=cmmi12 scaled \magstep3
-\font\titlesy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep4
-\def\authorrm{\secrm}
-
-% Chapter (and unnumbered) fonts (17.28pt).
-\setfont\chaprm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep2}
-\setfont\chapit\itbshape{10}{\magstep3}
-\setfont\chapsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep3}
-\setfont\chaptt\ttbshape{12}{\magstep2}
-\setfont\chapttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep3}
-\setfont\chapsf\sfbshape{17}{1000}
-\let\chapbf=\chaprm
-\setfont\chapsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep3}
-\font\chapi=cmmi12 scaled \magstep2
-\font\chapsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep3
-
-% Section fonts (14.4pt).
-\setfont\secrm\rmbshape{12}{\magstep1}
-\setfont\secit\itbshape{10}{\magstep2}
-\setfont\secsl\slbshape{10}{\magstep2}
-\setfont\sectt\ttbshape{12}{\magstep1}
-\setfont\secttsl\ttslshape{10}{\magstep2}
-\setfont\secsf\sfbshape{12}{\magstep1}
-\let\secbf\secrm
-\setfont\secsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep2}
-\font\seci=cmmi12 scaled \magstep1
-\font\secsy=cmsy10 scaled \magstep2
-
-% \setfont\ssecrm\bxshape{10}{\magstep1}    % This size an font looked bad.
-% \setfont\ssecit\itshape{10}{\magstep1}    % The letters were too crowded.
-% \setfont\ssecsl\slshape{10}{\magstep1}
-% \setfont\ssectt\ttshape{10}{\magstep1}
-% \setfont\ssecsf\sfshape{10}{\magstep1}
-
-%\setfont\ssecrm\bfshape{10}{1315}      % Note the use of cmb rather than cmbx.
-%\setfont\ssecit\itshape{10}{1315}      % Also, the size is a little larger than
-%\setfont\ssecsl\slshape{10}{1315}      % being scaled magstep1.
-%\setfont\ssectt\ttshape{10}{1315}
-%\setfont\ssecsf\sfshape{10}{1315}
-
-%\let\ssecbf=\ssecrm
-
-% Subsection fonts (13.15pt).
-\setfont\ssecrm\rmbshape{12}{\magstephalf}
-\setfont\ssecit\itbshape{10}{1315}
-\setfont\ssecsl\slbshape{10}{1315}
-\setfont\ssectt\ttbshape{12}{\magstephalf}
-\setfont\ssecttsl\ttslshape{10}{1315}
-\setfont\ssecsf\sfbshape{12}{\magstephalf}
-\let\ssecbf\ssecrm
-\setfont\ssecsc\scbshape{10}{\magstep1}
-\font\sseci=cmmi12 scaled \magstephalf
-\font\ssecsy=cmsy10 scaled 1315
-% The smallcaps and symbol fonts should actually be scaled \magstep1.5,
-% but that is not a standard magnification.
-
-% In order for the font changes to affect most math symbols and letters,
-% we have to define the \textfont of the standard families.  Since
-% texinfo doesn't allow for producing subscripts and superscripts, we
-% don't bother to reset \scriptfont and \scriptscriptfont (which would
-% also require loading a lot more fonts).
-%
-\def\resetmathfonts{%
-  \textfont0 = \tenrm \textfont1 = \teni \textfont2 = \tensy
-  \textfont\itfam = \tenit \textfont\slfam = \tensl \textfont\bffam = \tenbf
-  \textfont\ttfam = \tentt \textfont\sffam = \tensf
-}
-
-
-% The font-changing commands redefine the meanings of \tenSTYLE, instead
-% of just \STYLE.  We do this so that font changes will continue to work
-% in math mode, where it is the current \fam that is relevant in most
-% cases, not the current font.  Plain TeX does \def\bf{\fam=\bffam
-% \tenbf}, for example.  By redefining \tenbf, we obviate the need to
-% redefine \bf itself.
-\def\textfonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\textrm \let\tenit=\textit \let\tensl=\textsl
-  \let\tenbf=\textbf \let\tentt=\texttt \let\smallcaps=\textsc
-  \let\tensf=\textsf \let\teni=\texti \let\tensy=\textsy \let\tenttsl=\textttsl
-  \resetmathfonts}
-\def\titlefonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\titlerm \let\tenit=\titleit \let\tensl=\titlesl
-  \let\tenbf=\titlebf \let\tentt=\titlett \let\smallcaps=\titlesc
-  \let\tensf=\titlesf \let\teni=\titlei \let\tensy=\titlesy
-  \let\tenttsl=\titlettsl
-  \resetmathfonts \setleading{25pt}}
-\def\titlefont#1{{\titlefonts\rm #1}}
-\def\chapfonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\chaprm \let\tenit=\chapit \let\tensl=\chapsl
-  \let\tenbf=\chapbf \let\tentt=\chaptt \let\smallcaps=\chapsc
-  \let\tensf=\chapsf \let\teni=\chapi \let\tensy=\chapsy \let\tenttsl=\chapttsl
-  \resetmathfonts \setleading{19pt}}
-\def\secfonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\secrm \let\tenit=\secit \let\tensl=\secsl
-  \let\tenbf=\secbf \let\tentt=\sectt \let\smallcaps=\secsc
-  \let\tensf=\secsf \let\teni=\seci \let\tensy=\secsy \let\tenttsl=\secttsl
-  \resetmathfonts \setleading{16pt}}
-\def\subsecfonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\ssecrm \let\tenit=\ssecit \let\tensl=\ssecsl
-  \let\tenbf=\ssecbf \let\tentt=\ssectt \let\smallcaps=\ssecsc
-  \let\tensf=\ssecsf \let\teni=\sseci \let\tensy=\ssecsy \let\tenttsl=\ssecttsl
-  \resetmathfonts \setleading{15pt}}
-\let\subsubsecfonts = \subsecfonts % Maybe make sssec fonts scaled magstephalf?
-\def\indexfonts{%
-  \let\tenrm=\indrm \let\tenit=\indit \let\tensl=\indsl
-  \let\tenbf=\indbf \let\tentt=\indtt \let\smallcaps=\indsc
-  \let\tensf=\indsf \let\teni=\indi \let\tensy=\indsy \let\tenttsl=\indttsl
-  \resetmathfonts \setleading{12pt}}
-
-% Set up the default fonts, so we can use them for creating boxes.
-%
-\textfonts
-
-% Define these so they can be easily changed for other fonts.
-\def\angleleft{$\langle$}
-\def\angleright{$\rangle$}
-
-% Count depth in font-changes, for error checks
-\newcount\fontdepth \fontdepth=0
-
-% Fonts for short table of contents.
-\setfont\shortcontrm\rmshape{12}{1000}
-\setfont\shortcontbf\bxshape{12}{1000}
-\setfont\shortcontsl\slshape{12}{1000}
-
-%% Add scribe-like font environments, plus @l for inline lisp (usually sans
-%% serif) and @ii for TeX italic
-
-% \smartitalic{ARG} outputs arg in italics, followed by an italic correction
-% unless the following character is such as not to need one.
-\def\smartitalicx{\ifx\next,\else\ifx\next-\else\ifx\next.\else\/\fi\fi\fi}
-\def\smartslanted#1{{\sl #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
-\def\smartitalic#1{{\it #1}\futurelet\next\smartitalicx}
-
-\let\i=\smartitalic
-\let\var=\smartslanted
-\let\dfn=\smartslanted
-\let\emph=\smartitalic
-\let\cite=\smartslanted
-
-\def\b#1{{\bf #1}}
-\let\strong=\b
-
-% We can't just use \exhyphenpenalty, because that only has effect at
-% the end of a paragraph.  Restore normal hyphenation at the end of the
-% group within which \nohyphenation is presumably called.
-%
-\def\nohyphenation{\hyphenchar\font = -1  \aftergroup\restorehyphenation}
-\def\restorehyphenation{\hyphenchar\font = `- }
-
-\def\t#1{%
-  {\tt \rawbackslash \frenchspacing #1}%
-  \null
-}
-\let\ttfont=\t
-\def\samp#1{`\tclose{#1}'\null}
-\setfont\smallrm\rmshape{8}{1000}
-\font\smallsy=cmsy9
-\def\key#1{{\smallrm\textfont2=\smallsy \leavevmode\hbox{%
-  \raise0.4pt\hbox{\angleleft}\kern-.08em\vtop{%
-    \vbox{\hrule\kern-0.4pt
-     \hbox{\raise0.4pt\hbox{\vphantom{\angleleft}}#1}}%
-    \kern-0.4pt\hrule}%
-  \kern-.06em\raise0.4pt\hbox{\angleright}}}}
-% The old definition, with no lozenge:
-%\def\key #1{{\ttsl \nohyphenation \uppercase{#1}}\null}
-\def\ctrl #1{{\tt \rawbackslash \hat}#1}
-
-% @file, @option are the same as @samp.
-\let\file=\samp
-\let\option=\samp
-
-% @code is a modification of @t,
-% which makes spaces the same size as normal in the surrounding text.
-\def\tclose#1{%
-  {%
-    % Change normal interword space to be same as for the current font.
-    \spaceskip = \fontdimen2\font
-    %
-    % Switch to typewriter.
-    \tt
-    %
-    % But `\ ' produces the large typewriter interword space.
-    \def\ {{\spaceskip = 0pt{} }}%
-    %
-    % Turn off hyphenation.
-    \nohyphenation
-    %
-    \rawbackslash
-    \frenchspacing
-    #1%
-  }%
-  \null
-}
-
-% We *must* turn on hyphenation at `-' and `_' in \code.
-% Otherwise, it is too hard to avoid overfull hboxes
-% in the Emacs manual, the Library manual, etc.
-
-% Unfortunately, TeX uses one parameter (\hyphenchar) to control
-% both hyphenation at - and hyphenation within words.
-% We must therefore turn them both off (\tclose does that)
-% and arrange explicitly to hyphenate at a dash.
-%  -- rms.
-{
-  \catcode`\-=\active
-  \catcode`\_=\active
-  %
-  \global\def\code{\begingroup
-    \catcode`\-=\active \let-\codedash
-    \catcode`\_=\active \let_\codeunder
-    \codex
-  }
-  %
-  % If we end up with any active - characters when handling the index,
-  % just treat them as a normal -.
-  \global\def\indexbreaks{\catcode`\-=\active \let-\realdash}
-}
-
-\def\realdash{-}
-\def\codedash{-\discretionary{}{}{}}
-\def\codeunder{\ifusingtt{\normalunderscore\discretionary{}{}{}}{\_}}
-\def\codex #1{\tclose{#1}\endgroup}
-
-%\let\exp=\tclose  %Was temporary
-
-% @kbd is like @code, except that if the argument is just one @key command,
-% then @kbd has no effect.
-
-% @kbdinputstyle -- arg is `distinct' (@kbd uses slanted tty font always),
-%   `example' (@kbd uses ttsl only inside of @example and friends),
-%   or `code' (@kbd uses normal tty font always).
-\def\kbdinputstyle{\parsearg\kbdinputstylexxx}
-\def\kbdinputstylexxx#1{%
-  \def\arg{#1}%
-  \ifx\arg\worddistinct
-    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\ttsl}\gdef\kbdfont{\ttsl}%
-  \else\ifx\arg\wordexample
-    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\ttsl}\gdef\kbdfont{\tt}%
-  \else\ifx\arg\wordcode
-    \gdef\kbdexamplefont{\tt}\gdef\kbdfont{\tt}%
-  \fi\fi\fi
-}
-\def\worddistinct{distinct}
-\def\wordexample{example}
-\def\wordcode{code}
-
-% Default is kbdinputdistinct.  (Too much of a hassle to call the macro,
-% the catcodes are wrong for parsearg to work.)
-\gdef\kbdexamplefont{\ttsl}\gdef\kbdfont{\ttsl}
-
-\def\xkey{\key}
-\def\kbdfoo#1#2#3\par{\def\one{#1}\def\three{#3}\def\threex{??}%
-\ifx\one\xkey\ifx\threex\three \key{#2}%
-\else{\tclose{\kbdfont\look}}\fi
-\else{\tclose{\kbdfont\look}}\fi}
-
-% For @url, @env, @command quotes seem unnecessary, so use \code.
-\let\url=\code
-\let\env=\code
-\let\command=\code
-
-% @uref (abbreviation for `urlref') takes an optional second argument
-% specifying the text to display.  First (mandatory) arg is the url.
-% Perhaps eventually put in a hypertex \special here.
-% 
-\def\uref#1{\urefxxx #1,,\finish}
-\def\urefxxx#1,#2,#3\finish{%
-  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}%
-  \ifdim\wd0 > 0pt
-    \unhbox0\ (\code{#1})%
-  \else
-    \code{#1}%
-  \fi
-}
-
-% rms does not like the angle brackets --karl, 17may97.
-% So now @email is just like @uref.
-%\def\email#1{\angleleft{\tt #1}\angleright}
-\let\email=\uref
-
-% Check if we are currently using a typewriter font.  Since all the
-% Computer Modern typewriter fonts have zero interword stretch (and
-% shrink), and it is reasonable to expect all typewriter fonts to have
-% this property, we can check that font parameter.
-%
-\def\ifmonospace{\ifdim\fontdimen3\font=0pt }
-
-% Typeset a dimension, e.g., `in' or `pt'.  The only reason for the
-% argument is to make the input look right: @dmn{pt} instead of @dmn{}pt.
-%
-\def\dmn#1{\thinspace #1}
-
-\def\kbd#1{\def\look{#1}\expandafter\kbdfoo\look??\par}
-
-% @l was never documented to mean ``switch to the Lisp font'',
-% and it is not used as such in any manual I can find.  We need it for
-% Polish suppressed-l.  --karl, 22sep96.
-%\def\l#1{{\li #1}\null}
-
-% Explicit font changes: @r, @sc, undocumented @ii.
-\def\r#1{{\rm #1}}              % roman font
-\def\sc#1{{\smallcaps#1}}       % smallcaps font
-\def\ii#1{{\it #1}}             % italic font
-
-% @acronym downcases the argument and prints in smallcaps.
-\def\acronym#1{{\smallcaps \lowercase{#1}}}
-
-% @pounds{} is a sterling sign.
-\def\pounds{{\it\$}}
-
-
-\message{page headings,}
-
-\newskip\titlepagetopglue \titlepagetopglue = 1.5in
-\newskip\titlepagebottomglue \titlepagebottomglue = 2pc
-
-% First the title page.  Must do @settitle before @titlepage.
-\newif\ifseenauthor
-\newif\iffinishedtitlepage
-
-% Do an implicit @contents or @shortcontents after @end titlepage if the
-% user says @setcontentsaftertitlepage or @setshortcontentsaftertitlepage.
-% 
-\newif\ifsetcontentsaftertitlepage
- \let\setcontentsaftertitlepage = \setcontentsaftertitlepagetrue
-\newif\ifsetshortcontentsaftertitlepage
- \let\setshortcontentsaftertitlepage = \setshortcontentsaftertitlepagetrue
-
-\def\shorttitlepage{\parsearg\shorttitlepagezzz}
-\def\shorttitlepagezzz #1{\begingroup\hbox{}\vskip 1.5in \chaprm \centerline{#1}%
-        \endgroup\page\hbox{}\page}
-
-\def\titlepage{\begingroup \parindent=0pt \textfonts
-   \let\subtitlerm=\tenrm
-   \def\subtitlefont{\subtitlerm \normalbaselineskip = 13pt \normalbaselines}%
-   %
-   \def\authorfont{\authorrm \normalbaselineskip = 16pt \normalbaselines}%
-   %
-   % Leave some space at the very top of the page.
-   \vglue\titlepagetopglue
-   %
-   % Now you can print the title using @title.
-   \def\title{\parsearg\titlezzz}%
-   \def\titlezzz##1{\leftline{\titlefonts\rm ##1}
-                    % print a rule at the page bottom also.
-                    \finishedtitlepagefalse
-                    \vskip4pt \hrule height 4pt width \hsize \vskip4pt}%
-   % No rule at page bottom unless we print one at the top with @title.
-   \finishedtitlepagetrue
-   %
-   % Now you can put text using @subtitle.
-   \def\subtitle{\parsearg\subtitlezzz}%
-   \def\subtitlezzz##1{{\subtitlefont \rightline{##1}}}%
-   %
-   % @author should come last, but may come many times.
-   \def\author{\parsearg\authorzzz}%
-   \def\authorzzz##1{\ifseenauthor\else\vskip 0pt plus 1filll\seenauthortrue\fi
-      {\authorfont \leftline{##1}}}%
-   %
-   % Most title ``pages'' are actually two pages long, with space
-   % at the top of the second.  We don't want the ragged left on the second.
-   \let\oldpage = \page
-   \def\page{%
-      \iffinishedtitlepage\else
-         \finishtitlepage
-      \fi
-      \oldpage
-      \let\page = \oldpage
-      \hbox{}}%
-%   \def\page{\oldpage \hbox{}}
-}
-
-\def\Etitlepage{%
-   \iffinishedtitlepage\else
-      \finishtitlepage
-   \fi
-   % It is important to do the page break before ending the group,
-   % because the headline and footline are only empty inside the group.
-   % If we use the new definition of \page, we always get a blank page
-   % after the title page, which we certainly don't want.
-   \oldpage
-   \endgroup
-   %
-   % If they want short, they certainly want long too.
-   \ifsetshortcontentsaftertitlepage
-     \shortcontents
-     \contents
-     \global\let\shortcontents = \relax
-     \global\let\contents = \relax
-   \fi
-   %
-   \ifsetcontentsaftertitlepage
-     \contents
-     \global\let\contents = \relax
-     \global\let\shortcontents = \relax
-   \fi
-   %
-   \HEADINGSon
-}
-
-\def\finishtitlepage{%
-   \vskip4pt \hrule height 2pt width \hsize
-   \vskip\titlepagebottomglue
-   \finishedtitlepagetrue
-}
-
-%%% Set up page headings and footings.
-
-\let\thispage=\folio
-
-\newtoks\evenheadline    % headline on even pages
-\newtoks\oddheadline     % headline on odd pages
-\newtoks\evenfootline    % footline on even pages
-\newtoks\oddfootline     % footline on odd pages
-
-% Now make Tex use those variables
-\headline={{\textfonts\rm \ifodd\pageno \the\oddheadline
-                            \else \the\evenheadline \fi}}
-\footline={{\textfonts\rm \ifodd\pageno \the\oddfootline
-                            \else \the\evenfootline \fi}\HEADINGShook}
-\let\HEADINGShook=\relax
-
-% Commands to set those variables.
-% For example, this is what  @headings on  does
-% @evenheading @thistitle|@thispage|@thischapter
-% @oddheading @thischapter|@thispage|@thistitle
-% @evenfooting @thisfile||
-% @oddfooting ||@thisfile
-
-\def\evenheading{\parsearg\evenheadingxxx}
-\def\oddheading{\parsearg\oddheadingxxx}
-\def\everyheading{\parsearg\everyheadingxxx}
-
-\def\evenfooting{\parsearg\evenfootingxxx}
-\def\oddfooting{\parsearg\oddfootingxxx}
-\def\everyfooting{\parsearg\everyfootingxxx}
-
-{\catcode`\@=0 %
-
-\gdef\evenheadingxxx #1{\evenheadingyyy #1@|@|@|@|\finish}
-\gdef\evenheadingyyy #1@|#2@|#3@|#4\finish{%
-\global\evenheadline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
-
-\gdef\oddheadingxxx #1{\oddheadingyyy #1@|@|@|@|\finish}
-\gdef\oddheadingyyy #1@|#2@|#3@|#4\finish{%
-\global\oddheadline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
-
-\gdef\everyheadingxxx#1{\oddheadingxxx{#1}\evenheadingxxx{#1}}%
-
-\gdef\evenfootingxxx #1{\evenfootingyyy #1@|@|@|@|\finish}
-\gdef\evenfootingyyy #1@|#2@|#3@|#4\finish{%
-\global\evenfootline={\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}}
-
-\gdef\oddfootingxxx #1{\oddfootingyyy #1@|@|@|@|\finish}
-\gdef\oddfootingyyy #1@|#2@|#3@|#4\finish{%
-  \global\oddfootline = {\rlap{\centerline{#2}}\line{#1\hfil#3}}%
-  %
-  % Leave some space for the footline.  Hopefully ok to assume
-  % @evenfooting will not be used by itself.
-  \global\advance\pageheight by -\baselineskip
-  \global\advance\vsize by -\baselineskip
-}
-
-\gdef\everyfootingxxx#1{\oddfootingxxx{#1}\evenfootingxxx{#1}}
-%
-}% unbind the catcode of @.
-
-% @headings double      turns headings on for double-sided printing.
-% @headings single      turns headings on for single-sided printing.
-% @headings off         turns them off.
-% @headings on          same as @headings double, retained for compatibility.
-% @headings after       turns on double-sided headings after this page.
-% @headings doubleafter turns on double-sided headings after this page.
-% @headings singleafter turns on single-sided headings after this page.
-% By default, they are off at the start of a document,
-% and turned `on' after @end titlepage.
-
-\def\headings #1 {\csname HEADINGS#1\endcsname}
-
-\def\HEADINGSoff{
-\global\evenheadline={\hfil} \global\evenfootline={\hfil}
-\global\oddheadline={\hfil} \global\oddfootline={\hfil}}
-\HEADINGSoff
-% When we turn headings on, set the page number to 1.
-% For double-sided printing, put current file name in lower left corner,
-% chapter name on inside top of right hand pages, document
-% title on inside top of left hand pages, and page numbers on outside top
-% edge of all pages.
-\def\HEADINGSdouble{
-\global\pageno=1
-\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
-\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
-\global\evenheadline={\line{\folio\hfil\thistitle}}
-\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chapoddpage
-}
-\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
-
-% For single-sided printing, chapter title goes across top left of page,
-% page number on top right.
-\def\HEADINGSsingle{
-\global\pageno=1
-\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
-\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
-\global\evenheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
-}
-\def\HEADINGSon{\HEADINGSdouble}
-
-\def\HEADINGSafter{\let\HEADINGShook=\HEADINGSdoublex}
-\let\HEADINGSdoubleafter=\HEADINGSafter
-\def\HEADINGSdoublex{%
-\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
-\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
-\global\evenheadline={\line{\folio\hfil\thistitle}}
-\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chapoddpage
-}
-
-\def\HEADINGSsingleafter{\let\HEADINGShook=\HEADINGSsinglex}
-\def\HEADINGSsinglex{%
-\global\evenfootline={\hfil}
-\global\oddfootline={\hfil}
-\global\evenheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\oddheadline={\line{\thischapter\hfil\folio}}
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
-}
-
-% Subroutines used in generating headings
-% Produces Day Month Year style of output.
-\def\today{\number\day\space
-\ifcase\month\or
-January\or February\or March\or April\or May\or June\or
-July\or August\or September\or October\or November\or December\fi
-\space\number\year}
-
-% Use this if you want the Month Day, Year style of output.
-%\def\today{\ifcase\month\or
-%January\or February\or March\or April\or May\or June\or
-%July\or August\or September\or October\or November\or December\fi
-%\space\number\day, \number\year}
-
-% @settitle line...  specifies the title of the document, for headings
-% It generates no output of its own
-
-\def\thistitle{No Title}
-\def\settitle{\parsearg\settitlezzz}
-\def\settitlezzz #1{\gdef\thistitle{#1}}
-
-
-\message{tables,}
-% Tables -- @table, @ftable, @vtable, @item(x), @kitem(x), @xitem(x).
-
-% default indentation of table text
-\newdimen\tableindent \tableindent=.8in
-% default indentation of @itemize and @enumerate text
-\newdimen\itemindent  \itemindent=.3in
-% margin between end of table item and start of table text.
-\newdimen\itemmargin  \itemmargin=.1in
-
-% used internally for \itemindent minus \itemmargin
-\newdimen\itemmax
-
-% Note @table, @vtable, and @vtable define @item, @itemx, etc., with
-% these defs.
-% They also define \itemindex
-% to index the item name in whatever manner is desired (perhaps none).
-
-\newif\ifitemxneedsnegativevskip
-
-\def\itemxpar{\par\ifitemxneedsnegativevskip\nobreak\vskip-\parskip\nobreak\fi}
-
-\def\internalBitem{\smallbreak \parsearg\itemzzz}
-\def\internalBitemx{\itemxpar \parsearg\itemzzz}
-
-\def\internalBxitem "#1"{\def\xitemsubtopix{#1} \smallbreak \parsearg\xitemzzz}
-\def\internalBxitemx "#1"{\def\xitemsubtopix{#1} \itemxpar \parsearg\xitemzzz}
-
-\def\internalBkitem{\smallbreak \parsearg\kitemzzz}
-\def\internalBkitemx{\itemxpar \parsearg\kitemzzz}
-
-\def\kitemzzz #1{\dosubind {kw}{\code{#1}}{for {\bf \lastfunction}}%
-                 \itemzzz {#1}}
-
-\def\xitemzzz #1{\dosubind {kw}{\code{#1}}{for {\bf \xitemsubtopic}}%
-                 \itemzzz {#1}}
-
-\def\itemzzz #1{\begingroup %
-  \advance\hsize by -\rightskip
-  \advance\hsize by -\tableindent
-  \setbox0=\hbox{\itemfont{#1}}%
-  \itemindex{#1}%
-  \nobreak % This prevents a break before @itemx.
-  %
-  % If the item text does not fit in the space we have, put it on a line
-  % by itself, and do not allow a page break either before or after that
-  % line.  We do not start a paragraph here because then if the next
-  % command is, e.g., @kindex, the whatsit would get put into the
-  % horizontal list on a line by itself, resulting in extra blank space.
-  \ifdim \wd0>\itemmax
-    %
-    % Make this a paragraph so we get the \parskip glue and wrapping,
-    % but leave it ragged-right.
-    \begingroup
-      \advance\leftskip by-\tableindent
-      \advance\hsize by\tableindent
-      \advance\rightskip by0pt plus1fil
-      \leavevmode\unhbox0\par
-    \endgroup
-    %
-    % We're going to be starting a paragraph, but we don't want the
-    % \parskip glue -- logically it's part of the @item we just started.
-    \nobreak \vskip-\parskip
-    %
-    % Stop a page break at the \parskip glue coming up.  Unfortunately
-    % we can't prevent a possible page break at the following
-    % \baselineskip glue.
-    \nobreak
-    \endgroup
-    \itemxneedsnegativevskipfalse
-  \else
-    % The item text fits into the space.  Start a paragraph, so that the
-    % following text (if any) will end up on the same line.  
-    \noindent
-    % Do this with kerns and \unhbox so that if there is a footnote in
-    % the item text, it can migrate to the main vertical list and
-    % eventually be printed.
-    \nobreak\kern-\tableindent
-    \dimen0 = \itemmax  \advance\dimen0 by \itemmargin \advance\dimen0 by -\wd0
-    \unhbox0
-    \nobreak\kern\dimen0
-    \endgroup
-    \itemxneedsnegativevskiptrue
-  \fi
-}
-
-\def\item{\errmessage{@item while not in a table}}
-\def\itemx{\errmessage{@itemx while not in a table}}
-\def\kitem{\errmessage{@kitem while not in a table}}
-\def\kitemx{\errmessage{@kitemx while not in a table}}
-\def\xitem{\errmessage{@xitem while not in a table}}
-\def\xitemx{\errmessage{@xitemx while not in a table}}
-
-% Contains a kludge to get @end[description] to work.
-\def\description{\tablez{\dontindex}{1}{}{}{}{}}
-
-% @table, @ftable, @vtable.
-\def\table{\begingroup\inENV\obeylines\obeyspaces\tablex}
-{\obeylines\obeyspaces%
-\gdef\tablex #1^^M{%
-\tabley\dontindex#1        \endtabley}}
-
-\def\ftable{\begingroup\inENV\obeylines\obeyspaces\ftablex}
-{\obeylines\obeyspaces%
-\gdef\ftablex #1^^M{%
-\tabley\fnitemindex#1        \endtabley
-\def\Eftable{\endgraf\afterenvbreak\endgroup}%
-\let\Etable=\relax}}
-
-\def\vtable{\begingroup\inENV\obeylines\obeyspaces\vtablex}
-{\obeylines\obeyspaces%
-\gdef\vtablex #1^^M{%
-\tabley\vritemindex#1        \endtabley
-\def\Evtable{\endgraf\afterenvbreak\endgroup}%
-\let\Etable=\relax}}
-
-\def\dontindex #1{}
-\def\fnitemindex #1{\doind {fn}{\code{#1}}}%
-\def\vritemindex #1{\doind {vr}{\code{#1}}}%
-
-{\obeyspaces %
-\gdef\tabley#1#2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7\endtabley{\endgroup%
-\tablez{#1}{#2}{#3}{#4}{#5}{#6}}}
-
-\def\tablez #1#2#3#4#5#6{%
-\aboveenvbreak %
-\begingroup %
-\def\Edescription{\Etable}% Necessary kludge.
-\let\itemindex=#1%
-\ifnum 0#3>0 \advance \leftskip by #3\mil \fi %
-\ifnum 0#4>0 \tableindent=#4\mil \fi %
-\ifnum 0#5>0 \advance \rightskip by #5\mil \fi %
-\def\itemfont{#2}%
-\itemmax=\tableindent %
-\advance \itemmax by -\itemmargin %
-\advance \leftskip by \tableindent %
-\exdentamount=\tableindent
-\parindent = 0pt
-\parskip = \smallskipamount
-\ifdim \parskip=0pt \parskip=2pt \fi%
-\def\Etable{\endgraf\afterenvbreak\endgroup}%
-\let\item = \internalBitem %
-\let\itemx = \internalBitemx %
-\let\kitem = \internalBkitem %
-\let\kitemx = \internalBkitemx %
-\let\xitem = \internalBxitem %
-\let\xitemx = \internalBxitemx %
-}
-
-% This is the counter used by @enumerate, which is really @itemize
-
-\newcount \itemno
-
-\def\itemize{\parsearg\itemizezzz}
-
-\def\itemizezzz #1{%
-  \begingroup % ended by the @end itemize
-  \itemizey {#1}{\Eitemize}
-}
-
-\def\itemizey #1#2{%
-\aboveenvbreak %
-\itemmax=\itemindent %
-\advance \itemmax by -\itemmargin %
-\advance \leftskip by \itemindent %
-\exdentamount=\itemindent
-\parindent = 0pt %
-\parskip = \smallskipamount %
-\ifdim \parskip=0pt \parskip=2pt \fi%
-\def#2{\endgraf\afterenvbreak\endgroup}%
-\def\itemcontents{#1}%
-\let\item=\itemizeitem}
-
-% Set sfcode to normal for the chars that usually have another value.
-% These are `.?!:;,'
-\def\frenchspacing{\sfcode46=1000 \sfcode63=1000 \sfcode33=1000
-  \sfcode58=1000 \sfcode59=1000 \sfcode44=1000 }
-
-% \splitoff TOKENS\endmark defines \first to be the first token in
-% TOKENS, and \rest to be the remainder.
-%
-\def\splitoff#1#2\endmark{\def\first{#1}\def\rest{#2}}%
-
-% Allow an optional argument of an uppercase letter, lowercase letter,
-% or number, to specify the first label in the enumerated list.  No
-% argument is the same as `1'.
-%
-\def\enumerate{\parsearg\enumeratezzz}
-\def\enumeratezzz #1{\enumeratey #1  \endenumeratey}
-\def\enumeratey #1 #2\endenumeratey{%
-  \begingroup % ended by the @end enumerate
-  %
-  % If we were given no argument, pretend we were given `1'.
-  \def\thearg{#1}%
-  \ifx\thearg\empty \def\thearg{1}\fi
-  %
-  % Detect if the argument is a single token.  If so, it might be a
-  % letter.  Otherwise, the only valid thing it can be is a number.
-  % (We will always have one token, because of the test we just made.
-  % This is a good thing, since \splitoff doesn't work given nothing at
-  % all -- the first parameter is undelimited.)
-  \expandafter\splitoff\thearg\endmark
-  \ifx\rest\empty
-    % Only one token in the argument.  It could still be anything.
-    % A ``lowercase letter'' is one whose \lccode is nonzero.
-    % An ``uppercase letter'' is one whose \lccode is both nonzero, and
-    %   not equal to itself.
-    % Otherwise, we assume it's a number.
-    %
-    % We need the \relax at the end of the \ifnum lines to stop TeX from
-    % continuing to look for a <number>.
-    %
-    \ifnum\lccode\expandafter`\thearg=0\relax
-      \numericenumerate % a number (we hope)
-    \else
-      % It's a letter.
-      \ifnum\lccode\expandafter`\thearg=\expandafter`\thearg\relax
-        \lowercaseenumerate % lowercase letter
-      \else
-        \uppercaseenumerate % uppercase letter
-      \fi
-    \fi
-  \else
-    % Multiple tokens in the argument.  We hope it's a number.
-    \numericenumerate
-  \fi
-}
-
-% An @enumerate whose labels are integers.  The starting integer is
-% given in \thearg.
-%
-\def\numericenumerate{%
-  \itemno = \thearg
-  \startenumeration{\the\itemno}%
-}
-
-% The starting (lowercase) letter is in \thearg.
-\def\lowercaseenumerate{%
-  \itemno = \expandafter`\thearg
-  \startenumeration{%
-    % Be sure we're not beyond the end of the alphabet.
-    \ifnum\itemno=0
-      \errmessage{No more lowercase letters in @enumerate; get a bigger
-                  alphabet}%
-    \fi
-    \char\lccode\itemno
-  }%
-}
-
-% The starting (uppercase) letter is in \thearg.
-\def\uppercaseenumerate{%
-  \itemno = \expandafter`\thearg
-  \startenumeration{%
-    % Be sure we're not beyond the end of the alphabet.
-    \ifnum\itemno=0
-      \errmessage{No more uppercase letters in @enumerate; get a bigger
-                  alphabet}
-    \fi
-    \char\uccode\itemno
-  }%
-}
-
-% Call itemizey, adding a period to the first argument and supplying the
-% common last two arguments.  Also subtract one from the initial value in
-% \itemno, since @item increments \itemno.
-%
-\def\startenumeration#1{%
-  \advance\itemno by -1
-  \itemizey{#1.}\Eenumerate\flushcr
-}
-
-% @alphaenumerate and @capsenumerate are abbreviations for giving an arg
-% to @enumerate.
-%
-\def\alphaenumerate{\enumerate{a}}
-\def\capsenumerate{\enumerate{A}}
-\def\Ealphaenumerate{\Eenumerate}
-\def\Ecapsenumerate{\Eenumerate}
-
-% Definition of @item while inside @itemize.
-
-\def\itemizeitem{%
-\advance\itemno by 1
-{\let\par=\endgraf \smallbreak}%
-\ifhmode \errmessage{In hmode at itemizeitem}\fi
-{\parskip=0in \hskip 0pt
-\hbox to 0pt{\hss \itemcontents\hskip \itemmargin}%
-\vadjust{\penalty 1200}}%
-\flushcr}
-
-% @multitable macros
-% Amy Hendrickson, 8/18/94, 3/6/96
-%
-% @multitable ... @end multitable will make as many columns as desired.
-% Contents of each column will wrap at width given in preamble.  Width
-% can be specified either with sample text given in a template line,
-% or in percent of \hsize, the current width of text on page.
-
-% Table can continue over pages but will only break between lines.
-
-% To make preamble:
-%
-% Either define widths of columns in terms of percent of \hsize:
-%   @multitable @columnfractions .25 .3 .45
-%   @item ...
-%
-%   Numbers following @columnfractions are the percent of the total
-%   current hsize to be used for each column. You may use as many
-%   columns as desired.
-
-
-% Or use a template:
-%   @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template} {Column 3 template}
-%   @item ...
-%   using the widest term desired in each column.
-%
-% For those who want to use more than one line's worth of words in
-% the preamble, break the line within one argument and it
-% will parse correctly, i.e.,
-%
-%     @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template} {Column 3
-%      template}
-% Not:
-%     @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template}
-%      {Column 3 template}
-
-% Each new table line starts with @item, each subsequent new column
-% starts with @tab. Empty columns may be produced by supplying @tab's
-% with nothing between them for as many times as empty columns are needed,
-% ie, @tab@tab@tab will produce two empty columns.
-
-% @item, @tab, @multitable or @end multitable do not need to be on their
-% own lines, but it will not hurt if they are.
-
-% Sample multitable:
-
-%   @multitable {Column 1 template} {Column 2 template} {Column 3 template}
-%   @item first col stuff @tab second col stuff @tab third col
-%   @item
-%   first col stuff
-%   @tab
-%   second col stuff
-%   @tab
-%   third col
-%   @item first col stuff @tab second col stuff
-%   @tab Many paragraphs of text may be used in any column.
-%
-%         They will wrap at the width determined by the template.
-%   @item@tab@tab This will be in third column.
-%   @end multitable
-
-% Default dimensions may be reset by user.
-% @multitableparskip is vertical space between paragraphs in table.
-% @multitableparindent is paragraph indent in table.
-% @multitablecolmargin is horizontal space to be left between columns.
-% @multitablelinespace is space to leave between table items, baseline
-%                                                            to baseline.
-%   0pt means it depends on current normal line spacing.
-%
-\newskip\multitableparskip
-\newskip\multitableparindent
-\newdimen\multitablecolspace
-\newskip\multitablelinespace
-\multitableparskip=0pt
-\multitableparindent=6pt
-\multitablecolspace=12pt
-\multitablelinespace=0pt
-
-% Macros used to set up halign preamble:
-% 
-\let\endsetuptable\relax
-\def\xendsetuptable{\endsetuptable}
-\let\columnfractions\relax
-\def\xcolumnfractions{\columnfractions}
-\newif\ifsetpercent
-
-% #1 is the part of the @columnfraction before the decimal point, which
-% is presumably either 0 or the empty string (but we don't check, we
-% just throw it away).  #2 is the decimal part, which we use as the
-% percent of \hsize for this column.
-\def\pickupwholefraction#1.#2 {%
-  \global\advance\colcount by 1
-  \expandafter\xdef\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname{.#2\hsize}%
-  \setuptable
-}
-
-\newcount\colcount
-\def\setuptable#1{%
-  \def\firstarg{#1}%
-  \ifx\firstarg\xendsetuptable
-    \let\go = \relax
-  \else
-    \ifx\firstarg\xcolumnfractions
-      \global\setpercenttrue
-    \else
-      \ifsetpercent
-         \let\go\pickupwholefraction
-      \else
-         \global\advance\colcount by 1
-         \setbox0=\hbox{#1\unskip }% Add a normal word space as a separator;
-                            % typically that is always in the input, anyway.
-         \expandafter\xdef\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname{\the\wd0}%
-      \fi
-    \fi
-    \ifx\go\pickupwholefraction
-      % Put the argument back for the \pickupwholefraction call, so
-      % we'll always have a period there to be parsed.
-      \def\go{\pickupwholefraction#1}%
-    \else
-      \let\go = \setuptable
-    \fi%
-  \fi
-  \go
-}
-
-% multitable syntax
-\def\tab{&\hskip1sp\relax} % 2/2/96
-                           % tiny skip here makes sure this column space is
-                           % maintained, even if it is never used.
-
-% @multitable ... @end multitable definitions:
-%
-\def\multitable{\parsearg\dotable}
-\def\dotable#1{\bgroup
-  \vskip\parskip
-  \let\item\crcr
-  \tolerance=9500
-  \hbadness=9500
-  \setmultitablespacing
-  \parskip=\multitableparskip
-  \parindent=\multitableparindent
-  \overfullrule=0pt
-  \global\colcount=0
-  \def\Emultitable{\global\setpercentfalse\cr\egroup\egroup}%
-  %
-  % To parse everything between @multitable and @item:
-  \setuptable#1 \endsetuptable
-  %
-  % \everycr will reset column counter, \colcount, at the end of
-  % each line. Every column entry will cause \colcount to advance by one.
-  % The table preamble
-  % looks at the current \colcount to find the correct column width.
-  \everycr{\noalign{%
-  %
-  % \filbreak%% keeps underfull box messages off when table breaks over pages.
-  % Maybe so, but it also creates really weird page breaks when the table
-  % breaks over pages. Wouldn't \vfil be better?  Wait until the problem
-  % manifests itself, so it can be fixed for real --karl.
-    \global\colcount=0\relax}}%
-  %
-  % This preamble sets up a generic column definition, which will
-  % be used as many times as user calls for columns.
-  % \vtop will set a single line and will also let text wrap and
-  % continue for many paragraphs if desired.
-  \halign\bgroup&\global\advance\colcount by 1\relax
-    \multistrut\vtop{\hsize=\expandafter\csname col\the\colcount\endcsname
-  %
-  % In order to keep entries from bumping into each other
-  % we will add a \leftskip of \multitablecolspace to all columns after
-  % the first one.
-  % 
-  % If a template has been used, we will add \multitablecolspace
-  % to the width of each template entry.
-  % 
-  % If the user has set preamble in terms of percent of \hsize we will
-  % use that dimension as the width of the column, and the \leftskip
-  % will keep entries from bumping into each other.  Table will start at
-  % left margin and final column will justify at right margin.
-  % 
-  % Make sure we don't inherit \rightskip from the outer environment.
-  \rightskip=0pt
-  \ifnum\colcount=1
-    % The first column will be indented with the surrounding text.
-    \advance\hsize by\leftskip
-  \else
-    \ifsetpercent \else
-      % If user has not set preamble in terms of percent of \hsize
-      % we will advance \hsize by \multitablecolspace.
-      \advance\hsize by \multitablecolspace
-    \fi
-   % In either case we will make \leftskip=\multitablecolspace:
-  \leftskip=\multitablecolspace
-  \fi
-  % Ignoring space at the beginning and end avoids an occasional spurious
-  % blank line, when TeX decides to break the line at the space before the
-  % box from the multistrut, so the strut ends up on a line by itself.
-  % For example:
-  % @multitable @columnfractions .11 .89
-  % @item @code{#}
-  % @tab Legal holiday which is valid in major parts of the whole country.
-  % Is automatically provided with highlighting sequences respectively marking
-  % characters.
-  \noindent\ignorespaces##\unskip\multistrut}\cr
-}
-
-\def\setmultitablespacing{% test to see if user has set \multitablelinespace.
-% If so, do nothing. If not, give it an appropriate dimension based on
-% current baselineskip.
-\ifdim\multitablelinespace=0pt
-%% strut to put in table in case some entry doesn't have descenders,
-%% to keep lines equally spaced
-\let\multistrut = \strut
-%% Test to see if parskip is larger than space between lines of
-%% table. If not, do nothing.
-%%        If so, set to same dimension as multitablelinespace.
-\else
-\gdef\multistrut{\vrule height\multitablelinespace depth\dp0
-width0pt\relax} \fi
-\ifdim\multitableparskip>\multitablelinespace
-\global\multitableparskip=\multitablelinespace
-\global\advance\multitableparskip-7pt %% to keep parskip somewhat smaller
-                                      %% than skip between lines in the table.
-\fi%
-\ifdim\multitableparskip=0pt
-\global\multitableparskip=\multitablelinespace
-\global\advance\multitableparskip-7pt %% to keep parskip somewhat smaller
-                                      %% than skip between lines in the table.
-\fi}
-
-
-\message{indexing,}
-% Index generation facilities
-
-% Define \newwrite to be identical to plain tex's \newwrite
-% except not \outer, so it can be used within \newindex.
-{\catcode`\@=11
-\gdef\newwrite{\alloc@7\write\chardef\sixt@@n}}
-
-% \newindex {foo} defines an index named foo.
-% It automatically defines \fooindex such that
-% \fooindex ...rest of line... puts an entry in the index foo.
-% It also defines \fooindfile to be the number of the output channel for
-% the file that accumulates this index.  The file's extension is foo.
-% The name of an index should be no more than 2 characters long
-% for the sake of vms.
-%
-\def\newindex#1{%
-  \iflinks
-    \expandafter\newwrite \csname#1indfile\endcsname
-    \openout \csname#1indfile\endcsname \jobname.#1 % Open the file
-  \fi
-  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{%     % Define @#1index
-    \noexpand\doindex{#1}}
-}
-
-% @defindex foo  ==  \newindex{foo}
-
-\def\defindex{\parsearg\newindex}
-
-% Define @defcodeindex, like @defindex except put all entries in @code.
-
-\def\newcodeindex#1{%
-  \iflinks
-    \expandafter\newwrite \csname#1indfile\endcsname
-    \openout \csname#1indfile\endcsname \jobname.#1
-  \fi
-  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{%
-    \noexpand\docodeindex{#1}}
-}
-
-\def\defcodeindex{\parsearg\newcodeindex}
-
-% @synindex foo bar    makes index foo feed into index bar.
-% Do this instead of @defindex foo if you don't want it as a separate index.
-% The \closeout helps reduce unnecessary open files; the limit on the
-% Acorn RISC OS is a mere 16 files.
-\def\synindex#1 #2 {%
-  \expandafter\let\expandafter\synindexfoo\expandafter=\csname#2indfile\endcsname
-  \expandafter\closeout\csname#1indfile\endcsname
-  \expandafter\let\csname#1indfile\endcsname=\synindexfoo
-  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{% define \xxxindex
-    \noexpand\doindex{#2}}%
-}
-
-% @syncodeindex foo bar   similar, but put all entries made for index foo
-% inside @code.
-\def\syncodeindex#1 #2 {%
-  \expandafter\let\expandafter\synindexfoo\expandafter=\csname#2indfile\endcsname
-  \expandafter\closeout\csname#1indfile\endcsname
-  \expandafter\let\csname#1indfile\endcsname=\synindexfoo
-  \expandafter\xdef\csname#1index\endcsname{% define \xxxindex
-    \noexpand\docodeindex{#2}}%
-}
-
-% Define \doindex, the driver for all \fooindex macros.
-% Argument #1 is generated by the calling \fooindex macro,
-%  and it is "foo", the name of the index.
-
-% \doindex just uses \parsearg; it calls \doind for the actual work.
-% This is because \doind is more useful to call from other macros.
-
-% There is also \dosubind {index}{topic}{subtopic}
-% which makes an entry in a two-level index such as the operation index.
-
-\def\doindex#1{\edef\indexname{#1}\parsearg\singleindexer}
-\def\singleindexer #1{\doind{\indexname}{#1}}
-
-% like the previous two, but they put @code around the argument.
-\def\docodeindex#1{\edef\indexname{#1}\parsearg\singlecodeindexer}
-\def\singlecodeindexer #1{\doind{\indexname}{\code{#1}}}
-
-\def\indexdummies{%
-\def\ { }%
-% Take care of the plain tex accent commands.
-\def\"{\realbackslash "}%
-\def\`{\realbackslash `}%
-\def\'{\realbackslash '}%
-\def\^{\realbackslash ^}%
-\def\~{\realbackslash ~}%
-\def\={\realbackslash =}%
-\def\b{\realbackslash b}%
-\def\c{\realbackslash c}%
-\def\d{\realbackslash d}%
-\def\u{\realbackslash u}%
-\def\v{\realbackslash v}%
-\def\H{\realbackslash H}%
-% Take care of the plain tex special European modified letters.
-\def\oe{\realbackslash oe}%
-\def\ae{\realbackslash ae}%
-\def\aa{\realbackslash aa}%
-\def\OE{\realbackslash OE}%
-\def\AE{\realbackslash AE}%
-\def\AA{\realbackslash AA}%
-\def\o{\realbackslash o}%
-\def\O{\realbackslash O}%
-\def\l{\realbackslash l}%
-\def\L{\realbackslash L}%
-\def\ss{\realbackslash ss}%
-% Take care of texinfo commands likely to appear in an index entry.
-% (Must be a way to avoid doing expansion at all, and thus not have to
-% laboriously list every single command here.)
-\def\@{@}% will be @@ when we switch to @ as escape char.
-% Need these in case \tex is in effect and \{ is a \delimiter again.
-% But can't use \lbracecmd and \rbracecmd because texindex assumes
-% braces and backslashes are used only as delimiters.
-\let\{ = \mylbrace
-\let\} = \myrbrace
-\def\_{{\realbackslash _}}%
-\def\w{\realbackslash w }%
-\def\bf{\realbackslash bf }%
-%\def\rm{\realbackslash rm }%
-\def\sl{\realbackslash sl }%
-\def\sf{\realbackslash sf}%
-\def\tt{\realbackslash tt}%
-\def\gtr{\realbackslash gtr}%
-\def\less{\realbackslash less}%
-\def\hat{\realbackslash hat}%
-\def\TeX{\realbackslash TeX}%
-\def\dots{\realbackslash dots }%
-\def\result{\realbackslash result}%
-\def\equiv{\realbackslash equiv}%
-\def\expansion{\realbackslash expansion}%
-\def\print{\realbackslash print}%
-\def\error{\realbackslash error}%
-\def\point{\realbackslash point}%
-\def\copyright{\realbackslash copyright}%
-\def\tclose##1{\realbackslash tclose {##1}}%
-\def\code##1{\realbackslash code {##1}}%
-\def\uref##1{\realbackslash uref {##1}}%
-\def\url##1{\realbackslash url {##1}}%
-\def\env##1{\realbackslash env {##1}}%
-\def\command##1{\realbackslash command {##1}}%
-\def\option##1{\realbackslash option {##1}}%
-\def\dotless##1{\realbackslash dotless {##1}}%
-\def\samp##1{\realbackslash samp {##1}}%
-\def\,##1{\realbackslash ,{##1}}%
-\def\t##1{\realbackslash t {##1}}%
-\def\r##1{\realbackslash r {##1}}%
-\def\i##1{\realbackslash i {##1}}%
-\def\b##1{\realbackslash b {##1}}%
-\def\sc##1{\realbackslash sc {##1}}%
-\def\cite##1{\realbackslash cite {##1}}%
-\def\key##1{\realbackslash key {##1}}%
-\def\file##1{\realbackslash file {##1}}%
-\def\var##1{\realbackslash var {##1}}%
-\def\kbd##1{\realbackslash kbd {##1}}%
-\def\dfn##1{\realbackslash dfn {##1}}%
-\def\emph##1{\realbackslash emph {##1}}%
-\def\acronym##1{\realbackslash acronym {##1}}%
-%
-% Handle some cases of @value -- where the variable name does not
-% contain - or _, and the value does not contain any
-% (non-fully-expandable) commands.
-\let\value = \expandablevalue
-%
-\unsepspaces
-}
-
-% If an index command is used in an @example environment, any spaces
-% therein should become regular spaces in the raw index file, not the
-% expansion of \tie (\\leavevmode \penalty \@M \ ).
-{\obeyspaces
- \gdef\unsepspaces{\obeyspaces\let =\space}}
-
-% \indexnofonts no-ops all font-change commands.
-% This is used when outputting the strings to sort the index by.
-\def\indexdummyfont#1{#1}
-\def\indexdummytex{TeX}
-\def\indexdummydots{...}
-
-\def\indexnofonts{%
-% Just ignore accents.
-\let\,=\indexdummyfont
-\let\"=\indexdummyfont
-\let\`=\indexdummyfont
-\let\'=\indexdummyfont
-\let\^=\indexdummyfont
-\let\~=\indexdummyfont
-\let\==\indexdummyfont
-\let\b=\indexdummyfont
-\let\c=\indexdummyfont
-\let\d=\indexdummyfont
-\let\u=\indexdummyfont
-\let\v=\indexdummyfont
-\let\H=\indexdummyfont
-\let\dotless=\indexdummyfont
-% Take care of the plain tex special European modified letters.
-\def\oe{oe}%
-\def\ae{ae}%
-\def\aa{aa}%
-\def\OE{OE}%
-\def\AE{AE}%
-\def\AA{AA}%
-\def\o{o}%
-\def\O{O}%
-\def\l{l}%
-\def\L{L}%
-\def\ss{ss}%
-\let\w=\indexdummyfont
-\let\t=\indexdummyfont
-\let\r=\indexdummyfont
-\let\i=\indexdummyfont
-\let\b=\indexdummyfont
-\let\emph=\indexdummyfont
-\let\strong=\indexdummyfont
-\let\cite=\indexdummyfont
-\let\sc=\indexdummyfont
-%Don't no-op \tt, since it isn't a user-level command
-% and is used in the definitions of the active chars like <, >, |...
-%\let\tt=\indexdummyfont
-\let\tclose=\indexdummyfont
-\let\code=\indexdummyfont
-\let\url=\indexdummyfont
-\let\uref=\indexdummyfont
-\let\env=\indexdummyfont
-\let\command=\indexdummyfont
-\let\option=\indexdummyfont
-\let\file=\indexdummyfont
-\let\samp=\indexdummyfont
-\let\kbd=\indexdummyfont
-\let\key=\indexdummyfont
-\let\var=\indexdummyfont
-\let\TeX=\indexdummytex
-\let\dots=\indexdummydots
-\def\@{@}%
-}
-
-% To define \realbackslash, we must make \ not be an escape.
-% We must first make another character (@) an escape
-% so we do not become unable to do a definition.
-
-{\catcode`\@=0 \catcode`\\=\other
- @gdef@realbackslash{\}}
-
-\let\indexbackslash=0  %overridden during \printindex.
-\let\SETmarginindex=\relax % put index entries in margin (undocumented)?
-
-% For \ifx comparisons.
-\def\emptymacro{\empty}
-
-% Most index entries go through here, but \dosubind is the general case.
-% 
-\def\doind#1#2{\dosubind{#1}{#2}\empty}
-
-% Workhorse for all \fooindexes.
-% #1 is name of index, #2 is stuff to put there, #3 is subentry --
-% \empty if called from \doind, as we usually are.  The main exception
-% is with defuns, which call us directly.
-% 
-\def\dosubind#1#2#3{%
-  % Put the index entry in the margin if desired.
-  \ifx\SETmarginindex\relax\else
-    \insert\margin{\hbox{\vrule height8pt depth3pt width0pt #2}}%
-  \fi
-  {%
-    \count255=\lastpenalty
-    {%
-      \indexdummies % Must do this here, since \bf, etc expand at this stage
-      \escapechar=`\\
-      {%
-        \let\folio = 0% We will expand all macros now EXCEPT \folio.
-        \def\rawbackslashxx{\indexbackslash}% \indexbackslash isn't defined now
-        % so it will be output as is; and it will print as backslash.
-        %
-        \def\thirdarg{#3}%
-        %
-        % If third arg is present, precede it with space in sort key.
-        \ifx\thirdarg\emptymacro
-          \let\subentry = \empty
-        \else
-          \def\subentry{ #3}%
-        \fi
-        %
-        % First process the index-string with all font commands turned off
-        % to get the string to sort by.
-        {\indexnofonts \xdef\indexsorttmp{#2\subentry}}%
-        %
-        % Now produce the complete index entry, with both the sort key and the
-        % original text, including any font commands.
-        \toks0 = {#2}%
-        \edef\temp{%
-          \write\csname#1indfile\endcsname{%
-            \realbackslash entry{\indexsorttmp}{\folio}{\the\toks0}}%
-        }%
-        %
-        % If third (subentry) arg is present, add it to the index string.
-        \ifx\thirdarg\emptymacro \else
-          \toks0 = {#3}%
-          \edef\temp{\temp{\the\toks0}}%
-        \fi
-        %
-        % If a skip is the last thing on the list now, preserve it
-        % by backing up by \lastskip, doing the \write, then inserting
-        % the skip again.  Otherwise, the whatsit generated by the
-        % \write will make \lastskip zero.  The result is that sequences
-        % like this:
-        % @end defun
-        % @tindex whatever
-        % @defun ...
-        % will have extra space inserted, because the \medbreak in the
-        % start of the @defun won't see the skip inserted by the @end of
-        % the previous defun.
-        % 
-        % But don't do any of this if we're not in vertical mode.  We
-        % don't want to do a \vskip and prematurely end a paragraph.
-        % 
-        % Avoid page breaks due to these extra skips, too.
-        % 
-        \iflinks
-          \ifvmode
-            \skip0 = \lastskip
-            \ifdim\lastskip = 0pt \else \nobreak\vskip-\lastskip \fi
-          \fi
-          %
-          \temp % do the write
-          %
-          % 
-          \ifvmode \ifdim\skip0 = 0pt \else \nobreak\vskip\skip0 \fi \fi
-        \fi
-      }%
-    }%
-    \penalty\count255
-  }%
-}
-
-% The index entry written in the file actually looks like
-%  \entry {sortstring}{page}{topic}
-% or
-%  \entry {sortstring}{page}{topic}{subtopic}
-% The texindex program reads in these files and writes files
-% containing these kinds of lines:
-%  \initial {c}
-%     before the first topic whose initial is c
-%  \entry {topic}{pagelist}
-%     for a topic that is used without subtopics
-%  \primary {topic}
-%     for the beginning of a topic that is used with subtopics
-%  \secondary {subtopic}{pagelist}
-%     for each subtopic.
-
-% Define the user-accessible indexing commands
-% @findex, @vindex, @kindex, @cindex.
-
-\def\findex {\fnindex}
-\def\kindex {\kyindex}
-\def\cindex {\cpindex}
-\def\vindex {\vrindex}
-\def\tindex {\tpindex}
-\def\pindex {\pgindex}
-
-\def\cindexsub {\begingroup\obeylines\cindexsub}
-{\obeylines %
-\gdef\cindexsub "#1" #2^^M{\endgroup %
-\dosubind{cp}{#2}{#1}}}
-
-% Define the macros used in formatting output of the sorted index material.
-
-% @printindex causes a particular index (the ??s file) to get printed.
-% It does not print any chapter heading (usually an @unnumbered).
-%
-\def\printindex{\parsearg\doprintindex}
-\def\doprintindex#1{\begingroup
-  \dobreak \chapheadingskip{10000}%
-  %
-  \indexfonts \rm
-  \tolerance = 9500
-  \indexbreaks
-  %
-  % See if the index file exists and is nonempty.
-  % Change catcode of @ here so that if the index file contains
-  % \initial {@}
-  % as its first line, TeX doesn't complain about mismatched braces
-  % (because it thinks @} is a control sequence).
-  \catcode`\@ = 11
-  \openin 1 \jobname.#1s
-  \ifeof 1
-    % \enddoublecolumns gets confused if there is no text in the index,
-    % and it loses the chapter title and the aux file entries for the
-    % index.  The easiest way to prevent this problem is to make sure
-    % there is some text.
-    (Index is nonexistent)
-  \else
-    %
-    % If the index file exists but is empty, then \openin leaves \ifeof
-    % false.  We have to make TeX try to read something from the file, so
-    % it can discover if there is anything in it.
-    \read 1 to \temp
-    \ifeof 1
-      (Index is empty)
-    \else
-      % Index files are almost Texinfo source, but we use \ as the escape
-      % character.  It would be better to use @, but that's too big a change
-      % to make right now.
-      \def\indexbackslash{\rawbackslashxx}%
-      \catcode`\\ = 0
-      \escapechar = `\\
-      \begindoublecolumns
-      \input \jobname.#1s
-      \enddoublecolumns
-    \fi
-  \fi
-  \closein 1
-\endgroup}
-
-% These macros are used by the sorted index file itself.
-% Change them to control the appearance of the index.
-
-\def\initial#1{{%
-  % Some minor font changes for the special characters.
-  \let\tentt=\sectt \let\tt=\sectt \let\sf=\sectt
-  %
-  % Remove any glue we may have, we'll be inserting our own.
-  \removelastskip
-  % 
-  % We like breaks before the index initials, so insert a bonus.
-  \penalty -300
-  %
-  % Typeset the initial.  Making this add up to a whole number of
-  % baselineskips increases the chance of the dots lining up from column
-  % to column.  It still won't often be perfect, because of the stretch
-  % we need before each entry, but it's better.
-  % 
-  % No shrink because it confuses \balancecolumns.
-  \vskip 1.67\baselineskip plus .5\baselineskip
-  \leftline{\secbf #1}%
-  \vskip .33\baselineskip plus .1\baselineskip
-  %
-  % Do our best not to break after the initial.
-  \nobreak
-}}
-
-% This typesets a paragraph consisting of #1, dot leaders, and then #2
-% flush to the right margin.  It is used for index and table of contents
-% entries.  The paragraph is indented by \leftskip.
-%
-\def\entry#1#2{\begingroup
-  %
-  % Start a new paragraph if necessary, so our assignments below can't
-  % affect previous text.
-  \par
-  %
-  % Do not fill out the last line with white space.
-  \parfillskip = 0in
-  %
-  % No extra space above this paragraph.
-  \parskip = 0in
-  %
-  % Do not prefer a separate line ending with a hyphen to fewer lines.
-  \finalhyphendemerits = 0
-  %
-  % \hangindent is only relevant when the entry text and page number
-  % don't both fit on one line.  In that case, bob suggests starting the
-  % dots pretty far over on the line.  Unfortunately, a large
-  % indentation looks wrong when the entry text itself is broken across
-  % lines.  So we use a small indentation and put up with long leaders.
-  %
-  % \hangafter is reset to 1 (which is the value we want) at the start
-  % of each paragraph, so we need not do anything with that.
-  \hangindent = 2em
-  %
-  % When the entry text needs to be broken, just fill out the first line
-  % with blank space.
-  \rightskip = 0pt plus1fil
-  %
-  % A bit of stretch before each entry for the benefit of balancing columns.
-  \vskip 0pt plus1pt
-  %
-  % Start a ``paragraph'' for the index entry so the line breaking
-  % parameters we've set above will have an effect.
-  \noindent
-  %
-  % Insert the text of the index entry.  TeX will do line-breaking on it.
-  #1%
-  % The following is kludged to not output a line of dots in the index if
-  % there are no page numbers.  The next person who breaks this will be
-  % cursed by a Unix daemon.
-  \def\tempa{{\rm }}%
-  \def\tempb{#2}%
-  \edef\tempc{\tempa}%
-  \edef\tempd{\tempb}%
-  \ifx\tempc\tempd\ \else%
-    %
-    % If we must, put the page number on a line of its own, and fill out
-    % this line with blank space.  (The \hfil is overwhelmed with the
-    % fill leaders glue in \indexdotfill if the page number does fit.)
-    \hfil\penalty50
-    \null\nobreak\indexdotfill % Have leaders before the page number.
-    %
-    % The `\ ' here is removed by the implicit \unskip that TeX does as
-    % part of (the primitive) \par.  Without it, a spurious underfull
-    % \hbox ensues.
-    \ #2% The page number ends the paragraph.
-  \fi%
-  \par
-\endgroup}
-
-% Like \dotfill except takes at least 1 em.
-\def\indexdotfill{\cleaders
-  \hbox{$\mathsurround=0pt \mkern1.5mu ${\it .}$ \mkern1.5mu$}\hskip 1em plus 1fill}
-
-\def\primary #1{\line{#1\hfil}}
-
-\newskip\secondaryindent \secondaryindent=0.5cm
-
-\def\secondary #1#2{
-{\parfillskip=0in \parskip=0in
-\hangindent =1in \hangafter=1
-\noindent\hskip\secondaryindent\hbox{#1}\indexdotfill #2\par
-}}
-
-% Define two-column mode, which we use to typeset indexes.
-% Adapted from the TeXbook, page 416, which is to say,
-% the manmac.tex format used to print the TeXbook itself.
-\catcode`\@=11
-
-\newbox\partialpage
-\newdimen\doublecolumnhsize
-
-\def\begindoublecolumns{\begingroup % ended by \enddoublecolumns
-  % Grab any single-column material above us.
-  \output = {\global\setbox\partialpage = \vbox{%
-    % 
-    % Here is a possibility not foreseen in manmac: if we accumulate a
-    % whole lot of material, we might end up calling this \output
-    % routine twice in a row (see the doublecol-lose test, which is
-    % essentially a couple of indexes with @setchapternewpage off).  In
-    % that case, we must prevent the second \partialpage from
-    % simply overwriting the first, causing us to lose the page.
-    % This will preserve it until a real output routine can ship it
-    % out.  Generally, \partialpage will be empty when this runs and
-    % this will be a no-op.
-    \unvbox\partialpage
-    %
-    % Unvbox the main output page.
-    \unvbox255
-    \kern-\topskip \kern\baselineskip
-  }}%
-  \eject % run that output routine to set \partialpage
-  %
-  % Use the double-column output routine for subsequent pages.
-  \output = {\doublecolumnout}%
-  %
-  % Change the page size parameters.  We could do this once outside this
-  % routine, in each of @smallbook, @afourpaper, and the default 8.5x11
-  % format, but then we repeat the same computation.  Repeating a couple
-  % of assignments once per index is clearly meaningless for the
-  % execution time, so we may as well do it in one place.
-  %
-  % First we halve the line length, less a little for the gutter between
-  % the columns.  We compute the gutter based on the line length, so it
-  % changes automatically with the paper format.  The magic constant
-  % below is chosen so that the gutter has the same value (well, +-<1pt)
-  % as it did when we hard-coded it.
-  %
-  % We put the result in a separate register, \doublecolumhsize, so we
-  % can restore it in \pagesofar, after \hsize itself has (potentially)
-  % been clobbered.
-  %
-  \doublecolumnhsize = \hsize
-    \advance\doublecolumnhsize by -.04154\hsize
-    \divide\doublecolumnhsize by 2
-  \hsize = \doublecolumnhsize
-  %
-  % Double the \vsize as well.  (We don't need a separate register here,
-  % since nobody clobbers \vsize.)
-  \advance\vsize by -\ht\partialpage
-  \vsize = 2\vsize
-}
-
-% The double-column output routine for all double-column pages except
-% the last.
-% 
-\def\doublecolumnout{%
-  \splittopskip=\topskip \splitmaxdepth=\maxdepth
-  % Get the available space for the double columns -- the normal
-  % (undoubled) page height minus any material left over from the
-  % previous page.
-  \dimen@ = \vsize
-  \divide\dimen@ by 2
-  %
-  % box0 will be the left-hand column, box2 the right.
-  \setbox0=\vsplit255 to\dimen@ \setbox2=\vsplit255 to\dimen@
-  \onepageout\pagesofar
-  \unvbox255
-  \penalty\outputpenalty
-}
-\def\pagesofar{%
-  % Re-output the contents of the output page -- any previous material,
-  % followed by the two boxes we just split, in box0 and box2.
-  \advance\vsize by \ht\partialpage
-  \unvbox\partialpage
-  %
-  \hsize = \doublecolumnhsize
-  \wd0=\hsize \wd2=\hsize
-  \hbox to\pagewidth{\box0\hfil\box2}%
-}
-\def\enddoublecolumns{%
-  \output = {%
-    % Split the last of the double-column material.  Leave it on the
-    % current page, no automatic page break.
-    \balancecolumns
-    %
-    % If we end up splitting too much material for the current page,
-    % though, there will be another page break right after this \output
-    % invocation ends.  Having called \balancecolumns once, we do not
-    % want to call it again.  Therefore, reset \output to its normal
-    % definition right away.  (We hope \balancecolumns will never be
-    % called on to balance too much material, but if it is, this makes
-    % the output somewhat more palatable.)
-    \global\output = {\onepageout{\pagecontents\PAGE}}%
-  }%
-  \eject
-  \endgroup % started in \begindoublecolumns
-  %
-  % \pagegoal was set to the doubled \vsize above, since we restarted
-  % the current page.  We're now back to normal single-column
-  % typesetting, so reset \pagegoal to the normal \vsize (after the
-  % \endgroup where \vsize got restored).
-  \pagegoal = \vsize
-}
-\def\balancecolumns{%
-  % Called at the end of the double column material.
-  \setbox0 = \vbox{\unvbox255}% like \box255 but more efficient, see p.120.
-  \dimen@ = \ht0
-  \advance\dimen@ by \topskip
-  \advance\dimen@ by-\baselineskip
-  \divide\dimen@ by 2 % target to split to
-  %debug\message{final 2-column material height=\the\ht0, target=\the\dimen@.}%
-  \splittopskip = \topskip
-  % Loop until we get a decent breakpoint.
-  {%
-    \vbadness = 10000
-    \loop
-      \global\setbox3 = \copy0
-      \global\setbox1 = \vsplit3 to \dimen@
-    \ifdim\ht3>\dimen@
-      \global\advance\dimen@ by 1pt
-    \repeat
-  }%
-  %debug\message{split to \the\dimen@, column heights: \the\ht1, \the\ht3.}%
-  \setbox0=\vbox to\dimen@{\unvbox1}%
-  \setbox2=\vbox to\dimen@{\unvbox3}%
-  %
-  \pagesofar
-}
-\catcode`\@ = \other
-
-
-\message{sectioning,}
-% Define chapters, sections, etc.
-
-\newcount\chapno
-\newcount\secno        \secno=0
-\newcount\subsecno     \subsecno=0
-\newcount\subsubsecno  \subsubsecno=0
-
-% This counter is funny since it counts through charcodes of letters A, B, ...
-\newcount\appendixno  \appendixno = `\@
-\def\appendixletter{\char\the\appendixno}
-
-% Each @chapter defines this as the name of the chapter.
-% page headings and footings can use it.  @section does likewise.
-\def\thischapter{}
-\def\thissection{}
-
-\newcount\absseclevel % used to calculate proper heading level
-\newcount\secbase\secbase=0 % @raise/lowersections modify this count
-
-% @raisesections: treat @section as chapter, @subsection as section, etc.
-\def\raisesections{\global\advance\secbase by -1}
-\let\up=\raisesections % original BFox name
-
-% @lowersections: treat @chapter as section, @section as subsection, etc.
-\def\lowersections{\global\advance\secbase by 1}
-\let\down=\lowersections % original BFox name
-
-% Choose a numbered-heading macro
-% #1 is heading level if unmodified by @raisesections or @lowersections
-% #2 is text for heading
-\def\numhead#1#2{\absseclevel=\secbase\advance\absseclevel by #1
-\ifcase\absseclevel
-  \chapterzzz{#2}
-\or
-  \seczzz{#2}
-\or
-  \numberedsubseczzz{#2}
-\or
-  \numberedsubsubseczzz{#2}
-\else
-  \ifnum \absseclevel<0
-    \chapterzzz{#2}
-  \else
-    \numberedsubsubseczzz{#2}
-  \fi
-\fi
-}
-
-% like \numhead, but chooses appendix heading levels
-\def\apphead#1#2{\absseclevel=\secbase\advance\absseclevel by #1
-\ifcase\absseclevel
-  \appendixzzz{#2}
-\or
-  \appendixsectionzzz{#2}
-\or
-  \appendixsubseczzz{#2}
-\or
-  \appendixsubsubseczzz{#2}
-\else
-  \ifnum \absseclevel<0
-    \appendixzzz{#2}
-  \else
-    \appendixsubsubseczzz{#2}
-  \fi
-\fi
-}
-
-% like \numhead, but chooses numberless heading levels
-\def\unnmhead#1#2{\absseclevel=\secbase\advance\absseclevel by #1
-\ifcase\absseclevel
-  \unnumberedzzz{#2}
-\or
-  \unnumberedseczzz{#2}
-\or
-  \unnumberedsubseczzz{#2}
-\or
-  \unnumberedsubsubseczzz{#2}
-\else
-  \ifnum \absseclevel<0
-    \unnumberedzzz{#2}
-  \else
-    \unnumberedsubsubseczzz{#2}
-  \fi
-\fi
-}
-
-% @chapter, @appendix, @unnumbered.
-\def\thischaptername{No Chapter Title}
-\outer\def\chapter{\parsearg\chapteryyy}
-\def\chapteryyy #1{\numhead0{#1}} % normally numhead0 calls chapterzzz
-\def\chapterzzz #1{%
-\secno=0 \subsecno=0 \subsubsecno=0
-\global\advance \chapno by 1 \message{\putwordChapter\space \the\chapno}%
-\chapmacro {#1}{\the\chapno}%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\gdef\thischaptername{#1}%
-% We don't substitute the actual chapter name into \thischapter
-% because we don't want its macros evaluated now.
-\xdef\thischapter{\putwordChapter{} \the\chapno: \noexpand\thischaptername}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash chapentry{\the\toks0}%
-                                  {\the\chapno}}}%
-\temp
-\donoderef
-\global\let\section = \numberedsec
-\global\let\subsection = \numberedsubsec
-\global\let\subsubsection = \numberedsubsubsec
-}
-
-\outer\def\appendix{\parsearg\appendixyyy}
-\def\appendixyyy #1{\apphead0{#1}} % normally apphead0 calls appendixzzz
-\def\appendixzzz #1{%
-\secno=0 \subsecno=0 \subsubsecno=0
-\global\advance \appendixno by 1
-\message{\putwordAppendix\space \appendixletter}%
-\chapmacro {#1}{\putwordAppendix{} \appendixletter}%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\gdef\thischaptername{#1}%
-\xdef\thischapter{\putwordAppendix{} \appendixletter: \noexpand\thischaptername}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash chapentry{\the\toks0}%
-                       {\putwordAppendix{} \appendixletter}}}%
-\temp
-\appendixnoderef
-\global\let\section = \appendixsec
-\global\let\subsection = \appendixsubsec
-\global\let\subsubsection = \appendixsubsubsec
-}
-
-% @centerchap is like @unnumbered, but the heading is centered.
-\outer\def\centerchap{\parsearg\centerchapyyy}
-\def\centerchapyyy #1{{\let\unnumbchapmacro=\centerchapmacro \unnumberedyyy{#1}}}
-
-% @top is like @unnumbered.
-\outer\def\top{\parsearg\unnumberedyyy}
-
-\outer\def\unnumbered{\parsearg\unnumberedyyy}
-\def\unnumberedyyy #1{\unnmhead0{#1}} % normally unnmhead0 calls unnumberedzzz
-\def\unnumberedzzz #1{%
-\secno=0 \subsecno=0 \subsubsecno=0
-%
-% This used to be simply \message{#1}, but TeX fully expands the
-% argument to \message.  Therefore, if #1 contained @-commands, TeX
-% expanded them.  For example, in `@unnumbered The @cite{Book}', TeX
-% expanded @cite (which turns out to cause errors because \cite is meant
-% to be executed, not expanded).
-%
-% Anyway, we don't want the fully-expanded definition of @cite to appear
-% as a result of the \message, we just want `@cite' itself.  We use
-% \the<toks register> to achieve this: TeX expands \the<toks> only once,
-% simply yielding the contents of <toks register>.  (We also do this for
-% the toc entries.)
-\toks0 = {#1}\message{(\the\toks0)}%
-%
-\unnumbchapmacro {#1}%
-\gdef\thischapter{#1}\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash unnumbchapentry{\the\toks0}}}%
-\temp
-\unnumbnoderef
-\global\let\section = \unnumberedsec
-\global\let\subsection = \unnumberedsubsec
-\global\let\subsubsection = \unnumberedsubsubsec
-}
-
-% Sections.
-\outer\def\numberedsec{\parsearg\secyyy}
-\def\secyyy #1{\numhead1{#1}} % normally calls seczzz
-\def\seczzz #1{%
-\subsecno=0 \subsubsecno=0 \global\advance \secno by 1 %
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\secheading {#1}{\the\chapno}{\the\secno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash secentry{\the\toks0}%
-                                  {\the\chapno}{\the\secno}}}%
-\temp
-\donoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\appendixsection{\parsearg\appendixsecyyy}
-\outer\def\appendixsec{\parsearg\appendixsecyyy}
-\def\appendixsecyyy #1{\apphead1{#1}} % normally calls appendixsectionzzz
-\def\appendixsectionzzz #1{%
-\subsecno=0 \subsubsecno=0 \global\advance \secno by 1 %
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\secheading {#1}{\appendixletter}{\the\secno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash secentry{\the\toks0}%
-                                  {\appendixletter}{\the\secno}}}%
-\temp
-\appendixnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\unnumberedsec{\parsearg\unnumberedsecyyy}
-\def\unnumberedsecyyy #1{\unnmhead1{#1}} % normally calls unnumberedseczzz
-\def\unnumberedseczzz #1{%
-\plainsecheading {#1}\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash unnumbsecentry{\the\toks0}}}%
-\temp
-\unnumbnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-% Subsections.
-\outer\def\numberedsubsec{\parsearg\numberedsubsecyyy}
-\def\numberedsubsecyyy #1{\numhead2{#1}} % normally calls numberedsubseczzz
-\def\numberedsubseczzz #1{%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\subsubsecno=0 \global\advance \subsecno by 1 %
-\subsecheading {#1}{\the\chapno}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash subsecentry{\the\toks0}%
-                                    {\the\chapno}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}}}%
-\temp
-\donoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\appendixsubsec{\parsearg\appendixsubsecyyy}
-\def\appendixsubsecyyy #1{\apphead2{#1}} % normally calls appendixsubseczzz
-\def\appendixsubseczzz #1{%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\subsubsecno=0 \global\advance \subsecno by 1 %
-\subsecheading {#1}{\appendixletter}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash subsecentry{\the\toks0}%
-                                {\appendixletter}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}}}%
-\temp
-\appendixnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\unnumberedsubsec{\parsearg\unnumberedsubsecyyy}
-\def\unnumberedsubsecyyy #1{\unnmhead2{#1}} %normally calls unnumberedsubseczzz
-\def\unnumberedsubseczzz #1{%
-\plainsubsecheading {#1}\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash unnumbsubsecentry%
-                                    {\the\toks0}}}%
-\temp
-\unnumbnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-% Subsubsections.
-\outer\def\numberedsubsubsec{\parsearg\numberedsubsubsecyyy}
-\def\numberedsubsubsecyyy #1{\numhead3{#1}} % normally numberedsubsubseczzz
-\def\numberedsubsubseczzz #1{%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\global\advance \subsubsecno by 1 %
-\subsubsecheading {#1}
-  {\the\chapno}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}{\the\subsubsecno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash subsubsecentry{\the\toks0}%
-  {\the\chapno}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}{\the\subsubsecno}}}%
-\temp
-\donoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\appendixsubsubsec{\parsearg\appendixsubsubsecyyy}
-\def\appendixsubsubsecyyy #1{\apphead3{#1}} % normally appendixsubsubseczzz
-\def\appendixsubsubseczzz #1{%
-\gdef\thissection{#1}\global\advance \subsubsecno by 1 %
-\subsubsecheading {#1}
-  {\appendixletter}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}{\the\subsubsecno}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash subsubsecentry{\the\toks0}%
-  {\appendixletter}{\the\secno}{\the\subsecno}{\the\subsubsecno}}}%
-\temp
-\appendixnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-\outer\def\unnumberedsubsubsec{\parsearg\unnumberedsubsubsecyyy}
-\def\unnumberedsubsubsecyyy #1{\unnmhead3{#1}} %normally unnumberedsubsubseczzz
-\def\unnumberedsubsubseczzz #1{%
-\plainsubsubsecheading {#1}\gdef\thissection{#1}%
-\toks0 = {#1}%
-\edef\temp{\noexpand\writetocentry{\realbackslash unnumbsubsubsecentry%
-                                    {\the\toks0}}}%
-\temp
-\unnumbnoderef
-\nobreak
-}
-
-% These are variants which are not "outer", so they can appear in @ifinfo.
-% Actually, they should now be obsolete; ordinary section commands should work.
-\def\infotop{\parsearg\unnumberedzzz}
-\def\infounnumbered{\parsearg\unnumberedzzz}
-\def\infounnumberedsec{\parsearg\unnumberedseczzz}
-\def\infounnumberedsubsec{\parsearg\unnumberedsubseczzz}
-\def\infounnumberedsubsubsec{\parsearg\unnumberedsubsubseczzz}
-
-\def\infoappendix{\parsearg\appendixzzz}
-\def\infoappendixsec{\parsearg\appendixseczzz}
-\def\infoappendixsubsec{\parsearg\appendixsubseczzz}
-\def\infoappendixsubsubsec{\parsearg\appendixsubsubseczzz}
-
-\def\infochapter{\parsearg\chapterzzz}
-\def\infosection{\parsearg\sectionzzz}
-\def\infosubsection{\parsearg\subsectionzzz}
-\def\infosubsubsection{\parsearg\subsubsectionzzz}
-
-% These macros control what the section commands do, according
-% to what kind of chapter we are in (ordinary, appendix, or unnumbered).
-% Define them by default for a numbered chapter.
-\global\let\section = \numberedsec
-\global\let\subsection = \numberedsubsec
-\global\let\subsubsection = \numberedsubsubsec
-
-% Define @majorheading, @heading and @subheading
-
-% NOTE on use of \vbox for chapter headings, section headings, and such:
-%       1) We use \vbox rather than the earlier \line to permit
-%          overlong headings to fold.
-%       2) \hyphenpenalty is set to 10000 because hyphenation in a
-%          heading is obnoxious; this forbids it.
-%       3) Likewise, headings look best if no \parindent is used, and
-%          if justification is not attempted.  Hence \raggedright.
-
-
-\def\majorheading{\parsearg\majorheadingzzz}
-\def\majorheadingzzz #1{%
-{\advance\chapheadingskip by 10pt \chapbreak }%
-{\chapfonts \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000\tolerance=5000
-                  \parindent=0pt\raggedright
-                  \rm #1\hfill}}\bigskip \par\penalty 200}
-
-\def\chapheading{\parsearg\chapheadingzzz}
-\def\chapheadingzzz #1{\chapbreak %
-{\chapfonts \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000\tolerance=5000
-                  \parindent=0pt\raggedright
-                  \rm #1\hfill}}\bigskip \par\penalty 200}
-
-% @heading, @subheading, @subsubheading.
-\def\heading{\parsearg\plainsecheading}
-\def\subheading{\parsearg\plainsubsecheading}
-\def\subsubheading{\parsearg\plainsubsubsecheading}
-
-% These macros generate a chapter, section, etc. heading only
-% (including whitespace, linebreaking, etc. around it),
-% given all the information in convenient, parsed form.
-
-%%% Args are the skip and penalty (usually negative)
-\def\dobreak#1#2{\par\ifdim\lastskip<#1\removelastskip\penalty#2\vskip#1\fi}
-
-\def\setchapterstyle #1 {\csname CHAPF#1\endcsname}
-
-%%% Define plain chapter starts, and page on/off switching for it
-% Parameter controlling skip before chapter headings (if needed)
-
-\newskip\chapheadingskip
-
-\def\chapbreak{\dobreak \chapheadingskip {-4000}}
-\def\chappager{\par\vfill\supereject}
-\def\chapoddpage{\chappager \ifodd\pageno \else \hbox to 0pt{} \chappager\fi}
-
-\def\setchapternewpage #1 {\csname CHAPPAG#1\endcsname}
-
-\def\CHAPPAGoff{%
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
-\global\let\pchapsepmacro=\chapbreak
-\global\let\pagealignmacro=\chappager}
-
-\def\CHAPPAGon{%
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chappager
-\global\let\pchapsepmacro=\chappager
-\global\let\pagealignmacro=\chappager
-\global\def\HEADINGSon{\HEADINGSsingle}}
-
-\def\CHAPPAGodd{
-\global\let\contentsalignmacro = \chapoddpage
-\global\let\pchapsepmacro=\chapoddpage
-\global\let\pagealignmacro=\chapoddpage
-\global\def\HEADINGSon{\HEADINGSdouble}}
-
-\CHAPPAGon
-
-\def\CHAPFplain{
-\global\let\chapmacro=\chfplain
-\global\let\unnumbchapmacro=\unnchfplain
-\global\let\centerchapmacro=\centerchfplain}
-
-% Plain chapter opening.
-% #1 is the text, #2 the chapter number or empty if unnumbered.
-\def\chfplain#1#2{%
-  \pchapsepmacro
-  {%
-    \chapfonts \rm
-    \def\chapnum{#2}%
-    \setbox0 = \hbox{#2\ifx\chapnum\empty\else\enspace\fi}%
-    \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000 \tolerance=5000 \parindent=0pt \raggedright
-          \hangindent = \wd0 \centerparametersmaybe
-          \unhbox0 #1\par}%
-  }%
-  \nobreak\bigskip % no page break after a chapter title
-  \nobreak
-}
-
-% Plain opening for unnumbered.
-\def\unnchfplain#1{\chfplain{#1}{}}
-
-% @centerchap -- centered and unnumbered.
-\let\centerparametersmaybe = \relax
-\def\centerchfplain#1{{%
-  \def\centerparametersmaybe{%
-    \advance\rightskip by 3\rightskip
-    \leftskip = \rightskip
-    \parfillskip = 0pt
-  }%
-  \chfplain{#1}{}%
-}}
-
-\CHAPFplain % The default
-
-\def\unnchfopen #1{%
-\chapoddpage {\chapfonts \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000\tolerance=5000
-                       \parindent=0pt\raggedright
-                       \rm #1\hfill}}\bigskip \par\nobreak
-}
-
-\def\chfopen #1#2{\chapoddpage {\chapfonts
-\vbox to 3in{\vfil \hbox to\hsize{\hfil #2} \hbox to\hsize{\hfil #1} \vfil}}%
-\par\penalty 5000 %
-}
-
-\def\centerchfopen #1{%
-\chapoddpage {\chapfonts \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000\tolerance=5000
-                       \parindent=0pt
-                       \hfill {\rm #1}\hfill}}\bigskip \par\nobreak
-}
-
-\def\CHAPFopen{
-\global\let\chapmacro=\chfopen
-\global\let\unnumbchapmacro=\unnchfopen
-\global\let\centerchapmacro=\centerchfopen}
-
-
-% Section titles.
-\newskip\secheadingskip
-\def\secheadingbreak{\dobreak \secheadingskip {-1000}}
-\def\secheading#1#2#3{\sectionheading{sec}{#2.#3}{#1}}
-\def\plainsecheading#1{\sectionheading{sec}{}{#1}}
-
-% Subsection titles.
-\newskip \subsecheadingskip
-\def\subsecheadingbreak{\dobreak \subsecheadingskip {-500}}
-\def\subsecheading#1#2#3#4{\sectionheading{subsec}{#2.#3.#4}{#1}}
-\def\plainsubsecheading#1{\sectionheading{subsec}{}{#1}}
-
-% Subsubsection titles.
-\let\subsubsecheadingskip = \subsecheadingskip
-\let\subsubsecheadingbreak = \subsecheadingbreak
-\def\subsubsecheading#1#2#3#4#5{\sectionheading{subsubsec}{#2.#3.#4.#5}{#1}}
-\def\plainsubsubsecheading#1{\sectionheading{subsubsec}{}{#1}}
-
-
-% Print any size section title.
-%
-% #1 is the section type (sec/subsec/subsubsec), #2 is the section
-% number (maybe empty), #3 the text.
-\def\sectionheading#1#2#3{%
-  {%
-    \expandafter\advance\csname #1headingskip\endcsname by \parskip
-    \csname #1headingbreak\endcsname
-  }%
-  {%
-    % Switch to the right set of fonts.
-    \csname #1fonts\endcsname \rm
-    %
-    % Only insert the separating space if we have a section number.
-    \def\secnum{#2}%
-    \setbox0 = \hbox{#2\ifx\secnum\empty\else\enspace\fi}%
-    %
-    \vbox{\hyphenpenalty=10000 \tolerance=5000 \parindent=0pt \raggedright
-          \hangindent = \wd0 % zero if no section number
-          \unhbox0 #3}%
-  }%
-  \ifdim\parskip<10pt \nobreak\kern10pt\nobreak\kern-\parskip\fi \nobreak
-}
-
-
-\message{toc,}
-\newwrite\tocfile
-
-% Write an entry to the toc file, opening it if necessary.
-% Called from @chapter, etc.  We supply {\folio} at the end of the
-% argument, which will end up as the last argument to the \...entry macro.
-% 
-% We open the .toc file here instead of at @setfilename or any other
-% given time so that @contents can be put in the document anywhere.
-% 
-\newif\iftocfileopened
-\def\writetocentry#1{%
-  \iftocfileopened\else
-    \immediate\openout\tocfile = \jobname.toc
-    \global\tocfileopenedtrue
-  \fi
-  \iflinks \write\tocfile{#1{\folio}}\fi
-}
-
-\newskip\contentsrightmargin \contentsrightmargin=1in
-\newcount\savepageno
-\newcount\lastnegativepageno \lastnegativepageno = -1
-
-% Finish up the main text and prepare to read what we've written
-% to \tocfile.
-% 
-\def\startcontents#1{%
-   % If @setchapternewpage on, and @headings double, the contents should
-   % start on an odd page, unlike chapters.  Thus, we maintain
-   % \contentsalignmacro in parallel with \pagealignmacro.
-   % From: Torbjorn Granlund <tege@matematik.su.se>
-   \contentsalignmacro
-   \immediate\closeout\tocfile
-   %
-   % Don't need to put `Contents' or `Short Contents' in the headline.
-   % It is abundantly clear what they are.
-   \unnumbchapmacro{#1}\def\thischapter{}%
-   \savepageno = \pageno
-   \begingroup                  % Set up to handle contents files properly.
-      \catcode`\\=0  \catcode`\{=1  \catcode`\}=2  \catcode`\@=11
-      % We can't do this, because then an actual ^ in a section
-      % title fails, e.g., @chapter ^ -- exponentiation.  --karl, 9jul97.
-      %\catcode`\^=7 % to see ^^e4 as \"a etc. juha@piuha.ydi.vtt.fi
-      \raggedbottom             % Worry more about breakpoints than the bottom.
-      \advance\hsize by -\contentsrightmargin % Don't use the full line length.
-      %
-      % Roman numerals for page numbers.
-      \ifnum \pageno>0 \pageno = \lastnegativepageno \fi
-}
-
-
-% Normal (long) toc.
-\def\contents{%
-   \startcontents{\putwordTableofContents}%
-     \openin 1 \jobname.toc
-     \ifeof 1 \else
-       \closein 1
-       \input \jobname.toc
-     \fi
-     \vfill \eject
-   \endgroup
-   \lastnegativepageno = \pageno
-   \pageno = \savepageno
-}
-
-% And just the chapters.
-\def\summarycontents{%
-   \startcontents{\putwordShortContents}%
-      %
-      \let\chapentry = \shortchapentry
-      \let\unnumbchapentry = \shortunnumberedentry
-      % We want a true roman here for the page numbers.
-      \secfonts
-      \let\rm=\shortcontrm \let\bf=\shortcontbf \let\sl=\shortcontsl
-      \rm
-      \hyphenpenalty = 10000
-      \advance\baselineskip by 1pt % Open it up a little.
-      \def\secentry ##1##2##3##4{}
-      \def\unnumbsecentry ##1##2{}
-      \def\subsecentry ##1##2##3##4##5{}
-      \def\unnumbsubsecentry ##1##2{}
-      \def\subsubsecentry ##1##2##3##4##5##6{}
-      \def\unnumbsubsubsecentry ##1##2{}
-      \openin 1 \jobname.toc
-      \ifeof 1 \else
-        \closein 1
-        \input \jobname.toc
-      \fi
-     \vfill \eject
-   \endgroup
-   \lastnegativepageno = \pageno
-   \pageno = \savepageno
-}
-\let\shortcontents = \summarycontents
-
-% These macros generate individual entries in the table of contents.
-% The first argument is the chapter or section name.
-% The last argument is the page number.
-% The arguments in between are the chapter number, section number, ...
-
-% Chapter-level things, for both the long and short contents.
-\def\chapentry#1#2#3{\dochapentry{#2\labelspace#1}{#3}}
-
-% See comments in \dochapentry re vbox and related settings
-\def\shortchapentry#1#2#3{%
-  \tocentry{\shortchaplabel{#2}\labelspace #1}{\doshortpageno{#3}}%
-}
-
-% Typeset the label for a chapter or appendix for the short contents.
-% The arg is, e.g. `Appendix A' for an appendix, or `3' for a chapter.
-% We could simplify the code here by writing out an \appendixentry
-% command in the toc file for appendices, instead of using \chapentry
-% for both, but it doesn't seem worth it.
-\setbox0 = \hbox{\shortcontrm \putwordAppendix }
-\newdimen\shortappendixwidth \shortappendixwidth = \wd0
-
-\def\shortchaplabel#1{%
-  % We typeset #1 in a box of constant width, regardless of the text of
-  % #1, so the chapter titles will come out aligned.
-  \setbox0 = \hbox{#1}%
-  \dimen0 = \ifdim\wd0 > \shortappendixwidth \shortappendixwidth \else 0pt \fi
-  %
-  % This space should be plenty, since a single number is .5em, and the
-  % widest letter (M) is 1em, at least in the Computer Modern fonts.
-  % (This space doesn't include the extra space that gets added after
-  % the label; that gets put in by \shortchapentry above.)
-  \advance\dimen0 by 1.1em
-  \hbox to \dimen0{#1\hfil}%
-}
-
-\def\unnumbchapentry#1#2{\dochapentry{#1}{#2}}
-\def\shortunnumberedentry#1#2{\tocentry{#1}{\doshortpageno{#2}}}
-
-% Sections.
-\def\secentry#1#2#3#4{\dosecentry{#2.#3\labelspace#1}{#4}}
-\def\unnumbsecentry#1#2{\dosecentry{#1}{#2}}
-
-% Subsections.
-\def\subsecentry#1#2#3#4#5{\dosubsecentry{#2.#3.#4\labelspace#1}{#5}}
-\def\unnumbsubsecentry#1#2{\dosubsecentry{#1}{#2}}
-
-% And subsubsections.
-\def\subsubsecentry#1#2#3#4#5#6{%
-  \dosubsubsecentry{#2.#3.#4.#5\labelspace#1}{#6}}
-\def\unnumbsubsubsecentry#1#2{\dosubsubsecentry{#1}{#2}}
-
-% This parameter controls the indentation of the various levels.
-\newdimen\tocindent \tocindent = 3pc
-
-% Now for the actual typesetting. In all these, #1 is the text and #2 is the
-% page number.
-%
-% If the toc has to be broken over pages, we want it to be at chapters
-% if at all possible; hence the \penalty.
-\def\dochapentry#1#2{%
-   \penalty-300 \vskip1\baselineskip plus.33\baselineskip minus.25\baselineskip
-   \begingroup
-     \chapentryfonts
-     \tocentry{#1}{\dopageno{#2}}%
-   \endgroup
-   \nobreak\vskip .25\baselineskip plus.1\baselineskip
-}
-
-\def\dosecentry#1#2{\begingroup
-  \secentryfonts \leftskip=\tocindent
-  \tocentry{#1}{\dopageno{#2}}%
-\endgroup}
-
-\def\dosubsecentry#1#2{\begingroup
-  \subsecentryfonts \leftskip=2\tocindent
-  \tocentry{#1}{\dopageno{#2}}%
-\endgroup}
-
-\def\dosubsubsecentry#1#2{\begingroup
-  \subsubsecentryfonts \leftskip=3\tocindent
-  \tocentry{#1}{\dopageno{#2}}%
-\endgroup}
-
-% Final typesetting of a toc entry; we use the same \entry macro as for
-% the index entries, but we want to suppress hyphenation here.  (We
-% can't do that in the \entry macro, since index entries might consist
-% of hyphenated-identifiers-that-do-not-fit-on-a-line-and-nothing-else.)
-\def\tocentry#1#2{\begingroup
-  \vskip 0pt plus1pt % allow a little stretch for the sake of nice page breaks
-  % Do not use \turnoffactive in these arguments.  Since the toc is
-  % typeset in cmr, so characters such as _ would come out wrong; we
-  % have to do the usual translation tricks.
-  \entry{#1}{#2}%
-\endgroup}
-
-% Space between chapter (or whatever) number and the title.
-\def\labelspace{\hskip1em \relax}
-
-\def\dopageno#1{{\rm #1}}
-\def\doshortpageno#1{{\rm #1}}
-
-\def\chapentryfonts{\secfonts \rm}
-\def\secentryfonts{\textfonts}
-\let\subsecentryfonts = \textfonts
-\let\subsubsecentryfonts = \textfonts
-
-
-\message{environments,}
-
-% Since these characters are used in examples, it should be an even number of
-% \tt widths. Each \tt character is 1en, so two makes it 1em.
-% Furthermore, these definitions must come after we define our fonts.
-\newbox\dblarrowbox    \newbox\longdblarrowbox
-\newbox\pushcharbox    \newbox\bullbox
-\newbox\equivbox       \newbox\errorbox
-
-%{\tentt
-%\global\setbox\dblarrowbox = \hbox to 1em{\hfil$\Rightarrow$\hfil}
-%\global\setbox\longdblarrowbox = \hbox to 1em{\hfil$\mapsto$\hfil}
-%\global\setbox\pushcharbox = \hbox to 1em{\hfil$\dashv$\hfil}
-%\global\setbox\equivbox = \hbox to 1em{\hfil$\ptexequiv$\hfil}
-% Adapted from the manmac format (p.420 of TeXbook)
-%\global\setbox\bullbox = \hbox to 1em{\kern.15em\vrule height .75ex width .85ex
-%                                      depth .1ex\hfil}
-%}
-
-% @point{}, @result{}, @expansion{}, @print{}, @equiv{}.
-\def\point{$\star$}
-\def\result{\leavevmode\raise.15ex\hbox to 1em{\hfil$\Rightarrow$\hfil}}
-\def\expansion{\leavevmode\raise.1ex\hbox to 1em{\hfil$\mapsto$\hfil}}
-\def\print{\leavevmode\lower.1ex\hbox to 1em{\hfil$\dashv$\hfil}}
-\def\equiv{\leavevmode\lower.1ex\hbox to 1em{\hfil$\ptexequiv$\hfil}}
-
-% Adapted from the TeXbook's \boxit.
-{\tentt \global\dimen0 = 3em}% Width of the box.
-\dimen2 = .55pt % Thickness of rules
-% The text. (`r' is open on the right, `e' somewhat less so on the left.)
-\setbox0 = \hbox{\kern-.75pt \tensf error\kern-1.5pt}
-
-\global\setbox\errorbox=\hbox to \dimen0{\hfil
-   \hsize = \dimen0 \advance\hsize by -5.8pt % Space to left+right.
-   \advance\hsize by -2\dimen2 % Rules.
-   \vbox{
-      \hrule height\dimen2
-      \hbox{\vrule width\dimen2 \kern3pt          % Space to left of text.
-         \vtop{\kern2.4pt \box0 \kern2.4pt}% Space above/below.
-         \kern3pt\vrule width\dimen2}% Space to right.
-      \hrule height\dimen2}
-    \hfil}
-
-% The @error{} command.
-\def\error{\leavevmode\lower.7ex\copy\errorbox}
-
-% @tex ... @end tex    escapes into raw Tex temporarily.
-% One exception: @ is still an escape character, so that @end tex works.
-% But \@ or @@ will get a plain tex @ character.
-
-\def\tex{\begingroup
-  \catcode `\\=0 \catcode `\{=1 \catcode `\}=2
-  \catcode `\$=3 \catcode `\&=4 \catcode `\#=6
-  \catcode `\^=7 \catcode `\_=8 \catcode `\~=13 \let~=\tie
-  \catcode `\%=14
-  \catcode 43=12 % plus
-  \catcode`\"=12
-  \catcode`\==12
-  \catcode`\|=12
-  \catcode`\<=12
-  \catcode`\>=12
-  \escapechar=`\\
-  %
-  \let\b=\ptexb
-  \let\bullet=\ptexbullet
-  \let\c=\ptexc
-  \let\,=\ptexcomma
-  \let\.=\ptexdot
-  \let\dots=\ptexdots
-  \let\equiv=\ptexequiv
-  \let\!=\ptexexclam
-  \let\i=\ptexi
-  \let\{=\ptexlbrace
-  \let\+=\tabalign
-  \let\}=\ptexrbrace
-  \let\*=\ptexstar
-  \let\t=\ptext
-  %
-  \def\endldots{\mathinner{\ldots\ldots\ldots\ldots}}%
-  \def\enddots{\relax\ifmmode\endldots\else$\mathsurround=0pt \endldots\,$\fi}%
-  \def\@{@}%
-\let\Etex=\endgroup}
-
-% Define @lisp ... @endlisp.
-% @lisp does a \begingroup so it can rebind things,
-% including the definition of @endlisp (which normally is erroneous).
-
-% Amount to narrow the margins by for @lisp.
-\newskip\lispnarrowing \lispnarrowing=0.4in
-
-% This is the definition that ^^M gets inside @lisp, @example, and other
-% such environments.  \null is better than a space, since it doesn't
-% have any width.
-\def\lisppar{\null\endgraf}
-
-% Make each space character in the input produce a normal interword
-% space in the output.  Don't allow a line break at this space, as this
-% is used only in environments like @example, where each line of input
-% should produce a line of output anyway.
-%
-{\obeyspaces %
-\gdef\sepspaces{\obeyspaces\let =\tie}}
-
-% Define \obeyedspace to be our active space, whatever it is.  This is
-% for use in \parsearg.
-{\sepspaces%
-\global\let\obeyedspace= }
-
-% This space is always present above and below environments.
-\newskip\envskipamount \envskipamount = 0pt
-
-% Make spacing and below environment symmetrical.  We use \parskip here
-% to help in doing that, since in @example-like environments \parskip
-% is reset to zero; thus the \afterenvbreak inserts no space -- but the
-% start of the next paragraph will insert \parskip
-%
-\def\aboveenvbreak{{\advance\envskipamount by \parskip
-\endgraf \ifdim\lastskip<\envskipamount
-\removelastskip \penalty-50 \vskip\envskipamount \fi}}
-
-\let\afterenvbreak = \aboveenvbreak
-
-% \nonarrowing is a flag.  If "set", @lisp etc don't narrow margins.
-\let\nonarrowing=\relax
-
-% @cartouche ... @end cartouche: draw rectangle w/rounded corners around
-% environment contents.
-\font\circle=lcircle10
-\newdimen\circthick
-\newdimen\cartouter\newdimen\cartinner
-\newskip\normbskip\newskip\normpskip\newskip\normlskip
-\circthick=\fontdimen8\circle
-%
-\def\ctl{{\circle\char'013\hskip -6pt}}% 6pt from pl file: 1/2charwidth
-\def\ctr{{\hskip 6pt\circle\char'010}}
-\def\cbl{{\circle\char'012\hskip -6pt}}
-\def\cbr{{\hskip 6pt\circle\char'011}}
-\def\carttop{\hbox to \cartouter{\hskip\lskip
-        \ctl\leaders\hrule height\circthick\hfil\ctr
-        \hskip\rskip}}
-\def\cartbot{\hbox to \cartouter{\hskip\lskip
-        \cbl\leaders\hrule height\circthick\hfil\cbr
-        \hskip\rskip}}
-%
-\newskip\lskip\newskip\rskip
-
-\long\def\cartouche{%
-\begingroup
-        \lskip=\leftskip \rskip=\rightskip
-        \leftskip=0pt\rightskip=0pt %we want these *outside*.
-        \cartinner=\hsize \advance\cartinner by-\lskip
-                          \advance\cartinner by-\rskip
-        \cartouter=\hsize
-        \advance\cartouter by 18.4pt % allow for 3pt kerns on either
-%                                    side, and for 6pt waste from
-%                                    each corner char, and rule thickness
-        \normbskip=\baselineskip \normpskip=\parskip \normlskip=\lineskip
-        % Flag to tell @lisp, etc., not to narrow margin.
-        \let\nonarrowing=\comment
-        \vbox\bgroup
-                \baselineskip=0pt\parskip=0pt\lineskip=0pt
-                \carttop
-                \hbox\bgroup
-                        \hskip\lskip
-                        \vrule\kern3pt
-                        \vbox\bgroup
-                                \hsize=\cartinner
-                                \kern3pt
-                                \begingroup
-                                        \baselineskip=\normbskip
-                                        \lineskip=\normlskip
-                                        \parskip=\normpskip
-                                        \vskip -\parskip
-\def\Ecartouche{%
-                                \endgroup
-                                \kern3pt
-                        \egroup
-                        \kern3pt\vrule
-                        \hskip\rskip
-                \egroup
-                \cartbot
-        \egroup
-\endgroup
-}}
-
-
-% This macro is called at the beginning of all the @example variants,
-% inside a group.
-\def\nonfillstart{%
-  \aboveenvbreak
-  \inENV % This group ends at the end of the body
-  \hfuzz = 12pt % Don't be fussy
-  \sepspaces % Make spaces be word-separators rather than space tokens.
-  \singlespace
-  \let\par = \lisppar % don't ignore blank lines
-  \obeylines % each line of input is a line of output
-  \parskip = 0pt
-  \parindent = 0pt
-  \emergencystretch = 0pt % don't try to avoid overfull boxes
-  % @cartouche defines \nonarrowing to inhibit narrowing
-  % at next level down.
-  \ifx\nonarrowing\relax
-    \advance \leftskip by \lispnarrowing
-    \exdentamount=\lispnarrowing
-    \let\exdent=\nofillexdent
-    \let\nonarrowing=\relax
-  \fi
-}
-
-% Define the \E... control sequence only if we are inside the particular
-% environment, so the error checking in \end will work.
-% 
-% To end an @example-like environment, we first end the paragraph (via
-% \afterenvbreak's vertical glue), and then the group.  That way we keep
-% the zero \parskip that the environments set -- \parskip glue will be
-% inserted at the beginning of the next paragraph in the document, after
-% the environment.
-%
-\def\nonfillfinish{\afterenvbreak\endgroup}
-
-% @lisp: indented, narrowed, typewriter font.
-\def\lisp{\begingroup
-  \nonfillstart
-  \let\Elisp = \nonfillfinish
-  \tt
-  \let\kbdfont = \kbdexamplefont % Allow @kbd to do something special.
-  \gobble       % eat return
-}
-
-% @example: Same as @lisp.
-\def\example{\begingroup \def\Eexample{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\lisp}
-
-% @small... is usually equivalent to the non-small (@smallbook
-% redefines).  We must call \example (or whatever) last in the
-% definition, since it reads the return following the @example (or
-% whatever) command.
-% 
-% This actually allows (for example) @end display inside an
-% @smalldisplay.  Too bad, but makeinfo will catch the error anyway.
-%
-\def\smalldisplay{\begingroup\def\Esmalldisplay{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\display}
-\def\smallexample{\begingroup\def\Esmallexample{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\lisp}
-\def\smallformat{\begingroup\def\Esmallformat{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\format}
-\def\smalllisp{\begingroup\def\Esmalllisp{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\lisp}
-
-% Real @smallexample and @smalllisp (when @smallbook): use smaller fonts.
-% Originally contributed by Pavel@xerox.
-\def\smalllispx{\begingroup
-  \def\Esmalllisp{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}%
-  \def\Esmallexample{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}%
-  \indexfonts
-  \lisp
-}
-
-% @display: same as @lisp except keep current font.
-%
-\def\display{\begingroup
-  \nonfillstart
-  \let\Edisplay = \nonfillfinish
-  \gobble
-}
-
-% @smalldisplay (when @smallbook): @display plus smaller fonts.
-%
-\def\smalldisplayx{\begingroup
-  \def\Esmalldisplay{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}%
-  \indexfonts \rm
-  \display
-}
-
-% @format: same as @display except don't narrow margins.
-%
-\def\format{\begingroup
-  \let\nonarrowing = t
-  \nonfillstart
-  \let\Eformat = \nonfillfinish
-  \gobble
-}
-
-% @smallformat (when @smallbook): @format plus smaller fonts.
-%
-\def\smallformatx{\begingroup
-  \def\Esmallformat{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}%
-  \indexfonts \rm
-  \format
-}
-
-% @flushleft (same as @format).
-%
-\def\flushleft{\begingroup \def\Eflushleft{\nonfillfinish\endgroup}\format}
-
-% @flushright.
-% 
-\def\flushright{\begingroup
-  \let\nonarrowing = t
-  \nonfillstart
-  \let\Eflushright = \nonfillfinish
-  \advance\leftskip by 0pt plus 1fill
-  \gobble
-}
-
-% @quotation does normal linebreaking (hence we can't use \nonfillstart)
-% and narrows the margins.
-%
-\def\quotation{%
-  \begingroup\inENV %This group ends at the end of the @quotation body
-  {\parskip=0pt \aboveenvbreak}% because \aboveenvbreak inserts \parskip
-  \singlespace
-  \parindent=0pt
-  % We have retained a nonzero parskip for the environment, since we're
-  % doing normal filling. So to avoid extra space below the environment...
-  \def\Equotation{\parskip = 0pt \nonfillfinish}%
-  %
-  % @cartouche defines \nonarrowing to inhibit narrowing at next level down.
-  \ifx\nonarrowing\relax
-    \advance\leftskip by \lispnarrowing
-    \advance\rightskip by \lispnarrowing
-    \exdentamount = \lispnarrowing
-    \let\nonarrowing = \relax
-  \fi
-}
-
-
-\message{defuns,}
-% Define formatter for defuns
-% First, allow user to change definition object font (\df) internally
-\def\setdeffont #1 {\csname DEF#1\endcsname}
-
-\newskip\defbodyindent \defbodyindent=.4in
-\newskip\defargsindent \defargsindent=50pt
-\newskip\deftypemargin \deftypemargin=12pt
-\newskip\deflastargmargin \deflastargmargin=18pt
-
-\newcount\parencount
-% define \functionparens, which makes ( and ) and & do special things.
-% \functionparens affects the group it is contained in.
-\def\activeparens{%
-\catcode`\(=\active \catcode`\)=\active \catcode`\&=\active
-\catcode`\[=\active \catcode`\]=\active}
-
-% Make control sequences which act like normal parenthesis chars.
-\let\lparen = ( \let\rparen = )
-
-{\activeparens % Now, smart parens don't turn on until &foo (see \amprm)
-
-% Be sure that we always have a definition for `(', etc.  For example,
-% if the fn name has parens in it, \boldbrax will not be in effect yet,
-% so TeX would otherwise complain about undefined control sequence.
-\global\let(=\lparen \global\let)=\rparen
-\global\let[=\lbrack \global\let]=\rbrack
-
-\gdef\functionparens{\boldbrax\let&=\amprm\parencount=0 }
-\gdef\boldbrax{\let(=\opnr\let)=\clnr\let[=\lbrb\let]=\rbrb}
-% This is used to turn on special parens
-% but make & act ordinary (given that it's active).
-\gdef\boldbraxnoamp{\let(=\opnr\let)=\clnr\let[=\lbrb\let]=\rbrb\let&=\ampnr}
-
-% Definitions of (, ) and & used in args for functions.
-% This is the definition of ( outside of all parentheses.
-\gdef\oprm#1 {{\rm\char`\(}#1 \bf \let(=\opnested
-  \global\advance\parencount by 1
-}
-%
-% This is the definition of ( when already inside a level of parens.
-\gdef\opnested{\char`\(\global\advance\parencount by 1 }
-%
-\gdef\clrm{% Print a paren in roman if it is taking us back to depth of 0.
-  % also in that case restore the outer-level definition of (.
-  \ifnum \parencount=1 {\rm \char `\)}\sl \let(=\oprm \else \char `\) \fi
-  \global\advance \parencount by -1 }
-% If we encounter &foo, then turn on ()-hacking afterwards
-\gdef\amprm#1 {{\rm\&#1}\let(=\oprm \let)=\clrm\ }
-%
-\gdef\normalparens{\boldbrax\let&=\ampnr}
-} % End of definition inside \activeparens
-%% These parens (in \boldbrax) actually are a little bolder than the
-%% contained text.  This is especially needed for [ and ]
-\def\opnr{{\sf\char`\(}\global\advance\parencount by 1 }
-\def\clnr{{\sf\char`\)}\global\advance\parencount by -1 }
-\def\ampnr{\&}
-\def\lbrb{{\bf\char`\[}}
-\def\rbrb{{\bf\char`\]}}
-
-% First, defname, which formats the header line itself.
-% #1 should be the function name.
-% #2 should be the type of definition, such as "Function".
-
-\def\defname #1#2{%
-% Get the values of \leftskip and \rightskip as they were
-% outside the @def...
-\dimen2=\leftskip
-\advance\dimen2 by -\defbodyindent
-\noindent
-\setbox0=\hbox{\hskip \deflastargmargin{\rm #2}\hskip \deftypemargin}%
-\dimen0=\hsize \advance \dimen0 by -\wd0 % compute size for first line
-\dimen1=\hsize \advance \dimen1 by -\defargsindent %size for continuations
-\parshape 2 0in \dimen0 \defargsindent \dimen1
-% Now output arg 2 ("Function" or some such)
-% ending at \deftypemargin from the right margin,
-% but stuck inside a box of width 0 so it does not interfere with linebreaking
-{% Adjust \hsize to exclude the ambient margins,
-% so that \rightline will obey them.
-\advance \hsize by -\dimen2
-\rlap{\rightline{{\rm #2}\hskip -1.25pc }}}%
-% Make all lines underfull and no complaints:
-\tolerance=10000 \hbadness=10000
-\advance\leftskip by -\defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-{\df #1}\enskip        % Generate function name
-}
-
-% Actually process the body of a definition
-% #1 should be the terminating control sequence, such as \Edefun.
-% #2 should be the "another name" control sequence, such as \defunx.
-% #3 should be the control sequence that actually processes the header,
-%    such as \defunheader.
-
-\def\defparsebody #1#2#3{\begingroup\inENV% Environment for definitionbody
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2{\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit#3}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup %
-\catcode 61=\active % 61 is `='
-\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit#3}
-
-% #1 is the \E... control sequence to end the definition (which we define).
-% #2 is the \...x control sequence for consecutive fns (which we define).
-% #3 is the control sequence to call to resume processing.
-% #4, delimited by the space, is the class name.
-% 
-\def\defmethparsebody#1#2#3#4 {\begingroup\inENV %
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2##1 {\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{##1}}}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{#4}}}
-
-% @deftypemethod has an extra argument that nothing else does.  Sigh.
-% #1 is the \E... control sequence to end the definition (which we define).
-% #2 is the \...x control sequence for consecutive fns (which we define).
-% #3 is the control sequence to call to resume processing.
-% #4, delimited by the space, is the class name.
-% #5 is the method's return type.
-% 
-\def\deftypemethparsebody#1#2#3#4 #5 {\begingroup\inENV %
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2##1 ##2 {\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{##1}{##2}}}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{#4}{#5}}}
-
-\def\defopparsebody #1#2#3#4#5 {\begingroup\inENV %
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2##1 ##2 {\def#4{##1}%
-\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{##2}}}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup\obeylines\activeparens\spacesplit{#3{#5}}}
-
-% These parsing functions are similar to the preceding ones
-% except that they do not make parens into active characters.
-% These are used for "variables" since they have no arguments.
-
-\def\defvarparsebody #1#2#3{\begingroup\inENV% Environment for definitionbody
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2{\begingroup\obeylines\spacesplit#3}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup %
-\catcode 61=\active %
-\obeylines\spacesplit#3}
-
-% This is used for \def{tp,vr}parsebody.  It could probably be used for
-% some of the others, too, with some judicious conditionals.
-%
-\def\parsebodycommon#1#2#3{%
-  \begingroup\inENV %
-  \medbreak %
-  % Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-  % so that it will exit this group.
-  \def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-  \def#2##1 {\begingroup\obeylines\spacesplit{#3{##1}}}%
-  \parindent=0in
-  \advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-  \exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-  \begingroup\obeylines
-}
-
-\def\defvrparsebody#1#2#3#4 {%
-  \parsebodycommon{#1}{#2}{#3}%
-  \spacesplit{#3{#4}}%
-}
-
-% This loses on `@deftp {Data Type} {struct termios}' -- it thinks the
-% type is just `struct', because we lose the braces in `{struct
-% termios}' when \spacesplit reads its undelimited argument.  Sigh.
-% \let\deftpparsebody=\defvrparsebody
-%
-% So, to get around this, we put \empty in with the type name.  That
-% way, TeX won't find exactly `{...}' as an undelimited argument, and
-% won't strip off the braces.
-%
-\def\deftpparsebody #1#2#3#4 {%
-  \parsebodycommon{#1}{#2}{#3}%
-  \spacesplit{\parsetpheaderline{#3{#4}}}\empty
-}
-
-% Fine, but then we have to eventually remove the \empty *and* the
-% braces (if any).  That's what this does.
-%
-\def\removeemptybraces\empty#1\relax{#1}
-
-% After \spacesplit has done its work, this is called -- #1 is the final
-% thing to call, #2 the type name (which starts with \empty), and #3
-% (which might be empty) the arguments.
-%
-\def\parsetpheaderline#1#2#3{%
-  #1{\removeemptybraces#2\relax}{#3}%
-}%
-
-\def\defopvarparsebody #1#2#3#4#5 {\begingroup\inENV %
-\medbreak %
-% Define the end token that this defining construct specifies
-% so that it will exit this group.
-\def#1{\endgraf\endgroup\medbreak}%
-\def#2##1 ##2 {\def#4{##1}%
-\begingroup\obeylines\spacesplit{#3{##2}}}%
-\parindent=0in
-\advance\leftskip by \defbodyindent
-\exdentamount=\defbodyindent
-\begingroup\obeylines\spacesplit{#3{#5}}}
-
-% Split up #2 at the first space token.
-% call #1 with two arguments:
-%  the first is all of #2 before the space token,
-%  the second is all of #2 after that space token.
-% If #2 contains no space token, all of it is passed as the first arg
-% and the second is passed as empty.
-
-{\obeylines
-\gdef\spacesplit#1#2^^M{\endgroup\spacesplitfoo{#1}#2 \relax\spacesplitfoo}%
-\long\gdef\spacesplitfoo#1#2 #3#4\spacesplitfoo{%
-\ifx\relax #3%
-#1{#2}{}\else #1{#2}{#3#4}\fi}}
-
-% So much for the things common to all kinds of definitions.
-
-% Define @defun.
-
-% First, define the processing that is wanted for arguments of \defun
-% Use this to expand the args and terminate the paragraph they make up
-
-\def\defunargs #1{\functionparens \sl
-% Expand, preventing hyphenation at `-' chars.
-% Note that groups don't affect changes in \hyphenchar.
-\hyphenchar\tensl=0
-#1%
-\hyphenchar\tensl=45
-\ifnum\parencount=0 \else \errmessage{Unbalanced parentheses in @def}\fi%
-\interlinepenalty=10000
-\advance\rightskip by 0pt plus 1fil
-\endgraf\nobreak\vskip -\parskip\nobreak
-}
-
-\def\deftypefunargs #1{%
-% Expand, preventing hyphenation at `-' chars.
-% Note that groups don't affect changes in \hyphenchar.
-% Use \boldbraxnoamp, not \functionparens, so that & is not special.
-\boldbraxnoamp
-\tclose{#1}% avoid \code because of side effects on active chars
-\interlinepenalty=10000
-\advance\rightskip by 0pt plus 1fil
-\endgraf\nobreak\vskip -\parskip\nobreak
-}
-
-% Do complete processing of one @defun or @defunx line already parsed.
-
-% @deffn Command forward-char nchars
-
-\def\deffn{\defmethparsebody\Edeffn\deffnx\deffnheader}
-
-\def\deffnheader #1#2#3{\doind {fn}{\code{#2}}%
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{#1}\defunargs{#3}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% @defun == @deffn Function
-
-\def\defun{\defparsebody\Edefun\defunx\defunheader}
-
-\def\defunheader #1#2{\doind {fn}{\code{#1}}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup\defname {#1}{Function}%
-\defunargs {#2}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% @deftypefun int foobar (int @var{foo}, float @var{bar})
-
-\def\deftypefun{\defparsebody\Edeftypefun\deftypefunx\deftypefunheader}
-
-% #1 is the data type.  #2 is the name and args.
-\def\deftypefunheader #1#2{\deftypefunheaderx{#1}#2 \relax}
-% #1 is the data type, #2 the name, #3 the args.
-\def\deftypefunheaderx #1#2 #3\relax{%
-\doind {fn}{\code{#2}}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup\defname {\defheaderxcond#1\relax$$$#2}{Function}%
-\deftypefunargs {#3}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% @deftypefn {Library Function} int foobar (int @var{foo}, float @var{bar})
-
-\def\deftypefn{\defmethparsebody\Edeftypefn\deftypefnx\deftypefnheader}
-
-% \defheaderxcond#1\relax$$$
-% puts #1 in @code, followed by a space, but does nothing if #1 is null.
-\def\defheaderxcond#1#2$$${\ifx#1\relax\else\code{#1#2} \fi}
-
-% #1 is the classification.  #2 is the data type.  #3 is the name and args.
-\def\deftypefnheader #1#2#3{\deftypefnheaderx{#1}{#2}#3 \relax}
-% #1 is the classification, #2 the data type, #3 the name, #4 the args.
-\def\deftypefnheaderx #1#2#3 #4\relax{%
-\doind {fn}{\code{#3}}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup
-\normalparens % notably, turn off `&' magic, which prevents
-%               at least some C++ text from working
-\defname {\defheaderxcond#2\relax$$$#3}{#1}%
-\deftypefunargs {#4}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% @defmac == @deffn Macro
-
-\def\defmac{\defparsebody\Edefmac\defmacx\defmacheader}
-
-\def\defmacheader #1#2{\doind {fn}{\code{#1}}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup\defname {#1}{Macro}%
-\defunargs {#2}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% @defspec == @deffn Special Form
-
-\def\defspec{\defparsebody\Edefspec\defspecx\defspecheader}
-
-\def\defspecheader #1#2{\doind {fn}{\code{#1}}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup\defname {#1}{Special Form}%
-\defunargs {#2}\endgroup %
-\catcode 61=\other % Turn off change made in \defparsebody
-}
-
-% This definition is run if you use @defunx
-% anywhere other than immediately after a @defun or @defunx.
-
-\def\deffnx #1 {\errmessage{@deffnx in invalid context}}
-\def\defunx #1 {\errmessage{@defunx in invalid context}}
-\def\defmacx #1 {\errmessage{@defmacx in invalid context}}
-\def\defspecx #1 {\errmessage{@defspecx in invalid context}}
-\def\deftypefnx #1 {\errmessage{@deftypefnx in invalid context}}
-\def\deftypemethodx #1 {\errmessage{@deftypemethodx in invalid context}}
-\def\deftypefunx #1 {\errmessage{@deftypefunx in invalid context}}
-
-% @defmethod, and so on
-
-% @defop CATEGORY CLASS OPERATION ARG...
-
-\def\defop #1 {\def\defoptype{#1}%
-\defopparsebody\Edefop\defopx\defopheader\defoptype}
-
-\def\defopheader #1#2#3{%
-\dosubind {fn}{\code{#2}}{\putwordon\ #1}% Make entry in function index
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{\defoptype{} on #1}%
-\defunargs {#3}\endgroup %
-}
-
-% @deftypemethod CLASS RETURN-TYPE METHOD ARG...
-%
-\def\deftypemethod{%
-  \deftypemethparsebody\Edeftypemethod\deftypemethodx\deftypemethodheader}
-%
-% #1 is the class name, #2 the data type, #3 the method name, #4 the args.
-\def\deftypemethodheader#1#2#3#4{%
-  \dosubind{fn}{\code{#3}}{\putwordon\ \code{#1}}% entry in function index
-  \begingroup
-    \defname{\defheaderxcond#2\relax$$$#3}{\putwordMethodon\ \code{#1}}%
-    \deftypefunargs{#4}%
-  \endgroup
-}
-
-% @defmethod == @defop Method
-%
-\def\defmethod{\defmethparsebody\Edefmethod\defmethodx\defmethodheader}
-%
-% #1 is the class name, #2 the method name, #3 the args.
-\def\defmethodheader#1#2#3{%
-  \dosubind{fn}{\code{#2}}{\putwordon\ \code{#1}}% entry in function index
-  \begingroup
-    \defname{#2}{\putwordMethodon\ \code{#1}}%
-    \defunargs{#3}%
-  \endgroup
-}
-
-% @defcv {Class Option} foo-class foo-flag
-
-\def\defcv #1 {\def\defcvtype{#1}%
-\defopvarparsebody\Edefcv\defcvx\defcvarheader\defcvtype}
-
-\def\defcvarheader #1#2#3{%
-\dosubind {vr}{\code{#2}}{of #1}% Make entry in var index
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{\defcvtype{} of #1}%
-\defvarargs {#3}\endgroup %
-}
-
-% @defivar == @defcv {Instance Variable}
-
-\def\defivar{\defvrparsebody\Edefivar\defivarx\defivarheader}
-
-\def\defivarheader #1#2#3{%
-\dosubind {vr}{\code{#2}}{of #1}% Make entry in var index
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{Instance Variable of #1}%
-\defvarargs {#3}\endgroup %
-}
-
-% These definitions are run if you use @defmethodx, etc.,
-% anywhere other than immediately after a @defmethod, etc.
-
-\def\defopx #1 {\errmessage{@defopx in invalid context}}
-\def\defmethodx #1 {\errmessage{@defmethodx in invalid context}}
-\def\defcvx #1 {\errmessage{@defcvx in invalid context}}
-\def\defivarx #1 {\errmessage{@defivarx in invalid context}}
-
-% Now @defvar
-
-% First, define the processing that is wanted for arguments of @defvar.
-% This is actually simple: just print them in roman.
-% This must expand the args and terminate the paragraph they make up
-\def\defvarargs #1{\normalparens #1%
-\interlinepenalty=10000
-\endgraf\nobreak\vskip -\parskip\nobreak}
-
-% @defvr Counter foo-count
-
-\def\defvr{\defvrparsebody\Edefvr\defvrx\defvrheader}
-
-\def\defvrheader #1#2#3{\doind {vr}{\code{#2}}%
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{#1}\defvarargs{#3}\endgroup}
-
-% @defvar == @defvr Variable
-
-\def\defvar{\defvarparsebody\Edefvar\defvarx\defvarheader}
-
-\def\defvarheader #1#2{\doind {vr}{\code{#1}}% Make entry in var index
-\begingroup\defname {#1}{Variable}%
-\defvarargs {#2}\endgroup %
-}
-
-% @defopt == @defvr {User Option}
-
-\def\defopt{\defvarparsebody\Edefopt\defoptx\defoptheader}
-
-\def\defoptheader #1#2{\doind {vr}{\code{#1}}% Make entry in var index
-\begingroup\defname {#1}{User Option}%
-\defvarargs {#2}\endgroup %
-}
-
-% @deftypevar int foobar
-
-\def\deftypevar{\defvarparsebody\Edeftypevar\deftypevarx\deftypevarheader}
-
-% #1 is the data type.  #2 is the name, perhaps followed by text that
-% is actually part of the data type, which should not be put into the index.
-\def\deftypevarheader #1#2{%
-\dovarind#2 \relax% Make entry in variables index
-\begingroup\defname {\defheaderxcond#1\relax$$$#2}{Variable}%
-\interlinepenalty=10000
-\endgraf\nobreak\vskip -\parskip\nobreak
-\endgroup}
-\def\dovarind#1 #2\relax{\doind{vr}{\code{#1}}}
-
-% @deftypevr {Global Flag} int enable
-
-\def\deftypevr{\defvrparsebody\Edeftypevr\deftypevrx\deftypevrheader}
-
-\def\deftypevrheader #1#2#3{\dovarind#3 \relax%
-\begingroup\defname {\defheaderxcond#2\relax$$$#3}{#1}
-\interlinepenalty=10000
-\endgraf\nobreak\vskip -\parskip\nobreak
-\endgroup}
-
-% This definition is run if you use @defvarx
-% anywhere other than immediately after a @defvar or @defvarx.
-
-\def\defvrx #1 {\errmessage{@defvrx in invalid context}}
-\def\defvarx #1 {\errmessage{@defvarx in invalid context}}
-\def\defoptx #1 {\errmessage{@defoptx in invalid context}}
-\def\deftypevarx #1 {\errmessage{@deftypevarx in invalid context}}
-\def\deftypevrx #1 {\errmessage{@deftypevrx in invalid context}}
-
-% Now define @deftp
-% Args are printed in bold, a slight difference from @defvar.
-
-\def\deftpargs #1{\bf \defvarargs{#1}}
-
-% @deftp Class window height width ...
-
-\def\deftp{\deftpparsebody\Edeftp\deftpx\deftpheader}
-
-\def\deftpheader #1#2#3{\doind {tp}{\code{#2}}%
-\begingroup\defname {#2}{#1}\deftpargs{#3}\endgroup}
-
-% This definition is run if you use @deftpx, etc
-% anywhere other than immediately after a @deftp, etc.
-
-\def\deftpx #1 {\errmessage{@deftpx in invalid context}}
-
-
-\message{macros,}
-% @macro.
-
-% To do this right we need a feature of e-TeX, \scantokens, 
-% which we arrange to emulate with a temporary file in ordinary TeX.
-\ifx\eTeXversion\undefined
- \newwrite\macscribble
- \def\scanmacro#1{%
-   \begingroup \newlinechar`\^^M
-   \immediate\openout\macscribble=\jobname.tmp
-   \immediate\write\macscribble{#1}%
-   \immediate\closeout\macscribble
-   \let\xeatspaces\eatspaces
-   \input \jobname.tmp
-   \endgroup
-}
-\else
-\def\scanmacro#1{%
-\begingroup \newlinechar`\^^M
-\let\xeatspaces\eatspaces\scantokens{#1}\endgroup}
-\fi
-
-\newcount\paramno   % Count of parameters
-\newtoks\macname    % Macro name
-\newif\ifrecursive  % Is it recursive?
-
-% Utility routines.
-% Thisdoes \let #1 = #2, except with \csnames.
-\def\cslet#1#2{%
-\expandafter\expandafter
-\expandafter\let
-\expandafter\expandafter
-\csname#1\endcsname
-\csname#2\endcsname}
-
-% Trim leading and trailing spaces off a string.
-% Concepts from aro-bend problem 15 (see CTAN).
-{\catcode`\@=11
-\gdef\eatspaces #1{\expandafter\trim@\expandafter{#1 }}
-\gdef\trim@ #1{\trim@@ @#1 @ #1 @ @@}
-\gdef\trim@@ #1@ #2@ #3@@{\trim@@@\empty #2 @}
-\def\unbrace#1{#1}
-\unbrace{\gdef\trim@@@ #1 } #2@{#1}
-}
-
-% Trim a single trailing ^^M off a string.
-{\catcode`\^^M=12\catcode`\Q=3%
-\gdef\eatcr #1{\eatcra #1Q^^MQ}%
-\gdef\eatcra#1^^MQ{\eatcrb#1Q}%
-\gdef\eatcrb#1Q#2Q{#1}%
-}
-
-% Macro bodies are absorbed as an argument in a context where
-% all characters are catcode 10, 11 or 12, except \ which is active
-% (as in normal texinfo). It is necessary to change the definition of \.
-
-% It's necessary to have hard CRs when the macro is executed. This is 
-% done by  making ^^M (\endlinechar) catcode 12 when reading the macro 
-% body, and then making it the \newlinechar in \scanmacro.
-
-\def\macrobodyctxt{%
-  \catcode`\~=12
-  \catcode`\^=12
-  \catcode`\_=12
-  \catcode`\|=12
-  \catcode`\<=12
-  \catcode`\>=12
-  \catcode`\+=12
-  \catcode`\{=12
-  \catcode`\}=12
-  \catcode`\@=12
-  \catcode`\^^M=12
-  \usembodybackslash}
-
-\def\macroargctxt{%
-  \catcode`\~=12
-  \catcode`\^=12
-  \catcode`\_=12
-  \catcode`\|=12
-  \catcode`\<=12
-  \catcode`\>=12
-  \catcode`\+=12
-  \catcode`\@=12
-  \catcode`\\=12}
-
-% \mbodybackslash is the definition of \ in @macro bodies.
-% It maps \foo\ => \csname macarg.foo\endcsname => #N 
-% where N is the macro parameter number.
-% We define \csname macarg.\endcsname to be \realbackslash, so
-% \\ in macro replacement text gets you a backslash.
-
-{\catcode`@=0 @catcode`@\=@active
- @gdef@usembodybackslash{@let\=@mbodybackslash}
- @gdef@mbodybackslash#1\{@csname macarg.#1@endcsname}
-}
-\expandafter\def\csname macarg.\endcsname{\realbackslash}
-
-\def\macro{\recursivefalse\parsearg\macroxxx}
-\def\rmacro{\recursivetrue\parsearg\macroxxx}
-
-\def\macroxxx#1{%
-  \getargs{#1}%           now \macname is the macname and \argl the arglist
-  \ifx\argl\empty       % no arguments
-     \paramno=0%
-  \else
-     \expandafter\parsemargdef \argl;% 
-  \fi
-  \expandafter\ifx \csname macsave.\the\macname\endcsname \relax
-     \cslet{macsave.\the\macname}{\the\macname}%
-  \else
-     \message{Warning: redefining \the\macname}%
-  \fi
-  \begingroup \macrobodyctxt
-  \ifrecursive \expandafter\parsermacbody
-  \else \expandafter\parsemacbody 
-  \fi}
-
-\def\unmacro{\parsearg\unmacroxxx}
-\def\unmacroxxx#1{%
-  \expandafter\ifx \csname macsave.\the\macname\endcsname \relax
-    \errmessage{Macro \the\macname\ not defined.}%
-  \else
-    \cslet{#1}{macsave.#1}%
-    \expandafter\let \csname macsave.\the\macname\endcsname \undefined
-  \fi
-}
-
-% This makes use of the obscure feature that if the last token of a
-% <parameter list> is #, then the preceding argument is delimited by
-% an opening brace, and that opening brace is not consumed.
-\def\getargs#1{\getargsxxx#1{}}
-\def\getargsxxx#1#{\getmacname #1 \relax\getmacargs}
-\def\getmacname #1 #2\relax{\macname={#1}}
-\def\getmacargs#1{\def\argl{#1}}
-
-% Parse the optional {params} list.  Set up \paramno and \paramlist
-% so \defmacro knows what to do.  Define \macarg.blah for each blah
-% in the params list, to be ##N where N is the position in that list.
-% That gets used by \mbodybackslash (above).
-
-% We need to get `macro parameter char #' into several definitions.
-% The technique used is stolen from LaTeX:  let \hash be something
-% unexpandable, insert that wherever you need a #, and then redefine
-% it to # just before using the token list produced.
-%
-% The same technique is used to protect \eatspaces till just before
-% the macro is used.
-
-\def\parsemargdef#1;{\paramno=0\def\paramlist{}%
-        \let\hash\relax\let\xeatspaces\relax\parsemargdefxxx#1,;,}
-\def\parsemargdefxxx#1,{%
-  \if#1;\let\next=\relax
-  \else \let\next=\parsemargdefxxx
-    \advance\paramno by 1%
-    \expandafter\edef\csname macarg.\eatspaces{#1}\endcsname
-        {\xeatspaces{\hash\the\paramno}}%
-    \edef\paramlist{\paramlist\hash\the\paramno,}%
-  \fi\next}
-
-% These two commands read recursive and nonrecursive macro bodies.
-% (They're different since rec and nonrec macros end differently.)
-
-\long\def\parsemacbody#1@end macro%
-{\xdef\temp{\eatcr{#1}}\endgroup\defmacro}%
-\long\def\parsermacbody#1@end rmacro%
-{\xdef\temp{\eatcr{#1}}\endgroup\defmacro}%
-
-% This defines the macro itself. There are six cases: recursive and
-% nonrecursive macros of zero, one, and many arguments.
-% Much magic with \expandafter here.
-% \xdef is used so that macro definitions will survive the file
-% they're defined in; @include reads the file inside a group.
-\def\defmacro{%
-  \let\hash=##% convert placeholders to macro parameter chars
-  \ifrecursive
-    \ifcase\paramno
-    % 0
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-        \noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}}%
-    \or % 1
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-         \bgroup\noexpand\macroargctxt
-         \noexpand\braceorline\csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname}%
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname##1{%
-         \egroup\noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}}%
-    \else % many
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-         \bgroup\noexpand\macroargctxt
-         \noexpand\csname\the\macname xx\endcsname}
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname xx\endcsname##1{%
-          \csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname ##1,}%
-      \expandafter\expandafter
-      \expandafter\xdef
-      \expandafter\expandafter
-        \csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname 
-          \paramlist{\egroup\noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}}%
-    \fi
-  \else
-    \ifcase\paramno
-    % 0
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-        \noexpand\norecurse{\the\macname}%
-        \noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}\egroup}%
-    \or % 1
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-         \bgroup\noexpand\macroargctxt
-         \noexpand\braceorline\csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname}%
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname##1{%
-        \egroup
-        \noexpand\norecurse{\the\macname}%
-        \noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}\egroup}%
-    \else % many
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname\endcsname{%
-         \bgroup\noexpand\macroargctxt
-         \noexpand\csname\the\macname xx\endcsname}
-      \expandafter\xdef\csname\the\macname xx\endcsname##1{%
-          \csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname ##1,}%
-      \expandafter\expandafter
-      \expandafter\xdef
-      \expandafter\expandafter
-      \csname\the\macname xxx\endcsname
-      \paramlist{%
-          \egroup
-          \noexpand\norecurse{\the\macname}%
-          \noexpand\scanmacro{\temp}\egroup}%
-    \fi
-  \fi}
-
-\def\norecurse#1{\bgroup\cslet{#1}{macsave.#1}}
-
-% \braceorline decides whether the next nonwhitespace character is a
-% {.  If so it reads up to the closing }, if not, it reads the whole
-% line.  Whatever was read is then fed to the next control sequence
-% as an argument (by \parsebrace or \parsearg)
-\def\braceorline#1{\let\next=#1\futurelet\nchar\braceorlinexxx}
-\def\braceorlinexxx{%
-  \ifx\nchar\bgroup\else
-    \expandafter\parsearg 
-  \fi \next}
-
-
-\message{cross references,}
-\newwrite\auxfile
-
-\newif\ifhavexrefs    % True if xref values are known.
-\newif\ifwarnedxrefs  % True if we warned once that they aren't known.
-
-% @inforef is relatively simple.
-\def\inforef #1{\inforefzzz #1,,,,**}
-\def\inforefzzz #1,#2,#3,#4**{\putwordSee{} \putwordInfo{} \putwordfile{} \file{\ignorespaces #3{}},
-  node \samp{\ignorespaces#1{}}}
-
-% @node's job is to define \lastnode.
-\def\node{\ENVcheck\parsearg\nodezzz}
-\def\nodezzz#1{\nodexxx [#1,]}
-\def\nodexxx[#1,#2]{\gdef\lastnode{#1}}
-\let\nwnode=\node
-\let\lastnode=\relax
-
-% The sectioning commands (@chapter, etc.) call these.
-\def\donoderef{%
-  \ifx\lastnode\relax\else
-    \expandafter\expandafter\expandafter\setref{\lastnode}%
-      {Ysectionnumberandtype}%
-    \global\let\lastnode=\relax
-  \fi
-}
-\def\unnumbnoderef{%
-  \ifx\lastnode\relax\else
-    \expandafter\expandafter\expandafter\setref{\lastnode}{Ynothing}%
-    \global\let\lastnode=\relax
-  \fi
-}
-\def\appendixnoderef{%
-  \ifx\lastnode\relax\else
-    \expandafter\expandafter\expandafter\setref{\lastnode}%
-      {Yappendixletterandtype}%
-    \global\let\lastnode=\relax
-  \fi
-}
-
-
-% @anchor{NAME} -- define xref target at arbitrary point.
-% 
-\def\anchor#1{\setref{#1}{Ynothing}}
-
-
-% \setref{NAME}{SNT} defines a cross-reference point NAME, namely
-% NAME-title, NAME-pg, and NAME-SNT.  Called from \foonoderef.  We have
-% to set \indexdummies so commands such as @code in a section title
-% aren't expanded.  It would be nicer not to expand the titles in the
-% first place, but there's so many layers that that is hard to do.
-% 
-\def\setref#1#2{{%
-  \indexdummies
-  \dosetq{#1-title}{Ytitle}%
-  \dosetq{#1-pg}{Ypagenumber}%
-  \dosetq{#1-snt}{#2}
-}}
-
-% @xref, @pxref, and @ref generate cross-references.  For \xrefX, #1 is
-% the node name, #2 the name of the Info cross-reference, #3 the printed
-% node name, #4 the name of the Info file, #5 the name of the printed
-% manual.  All but the node name can be omitted.
-%
-\def\pxref#1{\putwordsee{} \xrefX[#1,,,,,,,]}
-\def\xref#1{\putwordSee{} \xrefX[#1,,,,,,,]}
-\def\ref#1{\xrefX[#1,,,,,,,]}
-\def\xrefX[#1,#2,#3,#4,#5,#6]{\begingroup
-  \def\printedmanual{\ignorespaces #5}%
-  \def\printednodename{\ignorespaces #3}%
-  \setbox1=\hbox{\printedmanual}%
-  \setbox0=\hbox{\printednodename}%
-  \ifdim \wd0 = 0pt
-    % No printed node name was explicitly given.
-    \expandafter\ifx\csname SETxref-automatic-section-title\endcsname\relax
-      % Use the node name inside the square brackets.
-      \def\printednodename{\ignorespaces #1}%
-    \else
-      % Use the actual chapter/section title appear inside
-      % the square brackets.  Use the real section title if we have it.
-      \ifdim \wd1 > 0pt
-        % It is in another manual, so we don't have it.
-        \def\printednodename{\ignorespaces #1}%
-      \else
-        \ifhavexrefs
-          % We know the real title if we have the xref values.
-          \def\printednodename{\refx{#1-title}{}}%
-        \else
-          % Otherwise just copy the Info node name.
-          \def\printednodename{\ignorespaces #1}%
-        \fi%
-      \fi
-    \fi
-  \fi
-  %
-  % If we use \unhbox0 and \unhbox1 to print the node names, TeX does not
-  % insert empty discretionaries after hyphens, which means that it will
-  % not find a line break at a hyphen in a node names.  Since some manuals
-  % are best written with fairly long node names, containing hyphens, this
-  % is a loss.  Therefore, we give the text of the node name again, so it
-  % is as if TeX is seeing it for the first time.
-  \ifdim \wd1 > 0pt
-    \putwordsection{} ``\printednodename'' in \cite{\printedmanual}%
-  \else
-    % _ (for example) has to be the character _ for the purposes of the
-    % control sequence corresponding to the node, but it has to expand
-    % into the usual \leavevmode...\vrule stuff for purposes of
-    % printing. So we \turnoffactive for the \refx-snt, back on for the
-    % printing, back off for the \refx-pg.
-    {\normalturnoffactive
-     % Only output a following space if the -snt ref is nonempty; for
-     % @unnumbered and @anchor, it won't be.
-     \setbox2 = \hbox{\ignorespaces \refx{#1-snt}{}}%
-     \ifdim \wd2 > 0pt \refx{#1-snt}\space\fi
-    }%
-    % [mynode], 
-    [\printednodename],\space
-    % page 3
-    \turnoffactive \putwordpage\tie\refx{#1-pg}{}%
-  \fi
-\endgroup}
-
-% \dosetq is the interface for calls from other macros
-
-% Use \normalturnoffactive so that punctuation chars such as underscore
-% and backslash work in node names.  (\turnoffactive doesn't do \.)
-\def\dosetq#1#2{%
-  {\let\folio=0
-   \normalturnoffactive
-   \edef\next{\write\auxfile{\internalsetq{#1}{#2}}}%
-   \iflinks
-     \next
-   \fi
-  }%
-}
-
-% \internalsetq {foo}{page} expands into
-% CHARACTERS 'xrdef {foo}{...expansion of \Ypage...}
-% When the aux file is read, ' is the escape character
-
-\def\internalsetq #1#2{'xrdef {#1}{\csname #2\endcsname}}
-
-% Things to be expanded by \internalsetq
-
-\def\Ypagenumber{\folio}
-
-\def\Ytitle{\thissection}
-
-\def\Ynothing{}
-
-\def\Ysectionnumberandtype{%
-\ifnum\secno=0 \putwordChapter\xreftie\the\chapno %
-\else \ifnum \subsecno=0 \putwordSection\xreftie\the\chapno.\the\secno %
-\else \ifnum \subsubsecno=0 %
-\putwordSection\xreftie\the\chapno.\the\secno.\the\subsecno %
-\else %
-\putwordSection\xreftie\the\chapno.\the\secno.\the\subsecno.\the\subsubsecno %
-\fi \fi \fi }
-
-\def\Yappendixletterandtype{%
-\ifnum\secno=0 \putwordAppendix\xreftie'char\the\appendixno{}%
-\else \ifnum \subsecno=0 \putwordSection\xreftie'char\the\appendixno.\the\secno %
-\else \ifnum \subsubsecno=0 %
-\putwordSection\xreftie'char\the\appendixno.\the\secno.\the\subsecno %
-\else %
-\putwordSection\xreftie'char\the\appendixno.\the\secno.\the\subsecno.\the\subsubsecno %
-\fi \fi \fi }
-
-\gdef\xreftie{'tie}
-
-% Use TeX 3.0's \inputlineno to get the line number, for better error
-% messages, but if we're using an old version of TeX, don't do anything.
-%
-\ifx\inputlineno\thisisundefined
-  \let\linenumber = \empty % Non-3.0.
-\else
-  \def\linenumber{\the\inputlineno:\space}
-\fi
-
-% Define \refx{NAME}{SUFFIX} to reference a cross-reference string named NAME.
-% If its value is nonempty, SUFFIX is output afterward.
-
-\def\refx#1#2{%
-  \expandafter\ifx\csname X#1\endcsname\relax
-    % If not defined, say something at least.
-    \angleleft un\-de\-fined\angleright
-    \iflinks
-      \ifhavexrefs
-        \message{\linenumber Undefined cross reference `#1'.}%
-      \else
-        \ifwarnedxrefs\else
-          \global\warnedxrefstrue
-          \message{Cross reference values unknown; you must run TeX again.}%
-        \fi
-      \fi
-    \fi
-  \else
-    % It's defined, so just use it.
-    \csname X#1\endcsname
-  \fi
-  #2% Output the suffix in any case.
-}
-
-% This is the macro invoked by entries in the aux file.
-% 
-\def\xrdef#1{\begingroup
-  % Reenable \ as an escape while reading the second argument.
-  \catcode`\\ = 0
-  \afterassignment\endgroup
-  \expandafter\gdef\csname X#1\endcsname
-}
-
-% Read the last existing aux file, if any.  No error if none exists.
-\def\readauxfile{\begingroup
-  \catcode`\^^@=\other
-  \catcode`\^^A=\other
-  \catcode`\^^B=\other
-  \catcode`\^^C=\other
-  \catcode`\^^D=\other
-  \catcode`\^^E=\other
-  \catcode`\^^F=\other
-  \catcode`\^^G=\other
-  \catcode`\^^H=\other
-  \catcode`\^^K=\other
-  \catcode`\^^L=\other
-  \catcode`\^^N=\other
-  \catcode`\^^P=\other
-  \catcode`\^^Q=\other
-  \catcode`\^^R=\other
-  \catcode`\^^S=\other
-  \catcode`\^^T=\other
-  \catcode`\^^U=\other
-  \catcode`\^^V=\other
-  \catcode`\^^W=\other
-  \catcode`\^^X=\other
-  \catcode`\^^Z=\other
-  \catcode`\^^[=\other
-  \catcode`\^^\=\other
-  \catcode`\^^]=\other
-  \catcode`\^^^=\other
-  \catcode`\^^_=\other
-  \catcode`\@=\other
-  \catcode`\^=\other
-  % It was suggested to define this as 7, which would allow ^^e4 etc.
-  % in xref tags, i.e., node names.  But since ^^e4 notation isn't
-  % supported in the main text, it doesn't seem desirable.  Furthermore,
-  % that is not enough: for node names that actually contain a ^
-  % character, we would end up writing a line like this: 'xrdef {'hat
-  % b-title}{'hat b} and \xrdef does a \csname...\endcsname on the first
-  % argument, and \hat is not an expandable control sequence.  It could
-  % all be worked out, but why?  Either we support ^^ or we don't.
-  %
-  % The other change necessary for this was to define \auxhat:
-  % \def\auxhat{\def^{'hat }}% extra space so ok if followed by letter
-  % and then to call \auxhat in \setq.
-  %
-  \catcode`\~=\other
-  \catcode`\[=\other
-  \catcode`\]=\other
-  \catcode`\"=\other
-  \catcode`\_=\other
-  \catcode`\|=\other
-  \catcode`\<=\other
-  \catcode`\>=\other
-  \catcode`\$=\other
-  \catcode`\#=\other
-  \catcode`\&=\other
-  \catcode`+=\other % avoid \+ for paranoia even though we've turned it off
-  % Make the characters 128-255 be printing characters
-  {%
-    \count 1=128
-    \def\loop{%
-      \catcode\count 1=\other
-      \advance\count 1 by 1
-      \ifnum \count 1<256 \loop \fi
-    }%
-  }%
-  % The aux file uses ' as the escape (for now).
-  % Turn off \ as an escape so we do not lose on
-  % entries which were dumped with control sequences in their names.
-  % For example, 'xrdef {$\leq $-fun}{page ...} made by @defun ^^
-  % Reference to such entries still does not work the way one would wish,
-  % but at least they do not bomb out when the aux file is read in.
-  \catcode`\{=1
-  \catcode`\}=2
-  \catcode`\%=\other
-  \catcode`\'=0
-  \catcode`\\=\other
-  %
-  \openin 1 \jobname.aux
-  \ifeof 1 \else
-    \closein 1
-    \input \jobname.aux
-    \global\havexrefstrue
-    \global\warnedobstrue
-  \fi
-  % Open the new aux file.  TeX will close it automatically at exit.
-  \openout\auxfile=\jobname.aux
-\endgroup}
-
-
-% Footnotes.
-
-\newcount \footnoteno
-
-% The trailing space in the following definition for supereject is
-% vital for proper filling; pages come out unaligned when you do a
-% pagealignmacro call if that space before the closing brace is
-% removed. (Generally, numeric constants should always be followed by a
-% space to prevent strange expansion errors.)
-\def\supereject{\par\penalty -20000\footnoteno =0 }
-
-% @footnotestyle is meaningful for info output only.
-\let\footnotestyle=\comment
-
-\let\ptexfootnote=\footnote
-
-{\catcode `\@=11
-%
-% Auto-number footnotes.  Otherwise like plain.
-\gdef\footnote{%
-  \global\advance\footnoteno by \@ne
-  \edef\thisfootno{$^{\the\footnoteno}$}%
-  %
-  % In case the footnote comes at the end of a sentence, preserve the
-  % extra spacing after we do the footnote number.
-  \let\@sf\empty
-  \ifhmode\edef\@sf{\spacefactor\the\spacefactor}\/\fi
-  %
-  % Remove inadvertent blank space before typesetting the footnote number.
-  \unskip
-  \thisfootno\@sf
-  \footnotezzz
-}%
-
-% Don't bother with the trickery in plain.tex to not require the
-% footnote text as a parameter.  Our footnotes don't need to be so general.
-%
-% Oh yes, they do; otherwise, @ifset and anything else that uses
-% \parseargline fail inside footnotes because the tokens are fixed when
-% the footnote is read.  --karl, 16nov96.
-%
-\long\gdef\footnotezzz{\insert\footins\bgroup
-  % We want to typeset this text as a normal paragraph, even if the
-  % footnote reference occurs in (for example) a display environment.
-  % So reset some parameters.
-  \interlinepenalty\interfootnotelinepenalty
-  \splittopskip\ht\strutbox % top baseline for broken footnotes
-  \splitmaxdepth\dp\strutbox
-  \floatingpenalty\@MM
-  \leftskip\z@skip
-  \rightskip\z@skip
-  \spaceskip\z@skip
-  \xspaceskip\z@skip
-  \parindent\defaultparindent
-  %
-  % Hang the footnote text off the number.
-  \hang
-  \textindent{\thisfootno}%
-  %
-  % Don't crash into the line above the footnote text.  Since this
-  % expands into a box, it must come within the paragraph, lest it
-  % provide a place where TeX can split the footnote.
-  \footstrut
-  \futurelet\next\fo@t
-}
-\def\fo@t{\ifcat\bgroup\noexpand\next \let\next\f@@t
-  \else\let\next\f@t\fi \next}
-\def\f@@t{\bgroup\aftergroup\@foot\let\next}
-\def\f@t#1{#1\@foot}
-\def\@foot{\strut\egroup}
-
-}%end \catcode `\@=11
-
-% Set the baselineskip to #1, and the lineskip and strut size
-% correspondingly.  There is no deep meaning behind these magic numbers
-% used as factors; they just match (closely enough) what Knuth defined.
-%
-\def\lineskipfactor{.08333}
-\def\strutheightpercent{.70833}
-\def\strutdepthpercent {.29167}
-%
-\def\setleading#1{%
-  \normalbaselineskip = #1\relax
-  \normallineskip = \lineskipfactor\normalbaselineskip
-  \normalbaselines
-  \setbox\strutbox =\hbox{%
-    \vrule width0pt height\strutheightpercent\baselineskip
-                    depth \strutdepthpercent \baselineskip
-  }%
-}
-
-% @| inserts a changebar to the left of the current line.  It should
-% surround any changed text.  This approach does *not* work if the
-% change spans more than two lines of output.  To handle that, we would
-% have adopt a much more difficult approach (putting marks into the main
-% vertical list for the beginning and end of each change).
-%
-\def\|{%
-  % \vadjust can only be used in horizontal mode.
-  \leavevmode
-  %
-  % Append this vertical mode material after the current line in the output.
-  \vadjust{%
-    % We want to insert a rule with the height and depth of the current
-    % leading; that is exactly what \strutbox is supposed to record.
-    \vskip-\baselineskip
-    %
-    % \vadjust-items are inserted at the left edge of the type.  So
-    % the \llap here moves out into the left-hand margin.
-    \llap{%
-      %
-      % For a thicker or thinner bar, change the `1pt'.
-      \vrule height\baselineskip width1pt
-      %
-      % This is the space between the bar and the text.
-      \hskip 12pt
-    }%
-  }%
-}
-
-% For a final copy, take out the rectangles
-% that mark overfull boxes (in case you have decided
-% that the text looks ok even though it passes the margin).
-%
-\def\finalout{\overfullrule=0pt}
-
-% @image.  We use the macros from epsf.tex to support this.
-% If epsf.tex is not installed and @image is used, we complain.
-% 
-% Check for and read epsf.tex up front.  If we read it only at @image
-% time, we might be inside a group, and then its definitions would get
-% undone and the next image would fail.
-\openin 1 = epsf.tex
-\ifeof 1 \else
-  \closein 1
-  % Do not bother showing banner with post-v2.7 epsf.tex (available in
-  % doc/epsf.tex until it shows up on ctan).
-  \def\epsfannounce{\toks0 = }%
-  \input epsf.tex
-\fi
-%
-\newif\ifwarnednoepsf
-\newhelp\noepsfhelp{epsf.tex must be installed for images to
-  work.  It is also included in the Texinfo distribution, or you can get
-  it from ftp://ftp.tug.org/tex/epsf.tex.}
-%
-% Only complain once about lack of epsf.tex.
-\def\image#1{%
-  \ifx\epsfbox\undefined
-    \ifwarnednoepsf \else
-      \errhelp = \noepsfhelp
-      \errmessage{epsf.tex not found, images will be ignored}%
-      \global\warnednoepsftrue
-    \fi
-  \else
-    \imagexxx #1,,,\finish
-  \fi
-}
-%
-% Arguments to @image:
-% #1 is (mandatory) image filename; we tack on .eps extension.
-% #2 is (optional) width, #3 is (optional) height.
-% #4 is just the usual extra ignored arg for parsing this stuff.
-\def\imagexxx#1,#2,#3,#4\finish{%
-  % \epsfbox itself resets \epsf?size at each figure.
-  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}\ifdim\wd0 > 0pt \epsfxsize=#2\relax \fi
-  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #3}\ifdim\wd0 > 0pt \epsfysize=#3\relax \fi
-  % If the image is by itself, center it.
-  \ifvmode
-    \nobreak\medskip
-    \nobreak
-    \centerline{\epsfbox{#1.eps}}%
-    \bigbreak
-  \else
-    \epsfbox{#1.eps}%
-  \fi
-}
-
-
-\message{paper sizes,}
-% And other related parameters.
-
-\newdimen\defaultparindent \defaultparindent = 15pt
-
-\chapheadingskip = 15pt plus 4pt minus 2pt
-\secheadingskip = 12pt plus 3pt minus 2pt
-\subsecheadingskip = 9pt plus 2pt minus 2pt
-
-% Prevent underfull vbox error messages.
-\vbadness = 10000
-
-% Don't be so finicky about underfull hboxes, either.
-\hbadness = 2000
-
-% Following George Bush, just get rid of widows and orphans.
-\widowpenalty=10000
-\clubpenalty=10000
-
-% Use TeX 3.0's \emergencystretch to help line breaking, but if we're
-% using an old version of TeX, don't do anything.  We want the amount of
-% stretch added to depend on the line length, hence the dependence on
-% \hsize.  This makes it come to about 9pt for the 8.5x11 format.  We
-% call this whenever the paper size is set.
-%
-\def\setemergencystretch{%
-  \ifx\emergencystretch\thisisundefined
-    % Allow us to assign to \emergencystretch anyway.
-    \def\emergencystretch{\dimen0}%
-  \else
-    \emergencystretch = \hsize
-    \divide\emergencystretch by 45
-  \fi
-}
-
-% Parameters in order: 1) textheight; 2) textwidth; 3) voffset;
-% 4) hoffset; 5) binding offset; 6) topskip.  Then whoever calls us can
-% set \parskip and call \setleading for \baselineskip.
-%
-\def\internalpagesizes#1#2#3#4#5#6{%
-  \voffset = #3\relax
-  \topskip = #6\relax
-  \splittopskip = \topskip
-  %
-  \vsize = #1\relax
-  \advance\vsize by \topskip
-  \outervsize = \vsize
-  \advance\outervsize by 2\topandbottommargin
-  \pageheight = \vsize
-  %
-  \hsize = #2\relax
-  \outerhsize = \hsize
-  \advance\outerhsize by 0.5in
-  \pagewidth = \hsize
-  %
-  \normaloffset = #4\relax
-  \bindingoffset = #5\relax
-  %
-  \parindent = \defaultparindent
-  \setemergencystretch
-}
-
-% @letterpaper (the default).
-\def\letterpaper{{\globaldefs = 1
-  \parskip = 3pt plus 2pt minus 1pt
-  \setleading{13.2pt}%
-  %
-  % If page is nothing but text, make it come out even.
-  \internalpagesizes{46\baselineskip}{6in}{\voffset}{.25in}{\bindingoffset}{36pt}%
-}}
-
-% Use @smallbook to reset parameters for 7x9.5 (or so) format.
-\def\smallbook{{\globaldefs = 1
-  \parskip = 2pt plus 1pt
-  \setleading{12pt}%
-  %
-  \internalpagesizes{7.5in}{5.in}{\voffset}{.25in}{\bindingoffset}{16pt}%
-  %
-  \lispnarrowing = 0.3in
-  \tolerance = 700
-  \hfuzz = 1pt
-  \contentsrightmargin = 0pt
-  \deftypemargin = 0pt
-  \defbodyindent = .5cm
-  %
-  \let\smalldisplay = \smalldisplayx
-  \let\smallexample = \smalllispx
-  \let\smallformat = \smallformatx
-  \let\smalllisp = \smalllispx
-}}
-
-% Use @afourpaper to print on European A4 paper.
-\def\afourpaper{{\globaldefs = 1
-  \setleading{12pt}%
-  \parskip = 3pt plus 2pt minus 1pt
-  %
-  \internalpagesizes{53\baselineskip}{160mm}{\voffset}{4mm}{\bindingoffset}{44pt}%
-  %
-  \tolerance = 700
-  \hfuzz = 1pt
-}}
-
-% A specific text layout, 24x15cm overall, intended for A4 paper.  Top margin
-% 29mm, hence bottom margin 28mm, nominal side margin 3cm.
-\def\afourlatex{{\globaldefs = 1
-  \setleading{13.6pt}%
-  %
-  \afourpaper
-  \internalpagesizes{237mm}{150mm}{3.6mm}{3.6mm}{3mm}{7mm}%
-  %
-  \globaldefs = 0
-}}
-
-% Use @afourwide to print on European A4 paper in wide format.
-\def\afourwide{%
-  \afourpaper
-  \internalpagesizes{9.5in}{6.5in}{\hoffset}{\normaloffset}{\bindingoffset}{7mm}%
-  %
-  \globaldefs = 0
-}
-
-% @pagesizes TEXTHEIGHT[,TEXTWIDTH]
-% Perhaps we should allow setting the margins, \topskip, \parskip,
-% and/or leading, also. Or perhaps we should compute them somehow.
-% 
-\def\pagesizes{\parsearg\pagesizesxxx}
-\def\pagesizesxxx#1{\pagesizesyyy #1,,\finish}
-\def\pagesizesyyy#1,#2,#3\finish{{%
-  \setbox0 = \hbox{\ignorespaces #2}\ifdim\wd0 > 0pt \hsize=#2\relax \fi
-  \globaldefs = 1
-  %
-  \parskip = 3pt plus 2pt minus 1pt
-  \setleading{13.2pt}%
-  %
-  \internalpagesizes{#1}{\hsize}{\voffset}{\normaloffset}{\bindingoffset}{44pt}%
-}}
-
-% Set default to letter.
-% 
-\letterpaper
-
-\message{and turning on texinfo input format.}
-
-% Define macros to output various characters with catcode for normal text.
-\catcode`\"=\other
-\catcode`\~=\other
-\catcode`\^=\other
-\catcode`\_=\other
-\catcode`\|=\other
-\catcode`\<=\other
-\catcode`\>=\other
-\catcode`\+=\other
-\def\normaldoublequote{"}
-\def\normaltilde{~}
-\def\normalcaret{^}
-\def\normalunderscore{_}
-\def\normalverticalbar{|}
-\def\normalless{<}
-\def\normalgreater{>}
-\def\normalplus{+}
-
-% This macro is used to make a character print one way in ttfont
-% where it can probably just be output, and another way in other fonts,
-% where something hairier probably needs to be done.
-%
-% #1 is what to print if we are indeed using \tt; #2 is what to print
-% otherwise.  Since all the Computer Modern typewriter fonts have zero
-% interword stretch (and shrink), and it is reasonable to expect all
-% typewriter fonts to have this, we can check that font parameter.
-%
-\def\ifusingtt#1#2{\ifdim \fontdimen3\the\font=0pt #1\else #2\fi}
-
-% Turn off all special characters except @
-% (and those which the user can use as if they were ordinary).
-% Most of these we simply print from the \tt font, but for some, we can
-% use math or other variants that look better in normal text.
-
-\catcode`\"=\active
-\def\activedoublequote{{\tt\char34}}
-\let"=\activedoublequote
-\catcode`\~=\active
-\def~{{\tt\char126}}
-\chardef\hat=`\^
-\catcode`\^=\active
-\def^{{\tt \hat}}
-
-\catcode`\_=\active
-\def_{\ifusingtt\normalunderscore\_}
-% Subroutine for the previous macro.
-\def\_{\leavevmode \kern.06em \vbox{\hrule width.3em height.1ex}}
-
-\catcode`\|=\active
-\def|{{\tt\char124}}
-\chardef \less=`\<
-\catcode`\<=\active
-\def<{{\tt \less}}
-\chardef \gtr=`\>
-\catcode`\>=\active
-\def>{{\tt \gtr}}
-\catcode`\+=\active
-\def+{{\tt \char 43}}
-%\catcode 27=\active
-%\def^^[{$\diamondsuit$}
-
-% Set up an active definition for =, but don't enable it most of the time.
-{\catcode`\==\active
-\global\def={{\tt \char 61}}}
-
-\catcode`+=\active
-\catcode`\_=\active
-
-% If a .fmt file is being used, characters that might appear in a file
-% name cannot be active until we have parsed the command line.
-% So turn them off again, and have \everyjob (or @setfilename) turn them on.
-% \otherifyactive is called near the end of this file.
-\def\otherifyactive{\catcode`+=\other \catcode`\_=\other}
-
-\catcode`\@=0
-
-% \rawbackslashxx output one backslash character in current font
-\global\chardef\rawbackslashxx=`\\
-%{\catcode`\\=\other
-%@gdef@rawbackslashxx{\}}
-
-% \rawbackslash redefines \ as input to do \rawbackslashxx.
-{\catcode`\\=\active
-@gdef@rawbackslash{@let\=@rawbackslashxx }}
-
-% \normalbackslash outputs one backslash in fixed width font.
-\def\normalbackslash{{\tt\rawbackslashxx}}
-
-% Say @foo, not \foo, in error messages.
-\escapechar=`\@
-
-% \catcode 17=0   % Define control-q
-\catcode`\\=\active
-
-% Used sometimes to turn off (effectively) the active characters
-% even after parsing them.
-@def@turnoffactive{@let"=@normaldoublequote
-@let\=@realbackslash
-@let~=@normaltilde
-@let^=@normalcaret
-@let_=@normalunderscore
-@let|=@normalverticalbar
-@let<=@normalless
-@let>=@normalgreater
-@let+=@normalplus}
-
-@def@normalturnoffactive{@let"=@normaldoublequote
-@let\=@normalbackslash
-@let~=@normaltilde
-@let^=@normalcaret
-@let_=@normalunderscore
-@let|=@normalverticalbar
-@let<=@normalless
-@let>=@normalgreater
-@let+=@normalplus}
-
-% Make _ and + \other characters, temporarily.
-% This is canceled by @fixbackslash.
-@otherifyactive
-
-% If a .fmt file is being used, we don't want the `\input texinfo' to show up.
-% That is what \eatinput is for; after that, the `\' should revert to printing
-% a backslash.
-%
-@gdef@eatinput input texinfo{@fixbackslash}
-@global@let\ = @eatinput
-
-% On the other hand, perhaps the file did not have a `\input texinfo'. Then
-% the first `\{ in the file would cause an error. This macro tries to fix
-% that, assuming it is called before the first `\' could plausibly occur.
-% Also back turn on active characters that might appear in the input
-% file name, in case not using a pre-dumped format.
-%
-@gdef@fixbackslash{@ifx\@eatinput @let\ = @normalbackslash @fi
-  @catcode`+=@active @catcode`@_=@active}
-
-% These look ok in all fonts, so just make them not special.  The @rm below
-% makes sure that the current font starts out as the newly loaded cmr10
-@catcode`@$=@other @catcode`@%=@other @catcode`@&=@other @catcode`@#=@other
-
-@textfonts
-@rm
-
-@c Local variables:
-@c eval: (add-hook 'write-file-hooks 'time-stamp)
-@c page-delimiter: "^\\\\message"
-@c time-stamp-start: "def\\\\texinfoversion{"
-@c time-stamp-format: "%:y-%02m-%02d"
-@c time-stamp-end: "}"
-@c End:
diff --git a/doc/tinc.conf.5 b/doc/tinc.conf.5
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 42d9cf2..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,196 +0,0 @@
-.TH TINC 5 "May 2000" "tinc version 1.0" "FSF"
-.SH NAME
-tincd.conf \- tinc daemon configuration
-.SH "DESCRIPTION"
-The files in the \fI/etc/tinc\fR directory contain runtime and
-security information for the \fBtinc\fR(8) daemon.
-.PP
-.SH "NETWORKS"
-It is perfectly ok for you to run more than one tinc daemon. However,
-in its default form, you will soon notice that you can't use two
-different configuration files without the \fI-c\fR option.
-
-We have thought of another way of dealing with this: network
-names. This means that you call \fBtincd\fR with the \fI-n\fR argument,
-which will assign a name to this daemon.
-
-The effect of this is that the daemon will set its configuration
-``root'' to \fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/\fR, where \fBnn\fR is your argument
-to the \fI-n\fR option. You'll notice that it appears in syslog as
-``tincd.\fBnn\fR''.
-
-However, it is not strictly necessary that you call tinc with the -n
-option. In this case, the network name would just be empty, and it
-will be used as such. tinc now looks for files in \fI/etc/tinc/\fR,
-instead of \fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/\fR; the configuration file should be
-\fI/etc/tinc/tincd.conf\fR, and the passphrases are now expected to be
-in \fI/etc/tinc/passphrases/\fR.
-
-But it is highly recommended that you use this feature of tinc,
-because it will be so much clearer whom your daemon talks to. Hence,
-we will assume that you use it.
-.PP
-.SH "PASSPHRASES"
-You should use the \fBgenauth\fR(8) program to generate passphrases.
-with, it accepts a single parameter, which is the number of bits the
-passphrase should be. Its output should be stored in
-\fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/passphrases/local\fR \-\- where \fBnn\fR stands
-for the network (See under \fBNETWORKS\fR) above.
-
-Please see the manpage for \fBgenauth\fR to learn more about setting
-up an authentication scheme.
-.PP
-.SH "CONFIGURATION"
-The actual configuration of the daemon is done in the file
-\fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/tincd.conf\fR.
-
-This file consists of comments (lines started with a \fB#\fR) or
-assignments in the form of
-.PP
-.Vb 1
-\&    \fIVariable \fB= \fIValue\fR.
-.Ve
-.PP
-The variable names are case insensitive, and any spaces, tabs,
-newlines and carriage returns are ignored. \fINote\fR: it is not
-required that you put in the \fB=\fR sign, but doing so improves
-readability. If you leave it out, remember to replace it with at least
-one space character.
-.PP
-.SH "VARIABLES"
-.PP
-Here are all valid variables, listed in alphabetical order. The default
-value, required or optional is given between parentheses.
-.TP
-\fBConnectPort\fR = <\fIport\fR> (655)
-Connect to the upstream host (given with the \fBConnectTo\fR directive) on
-port \fIport\fR. port may be given in decimal (default), octal (when preceded
-by a single zero) or hexadecimal (prefixed with 0x). \fIport\fR is the port
-number for both the UDP and the TCP (meta) connections.
-.TP
-\fBConnectTo\fR = <\fIIP address|hostname\fR> (optional)
-Specifies which host to connect to on startup. Multiple \fBConnectTo\fR variables
-may be specified, if connecting to the first one fails then tinc will try
-the next one, and so on. It is possible to specify hostnames for dynamic IP
-addresses (like those given on dyndns.org), tinc will not cache the resolved
-IP address.
-
-If you don't specify a host with \fBConnectTo\fR, regardless of whether a
-value for \fBConnectPort\fR is given, tinc won't connect at all, and will
-instead just listen for incoming connections.
-.TP
-\fBHostnames\fR = <\fIyes|no\fR> (no)
-This option selects whether IP addresses (both real and on the VPN) should
-be resolved. Since DNS lookups are blocking, it might affect tinc's
-efficiency, even stopping the daemon for a few seconds everytime it does
-a lookup if your DNS server is not responding.
-
-This does not affect resolving hostnames to IP addresses from the configuration
-file.
-.TP
-\fBIndirectData\fR = <\fIyes|no\fR> (no)
-This option specifies whether other tinc daemons besides the one you
-specified with \fBConnectTo\fR can make a direct connection to you. This is
-especially useful if you are behind a firewall and it is impossible
-to make a connection from the outside to your tinc daemon. Otherwise,
-it is best to leave this option out or set it to no.
-.TP
-\fBInterface\fR = <\fIdevice\fR> (optional)
-If you have more than one network interface in your computer, tinc will by
-default listen on all of them for incoming connections. It is possible to
-bind tinc to a single interface like eth0 or ppp0 with this variable.
-.TP
-\fBInterfaceIP\fR = <\fIlocal address\fR> (optional)
-If your computer has more than one IP address on a single interface (for example
-if you are running virtual hosts), tinc will by default listen on all of them for
-incoming connections. It is possible to bind tinc to a single IP address with
-this variable. It is still possible to listen on several interfaces at the same
-time though, if they share the same IP address.
-.TP
-\fBKeyExpire\fR = <\fIseconds\fR> (3600)
-This option controls the time the encryption keys used to encrypt the data
-are valid. It is common practice to change keys at regular intervals to
-make it even harder for crackers, even though it is thought to be nearly
-impossible to crack a single key.
-.TP
-\fBListenPort\fR = <\fIport\fR> (655)
-Listen on local port \fIport\fR. The computer connecting to this daemon should
-use this number as the argument for his \fBConnectPort\fR.
-.TP
-\fBMyOwnVPNIP\fR = <\fIlocal address[/maskbits]\fR> (required)
-The \fIlocal address\fR is the number that the daemon will propagate to
-other daemons on the network when it is identifying itself. Hence this
-will be the file name of the passphrase file that the other end expects
-to find the passphrase in.
-
-The local address is the IP address of the tap device, not the real IP
-address of the host running tincd. Due to changes in recent kernels, it
-is also necessary that you make the ethernet (also known as MAC) address
-equal to the IP address (see the example).
-
-\fImaskbits\fR is the number of bits set to 1 in the netmask part.
-.TP
-\fBMyVirtualIP\fR = <\fIlocal address[/maskbits]>
-This is an alias for \fBMyOwnVPNIP\fR.
-.TP
-\fBPassphrases\fR = <\fIdirectory\fR> (/etc/tinc/NETNAME/passphrases)
-The directory where tinc will look for passphrases when someone tries to
-connect. Please see the manpage for genauth(8) for more information
-about passphrases as used by tinc.
-.TP
-\fBPingTimeout\fR = <\fIseconds\fR> (5)
-The number of seconds of inactivity that tinc will wait before sending a
-probe to the other end. If that other end doesn't answer within that
-same amount of seconds, the connection is terminated, and the others
-will be notified of this.
-.TP
-\fBTapDevice\fR = <\fIdevice\fR> (/dev/tap0)
-The ethertap device to use. Note that you can only use one device per
-daemon. The info pages of the tinc package contain more information
-about configuring an ethertap device for Linux.
-.TP
-\fBTCPonly\fR = <\fIyes|no\fR> (no, experimental)
-If this variable is set to yes, then the packets are tunnelled over a TCP
-connection instead of a UDP connection. This is especially useful for those
-who want to run a tinc daemon from behind a masquerading firewall, or if
-UDP packet routing is disabled somehow. This is experimental code,
-try this at your own risk.
-.TP
-\fBVpnMask\fR = <\fImask\fR> (optional)
-The mask that defines the scope of the entire VPN. This option is not used
-by the tinc daemon itself, but can be used by startup scripts to configure
-the ethertap devices correctly.
-.PP
-.SH "FILES"
-.TP
-\fI/etc/tinc/\fR
-The top directory for configuration files.
-.TP
-\fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/tincd.conf\fR
-The default name of the configuration file for net
-\fBnn\fR.
-.TP
-\fI/etc/tinc/\fBnn\fI/passphrases/\fR
-Passphrases are kept in this directory. (See the section
-\fBPASSPHRASES\fR above).
-.PP
-.SH "SEE ALSO"
-\fBtincd\fR(8), \fBgenauth\fR(8)
-.TP
-\fBhttp://tinc.nl.linux.org/\fR
-.PP
-The full documentation for
-.B tinc
-is maintained as a Texinfo manual.  If the
-.B info
-and
-.B tinc
-programs are properly installed at your site, the command
-.IP
-.B info tinc
-.PP
-should give you access to the complete manual.
-.PP
-tinc comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.  This is free software,
-and you are welcome to redistribute it under certain conditions;
-see the file COPYING for details.
diff --git a/doc/tinc.conf.5.in b/doc/tinc.conf.5.in
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..7257bfe
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,399 @@
+.Dd 2002-04-09
+.Dt TINC.CONF 5
+.\" Manual page created by:
+.\" Ivo Timmermans <ivo@o2w.nl>
+.\" Guus Sliepen <guus@sliepen.eu.org>
+.Sh NAME
+.Nm tinc.conf
+.Nd tinc daemon configuration
+.Sh DESCRIPTION
+The files in the
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/
+directory contain runtime and security information for the tinc daemon.
+.Sh NETWORKS
+It is perfectly ok for you to run more than one tinc daemon.
+However, in its default form,
+you will soon notice that you can't use two different configuration files without the
+.Fl c
+option.
+.Pp
+We have thought of another way of dealing with this: network names.
+This means that you call
+.Nm
+with the
+.Fl n
+option, which will assign a name to this daemon.
+.Pp
+The effect of this is that the daemon will set its configuration root to
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa / ,
+where 
+.Ar NETNAME
+is your argument to the
+.Fl n
+option.
+You'll notice that messages appear in syslog as coming from
+.Nm tincd. Ns Ar NETNAME .
+.Pp
+However, it is not strictly necessary that you call tinc with the
+.Fl n
+option.
+In this case, the network name would just be empty,
+and it will be used as such.
+.Nm tinc
+now looks for files in
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ ,
+instead of 
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa / ;
+the configuration file should be
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/tinc.conf ,
+and the host configuration files are now expected to be in
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/hosts/ .
+.Pp
+But it is highly recommended that you use this feature of
+.Nm tinc ,
+because it will be so much clearer whom your daemon talks to.
+Hence, we will assume that you use it.
+.Sh NAMES
+Each tinc daemon should have a name that is unique in the network which it will be part of.
+The name will be used by other tinc daemons for identification.
+The name has to be declared in the
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc.conf
+file.
+.Pp
+To make things easy,
+choose something that will give unique and easy to remember names to your tinc daemon(s).
+You could try things like hostnames, owner surnames or location names.
+.Sh PUBLIC/PRIVATE KEYS
+You should use 
+.Ic tincd -K
+to generate public/private keypairs.
+It will generate two keys.
+The private key should be stored in a separate file
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /rsa_key.priv
+\-\- where 
+.Ar NETNAME
+stands for the network (see 
+.Sx NETWORKS )
+above.
+The public key should be stored in the host configuration file
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /hosts/ Ns Va NAME
+\-\- where
+.Va NAME
+stands for the name of the local tinc daemon (see
+.Sx NAMES ) .
+.Sh SERVER CONFIGURATION
+The server configuration of the daemon is done in the file
+.Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc.conf .
+This file consists of comments (lines started with a
+.Li # )
+or assignments in the form of:
+.Pp
+.Va Variable Li = Ar Value .
+.Pp
+The variable names are case insensitive, and any spaces, tabs,
+newlines and carriage returns are ignored.
+Note: it is not required that you put in the 
+.Li =
+sign, but doing so improves readability.
+If you leave it out, remember to replace it with at least one space character.
+.Pp
+Here are all valid variables, listed in alphabetical order.
+The default value is given between parentheses.
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It Va AddressFamily Li = ipv4 | ipv6 | any Pq any
+This option affects the address family of listening and outgoing sockets.
+If
+.Qq any
+is selected, then depending on the operating system both IPv4 and IPv6 or just
+IPv6 listening sockets will be created.
+.It Va BindToAddress Li = Ar address Bq experimental
+If your computer has more than one IPv4 or IPv6 address,
+.Nm tinc
+will by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.
+It is possible to bind only to a single address with this variable.
+.Pp
+This option may not work on all platforms.
+.It Va BindToInterface Li = Ar interface Bq experimental
+If your computer has more than one network interface,
+.Nm tinc
+will by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.
+It is possible to bind only to a single interface with this variable.
+.Pp
+This option may not work on all platforms.
+.It Va ConnectTo Li = Ar name
+Specifies which other tinc daemon to connect to on startup.
+Multiple
+.Va ConnectTo
+variables may be specified,
+in which case outgoing connections to each specified tinc daemon are made.
+The names should be known to this tinc daemon
+(i.e., there should be a host configuration file for the name on the
+.Va ConnectTo
+line).
+.Pp
+If you don't specify a host with
+.Va ConnectTo ,
+.Nm tinc
+won't try to connect to other daemons at all,
+and will instead just listen for incoming connections.
+.It Va Device Li = Ar device Po Pa /dev/tap0 , Pa /dev/net/tun No or other depending on platform Pc
+The virtual network device to use.
+.Nm tinc
+will automatically detect what kind of device it is.
+Note that you can only use one device per daemon.
+Under Windows, use
+.Va Interface
+instead of
+.Va Device .
+The info pages of the tinc package contain more information
+about configuring the virtual network device.
+.It Va Hostnames Li = yes | no Pq no
+This option selects whether IP addresses (both real and on the VPN) should
+be resolved. Since DNS lookups are blocking, it might affect tinc's
+efficiency, even stopping the daemon for a few seconds every time it does
+a lookup if your DNS server is not responding.
+.Pp
+This does not affect resolving hostnames to IP addresses from the
+host configuration files.
+.It Va Interface Li = Ar interface
+Defines the name of the interface corresponding to the virtual network device.
+Depending on the operating system and the type of device this may or may not actually set the name of the interface.
+Under Windows, this variable is used to select which network interface will be used.
+If you specified a
+.Va Device ,
+this variable is almost always already correctly set.
+.It Va KeyExpire Li = Ar seconds Pq 3600
+This option controls the period the encryption keys used to encrypt the data are valid.
+It is common practice to change keys at regular intervals to make it even harder for crackers,
+even though it is thought to be nearly impossible to crack a single key.
+.It Va MACExpire Li = Ar seconds Pq 600
+This option controls the amount of time MAC addresses are kept before they are removed.
+This only has effect when
+.Va Mode
+is set to
+.Qq switch .
+.It Va MaxTimeout Li = Ar seconds Pq 900
+This is the maximum delay before trying to reconnect to other tinc daemons.
+.It Va Mode Li = router | switch | hub Pq router
+This option selects the way packets are routed to other daemons.
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It router
+In this mode
+.Va Subnet
+variables in the host configuration files will be used to form a routing table.
+Only unicast packets of routable protocols (IPv4 and IPv6) are supported in this mode.
+.Pp
+This is the default mode, and unless you really know you need another mode, don't change it.
+.It switch
+In this mode the MAC addresses of the packets on the VPN will be used to
+dynamically create a routing table just like an Ethernet switch does.
+Unicast, multicast and broadcast packets of every protocol that runs over Ethernet are supported in this mode
+at the cost of frequent broadcast ARP requests and routing table updates.
+.Pp
+This mode is primarily useful if you want to bridge Ethernet segments.
+.It hub
+This mode is almost the same as the switch mode, but instead
+every packet will be broadcast to the other daemons
+while no routing table is managed.
+.El
+.It Va Name Li = Ar name Bq required
+This is the name which identifies this tinc daemon.
+It must be unique for the virtual private network this daemon will connect to.
+.It Va PingTimeout Li = Ar seconds Pq 60
+The number of seconds of inactivity that
+.Nm tinc
+will wait before sending a probe to the other end.
+If that other end doesn't answer within that same amount of time,
+the connection is terminated,
+and the others will be notified of this.
+.It Va PriorityInheritance Li = yes | no Po no Pc Bq experimental
+When this option is enabled the value of the TOS field of tunneled IPv4 packets
+will be inherited by the UDP packets that are sent out.
+.It Va PrivateKey Li = Ar key Bq obsolete
+The private RSA key of this tinc daemon.
+It will allow this tinc daemon to authenticate itself to other daemons.
+.It Va PrivateKeyFile Li = Ar filename Po Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /rsa_key.priv Pc
+The file in which the private RSA key of this tinc daemon resides.
+Note that there must be exactly one of
+.Va PrivateKey
+or
+.Va PrivateKeyFile
+specified in the configuration file.
+.El
+.Sh HOST CONFIGURATION FILES
+The host configuration files contain all information needed
+to establish a connection to those hosts.
+A host configuration file is also required for the local tinc daemon,
+it will use it to read in it's listen port, public key and subnets.
+.Pp
+The idea is that these files are portable.
+You can safely mail your own host configuration file to someone else.
+That other person can then copy it to his own hosts directory,
+and now his tinc daemon will be able to connect to your tinc daemon.
+Since host configuration files only contain public keys,
+no secrets are revealed by sending out this information.
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It Va Address Li = Ar address Bq recommended
+The IP address or hostname of this tinc daemon on the real network.
+This wil only be used when trying to make an outgoing connection to this tinc daemon.
+Multiple
+.Va Address
+variables can be specified, in which case each address will be tried until a working
+connection has been established.
+.It Va Cipher Li = Ar cipher Pq blowfish
+The symmetric cipher algorithm used to encrypt UDP packets.
+Any cipher supported by OpenSSL is recognised.
+Furthermore, specifying
+.Qq none
+will turn off packet encryption.
+.It Va Compression Li = Ar level Pq 0
+This option sets the level of compression used for UDP packets.
+Possible values are 0 (off), 1 (fast zlib) and any integer up to 9 (best zlib),
+10 (fast lzo) and 11 (best lzo).
+.It Va Digest Li = Ar digest Pq sha1
+The digest algorithm used to authenticate UDP packets.
+Any digest supported by OpenSSL is recognised.
+Furthermore, specifying
+.Qq none
+will turn off packet authentication.
+.It Va IndirectData Li = yes | no Pq no
+This option specifies whether other tinc daemons besides the one you specified with
+.Va ConnectTo
+can make a direct connection to you.
+This is especially useful if you are behind a firewall
+and it is impossible to make a connection from the outside to your tinc daemon.
+Otherwise, it is best to leave this option out or set it to no.
+.It Va MACLength Li = Ar length Pq 4
+The length of the message authentication code used to authenticate UDP packets.
+Can be anything from
+.Qq 0
+up to the length of the digest produced by the digest algorithm.
+.It Va Port Li = Ar port Pq 655
+The port number on which this tinc daemon is listening for incoming connections.
+.It Va PublicKey Li = Ar key Bq obsolete
+The public RSA key of this tinc daemon.
+It will be used to cryptographically verify it's identity and to set up a secure connection.
+.It Va PublicKeyFile Li = Ar filename Bq obsolete
+The file in which the public RSA key of this tinc daemon resides.
+.Pp
+From version 1.0pre4 on
+.Nm tinc
+will store the public key directly into the host configuration file in PEM format,
+the above two options then are not necessary.
+Either the PEM format is used, or exactly one of the above two options must be specified
+in each host configuration file,
+if you want to be able to establish a connection with that host.
+.It Va Subnet Li = Ar address Ns Op Li / Ns Ar prefixlength
+The subnet which this tinc daemon will serve.
+.Nm tinc
+tries to look up which other daemon it should send a packet to by searching the appropriate subnet.
+If the packet matches a subnet,
+it will be sent to the daemon who has this subnet in his host configuration file.
+Multiple
+.Va Subnet
+variables can be specified.
+.Pp
+Subnets can either be single MAC, IPv4 or IPv6 addresses,
+in which case a subnet consisting of only that single address is assumed,
+or they can be a IPv4 or IPv6 network address with a prefixlength.
+Shorthand notations are not supported.
+For example, IPv4 subnets must be in a form like 192.168.1.0/24,
+where 192.168.1.0 is the network address and 24 is the number of bits set in the netmask.
+Note that subnets like 192.168.1.1/24 are invalid!
+Read a networking HOWTO/FAQ/guide if you don't understand this.
+IPv6 subnets are notated like fec0:0:0:1:0:0:0:0/64.
+MAC addresses are notated like 0:1a:2b:3c:4d:5e.
+.It Va TCPOnly Li = yes | no Pq no
+If this variable is set to yes,
+then the packets are tunnelled over the TCP connection instead of a UDP connection.
+This is especially useful for those who want to run a tinc daemon
+from behind a masquerading firewall,
+or if UDP packet routing is disabled somehow.
+Setting this options also implicitly sets IndirectData.
+.El
+.Sh SCRIPTS
+Apart from reading the server and host configuration files,
+tinc can also run scripts at certain moments.
+On Windows (not Cygwin), the scripts should have the extension
+.Pa .bat .
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc-up
+This is the most important script.
+If it is present it will be executed right after the tinc daemon has been started and has connected to the virtual network device.
+It should be used to set up the corresponding network interface,
+but can also be used to start other things.
+Under Windows you can use the Network Connections control panel instead of creating this script.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc-down
+This script is started right before the tinc daemon quits.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /hosts/ Ns Ar HOST Ns Pa -up
+This script is started when the tinc daemon with name
+.Ar HOST
+becomes reachable.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /hosts/ Ns Ar HOST Ns Pa -down
+This script is started when the tinc daemon with name
+.Ar HOST
+becomes unreachable.
+.El
+.Pp
+The scripts are started without command line arguments, but can make use of certain environment variables.
+Under UNIX like operating systems the names of environment variables must be preceded by a
+.Li $ 
+in scripts.
+Under Windows, in
+.Pa .bat
+files, they have to be put between
+.Li %
+signs.
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It Ev NETNAME
+If a netname was specified, this environment variable contains it.
+.It Ev NAME
+Contains the name of this tinc daemon.
+.It Ev DEVICE
+Contains the name of the virtual network device that tinc uses.
+.It Ev INTERFACE
+Contains the name of the virtual network interface that tinc uses.
+This should be used for commands like
+.Pa ifconfig .
+.It Ev NODE
+When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its name.
+.It Ev REMOTEADDRESS
+When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its real address.
+.It Ev REMOTEPORT
+When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to the port number it uses for communication with other tinc daemons.
+.El
+.Sh FILES
+The most important files are:
+.Bl -tag -width indent
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/
+The top directory for configuration files.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc.conf
+The default name of the server configuration file for net
+.Ar NETNAME .
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /hosts/
+Host configuration files are kept in this directory.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc-up
+If an executable file with this name exists,
+it will be executed right after the tinc daemon has connected to the virtual network device.
+It can be used to set up the corresponding network interface.
+.It Pa @sysconfdir@/tinc/ Ns Ar NETNAME Ns Pa /tinc-down
+If an executable file with this name exists,
+it will be executed right before the tinc daemon is going to close
+its connection to the virtual network device.
+.El
+.Sh SEE ALSO
+.Xr tincd 8 ,
+.Pa http://tinc.nl.linux.org/ ,
+.Pa http://www.linuxdoc.org/LDP/nag2/ .
+.Pp
+The full documentation for
+.Nm tinc
+is maintained as a Texinfo manual.
+If the info and tinc programs are properly installed at your site, the command
+.Ic info tinc
+should give you access to the complete manual.
+.Pp
+.Nm tinc
+comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
+This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it under certain conditions;
+see the file COPYING for details.
index 50ff661..2132251 100644 (file)
@@ -1,23 +1,26 @@
 \input texinfo   @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@c $Id: tinc.texi,v 1.9 2000/10/18 20:12:06 zarq Exp $
+@c $Id: tinc.texi,v 1.10 2003/08/24 20:38:19 guus Exp $
 @c %**start of header
 @setfilename tinc.info
 @settitle tinc Manual
 @setchapternewpage odd
 @c %**end of header
 
+@include tincinclude.texi
+
 @ifinfo
+@dircategory Networking tools
 @direntry
 * tinc: (tinc).              The tinc Manual.
 @end direntry
 
-This is the info manual for tinc, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
+This is the info manual for @value{PACKAGE} version @value{VERSION}, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
 
-Copyright @copyright{} 1998,199,2000 Ivo Timmermans
-<itimmermans@@bigfoot.com>, Guus Sliepen <guus@@sliepen.warande.net> and
+Copyright @copyright{} 1998-2003 Ivo Timmermans
+<ivo@@o2w.nl>, Guus Sliepen <guus@@sliepen.eu.org> and
 Wessel Dankers <wsl@@nl.linux.org>.
 
-$Id: tinc.texi,v 1.9 2000/10/18 20:12:06 zarq Exp $
+$Id: tinc.texi,v 1.10 2003/08/24 20:38:19 guus Exp $
 
 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this
 manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are
@@ -38,11 +41,13 @@ permission notice identical to this one.
 @page
 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
 @cindex copyright
-Copyright @copyright{} 1998,1999,2000 Ivo Timmermans
-<itimmermans@@bigfoot.com>, Guus Sliepen <guus@@sliepen.warande.net> and
+This is the info manual for @value{PACKAGE} version @value{VERSION}, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
+
+Copyright @copyright{} 1998-2003 Ivo Timmermans
+<ivo@@o2w.nl>, Guus Sliepen <guus@@sliepen.eu.org> and
 Wessel Dankers <wsl@@nl.linux.org>.
 
-$Id: tinc.texi,v 1.9 2000/10/18 20:12:06 zarq Exp $
+$Id: tinc.texi,v 1.10 2003/08/24 20:38:19 guus Exp $
 
 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this
 manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are
@@ -59,13 +64,13 @@ permission notice identical to this one.
 @node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
 
 @menu
-* Introduction::                Introduction
-* Installing tinc - preparations::  
-* Installing tinc - installation::  
-* Configuring tinc::            
-* Running tinc::                
-* Technical information::       
-* About us::                    
+* Introduction::
+* Preparations::
+* Installation::
+* Configuration::
+* Running tinc::
+* Technical information::
+* About us::
 * Concept Index::               All used terms explained
 @end menu
 
@@ -73,7 +78,7 @@ permission notice identical to this one.
 @contents
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Introduction, Installing tinc - preparations, Top, Top
+@node    Introduction, Preparations, Top, Top
 @chapter Introduction
 
 @cindex tinc
@@ -83,74 +88,67 @@ Internet.
 
 Because the tunnel appears to the IP level network code as a normal
 network device, there is no need to adapt any existing software.
-
-This tunneling allows VPN sites to share information with each other
+The encrypted tunnels allows VPN sites to share information with each other
 over the Internet without exposing any information to others.
 
-This document is the manual for tinc. Included are chapters on how to
+This document is the manual for tinc.  Included are chapters on how to
 configure your computer to use tinc, as well as the configuration
 process of tinc itself.
 
 @menu
-* VPNs::                        Virtual Private Networks in general
-* tinc::                        about tinc
-* Supported platforms::         
+* Virtual Private Networks::
+* tinc::                        About tinc
+* Supported platforms::
 @end menu
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    VPNs, tinc, Introduction, Introduction
+@node    Virtual Private Networks, tinc, Introduction, Introduction
 @section Virtual Private Networks
 
 @cindex VPN
 A Virtual Private Network or VPN is a network that can only be accessed
-by a few elected computers that participate. This goal is achievable in
+by a few elected computers that participate.  This goal is achievable in
 more than just one way.
 
 @cindex private
-Private networks can consist of a single stand-alone ethernet LAN. Or
-even two computers hooked up using a null-modem cable. In these cases,
+Private networks can consist of a single stand-alone Ethernet LAN.  Or
+even two computers hooked up using a null-modem cable.  In these cases,
 it is
 obvious that the network is @emph{private}, no one can access it from the
-outside. But if your computers are linked to the internet, the network
+outside.  But if your computers are linked to the Internet, the network
 is not private anymore, unless one uses firewalls to block all private
-traffic. But then, there is no way to send private data to trusted
-computers on the other end of the internet.
+traffic.  But then, there is no way to send private data to trusted
+computers on the other end of the Internet.
 
 @cindex virtual
-This problem can be solved by using @emph{virtual} networks. Virtual
-networks can live on top of other networks, but do not interfere with
-each other. Mostly, virtual networks appear like a singe LAN, even though
-they can span the entire world. But virtual networks can't be secured
+This problem can be solved by using @emph{virtual} networks.  Virtual
+networks can live on top of other networks, but they use encapsulation to
+keep using their private address space so they do not interfere with
+the Internet.  Mostly, virtual networks appear like a singe LAN, even though
+they can span the entire world.  But virtual networks can't be secured
 by using firewalls, because the traffic that flows through it has to go
-through the internet, where other people can look at it.
+through the Internet, where other people can look at it.
 
-When one introduces encryption, we can form a true VPN. Other people may
+As is the case with either type of VPN, anybody could eavesdrop.  Or
+worse, alter data.  Hence it's probably advisable to encrypt the data
+that flows over the network.
+
+When one introduces encryption, we can form a true VPN.  Other people may
 see encrypted traffic, but if they don't know how to decipher it (they
 need to know the key for that), they cannot read the information that flows
-through the VPN. This is what tinc was made for.
-
-@cindex virtual
-tinc uses normal IP datagrams to encapsulate data that goes over the VPN
-network link. In this case it's also clear that the network is
-@emph{virtual}, because no direct network link has to exist between to
-participants.
-
-As is the case with either type of VPN, anybody could eavesdrop. Or
-worse, alter data. Hence it's probably advisable to encrypt the data
-that flows over the network.
+through the VPN.  This is what tinc was made for.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    tinc, Supported platforms, VPNs, Introduction
+@node    tinc, Supported platforms, Virtual Private Networks, Introduction
 @section tinc
 
 @cindex vpnd
-@cindex ethertap
 I really don't quite remember what got us started, but it must have been
-Guus' idea. He wrote a simple implementation (about 50 lines of C) that
-used the @emph{ethertap} device that Linux knows of since somewhere
-about kernel 2.1.60. It didn't work immediately and he improved it a
-bit. At this stage, the project was still simply called @samp{vpnd}.
+Guus' idea.  He wrote a simple implementation (about 50 lines of C) that
+used the ethertap device that Linux knows of since somewhere
+about kernel 2.1.60.  It didn't work immediately and he improved it a
+bit.  At this stage, the project was still simply called @samp{vpnd}.
 
 Since then, a lot has changed---to say the least.
 
@@ -160,12 +158,21 @@ both the receiving and sending end, it has become largely
 runtime-configurable---in short, it has become a full-fledged
 professional package.
 
-A lot can---and will be---changed. I have a few things that I'd like to
-see in the future releases of tinc. Not everything will be available in
-the near future. Our first objective is to make tinc work perfectly as
+@cindex Traditional VPNs
+@cindex scalability
+tinc also allows more than two sites to connect to eachother and form a single VPN.
+Traditionally VPNs are created by making tunnels, which only have two endpoints.
+Larger VPNs with more sites are created by adding more tunnels.
+tinc takes another approach: only endpoints are specified,
+the software itself will take care of creating the tunnels.
+This allows for easier configuration and improved scalability.
+
+A lot can---and will be---changed. We have a number of things that we would like to
+see in the future releases of tinc.  Not everything will be available in
+the near future.  Our first objective is to make tinc work perfectly as
 it stands, and then add more advanced features.
 
-Meanwhile, we're always open-minded towards new ideas. And we're
+Meanwhile, we're always open-minded towards new ideas.  And we're
 available too.
 
 
@@ -173,44 +180,95 @@ available too.
 @node    Supported platforms,  , tinc, Introduction
 @section Supported platforms
 
-tinc works on Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris.  These are the three platforms
-that are supported by the universial TUN/TAP device driver, so if
-support for other operating systems is added to this driver, perhaps
-tinc will run on them as well.  Without this driver, tinc will most
+@cindex platforms
+tinc has been verified to work under Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, MacOS/X (Darwin), Solaris, and Windows (both natively and in a Cygwin environment),
+with various hardware architectures.  These are some of the platforms
+that are supported by the universal tun/tap device driver or other virtual network device drivers.
+Without such a driver, tinc will most
 likely compile and run, but it will not be able to send or receive data
 packets.
 
+@cindex release
+For an up to date list of supported platforms, please check the list on
+our website:
+@uref{http://tinc.nl.linux.org/platforms}.
+
+
 @c ==================================================================
 @subsection Linux
 
+@cindex Linux
 tinc was first written for Linux running on an intel x86 processor, so
 this is the best supported platform.  The protocol however, and actually
 anything about tinc, has been rewritten to support random byte ordering
 and arbitrary word length.  So in theory it should run on other
-processors that Linux runs on.  Take care however, we haven't been able
-to really test it yet.  If you want to run tinc on another platform than
-x86, and want to tell us how it went, please do so.
+processors that Linux runs on.  It has already been verified to run on
+alpha and sparc processors as well.
 
-tinc uses the ethertap device that is provided in the standard kernel
-since version 2.1.60, so anything above that (2.2.x, 2.3.x, and the
-2.4.0-testx (which is current at the time of this writing) kernel
-versions) is able to support tinc.
+tinc uses the ethertap device or the universal tun/tap driver. The former is provided in the standard kernel
+from version 2.1.60 up to 2.3.x, but has been replaced in favour of the tun/tap driver in kernel versions 2.4.0 and later.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
 @subsection FreeBSD
 
-tinc on FreeBSD relies on the universial TUN/TAP driver for its data
-acquisition from the kernel.  Therefore, tinc suports the same platforms
+@cindex FreeBSD
+tinc on FreeBSD relies on the universal tun/tap driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel.  Therefore, tinc will work on the same platforms
 as this driver.  These are: FreeBSD 3.x, 4.x, 5.x.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
+@subsection OpenBSD
+
+@cindex OpenBSD
+tinc on OpenBSD relies on the tun driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel. It has been verified to work under at least OpenBSD 2.9.
+
+Tunneling IPv6 packets may not work on OpenBSD.
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@subsection Solaris
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@subsection NetBSD
+
+@cindex NetBSD
+tinc on NetBSD relies on the tun driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel. It has been verified to work under at least NetBSD 1.5.2.
+
+Tunneling IPv6 does not work on OpenBSD.
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
 @subsection Solaris
 
-tinc on Solaris relies on the universial TUN/TAP driver for its data
-acquisition from the kernel.  Therefore, tinc suports the same platforms
-as this driver.  These are: Solaris, 2.1.x.
+@cindex Solaris
+tinc on Solaris relies on the universal tun/tap driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel.  Therefore, tinc will work on the same platforms
+as this driver.  These are: Solaris 8 (SunOS 5.8).
+
+IPv6 packets cannot be tunneled on Solaris.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@subsection Darwin (MacOS/X)
+
+@cindex Darwin
+@cindex MacOS/X
+tinc on Darwin relies on the tunnel driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel. This driver is not part of Darwin but can be
+downloaded from @uref{http://chrisp.de/en/projects/tunnel.html}.
+
+IPv6 packets cannot be tunneled on Darwin.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@subsection Windows
+
+@cindex Windows
+tinc on Windows, in a Cygwin environment, relies on the CIPE driver or the TAP-Win32 driver for its data
+acquisition from the kernel. This driver is not part of Windows but can be
+downloaded from @uref{http://cipe-win32.sourceforge.net/}.
 
 
 @c
@@ -227,150 +285,204 @@ as this driver.  These are: Solaris, 2.1.x.
 @c
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Installing tinc - preparations, Installing tinc - installation, Introduction, Top
-@chapter Installing tinc: preparations
+@node    Preparations, Installation, Introduction, Top
+@chapter Preparations
 
 This chapter contains information on how to prepare your system to
 support tinc.
 
 @menu
-* Configuring the kernel::      
-* Libraries::                   
+* Configuring the kernel::
+* Libraries::
 @end menu
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Configuring the kernel, Libraries, Installing tinc - preparations, Installing tinc - preparations
+@node    Configuring the kernel, Libraries, Preparations, Preparations
 @section Configuring the kernel
 
-If you are running Linux, chances are good that your kernel already
-supports all the devices that tinc needs for proper operation.  For
-example, the standard kernel from Redhat Linux already has support for
-ethertap and netlink compiled in.  Debian users can use the modconf
-utility to select the modules.  If your Linux distribution supports this
-method of selecting devices, look out for something called `ethertap',
-and `netlink_dev'.  You need both these devices.
-
-If you can install these devices in a similar manner, you may skip this
-section.
+@cindex RedHat
+@cindex Debian
+@cindex netlink_dev
+@cindex tun
+@cindex ethertap
+If you are running Linux, chances are good that your kernel already supports
+all the devices that tinc needs for proper operation.  For example, the
+standard kernel from Redhat Linux already has support for ethertap and netlink
+compiled in.  Debian users can use the modconf utility to select the modules.
+If your Linux distribution supports this method of selecting devices, look out
+for something called `ethertap', and `netlink_dev' if it is using a kernel
+version prior to 2.4.0. In that case you will need both these devices.  If you
+are using kernel 2.4.0 or later, you need to select `tun'.
+
+@cindex Kernel-HOWTO
+If you can install these devices in a similar manner, you may skip this section.
+Otherwise, you will have to recompile the kernel in order to turn on the required features.
+If you are unfamiliar with the process of configuring and compiling a new kernel,
+you should read the @uref{http://howto.linuxberg.com/LDP/HOWTO/Kernel-HOWTO.html, Kernel HOWTO} first.
 
 @menu
-* Configuration of the Linux kernel::  
-* Configuration of the FreeBSD kernel::  
-* Configuration of the Solaris kernel::  
+* Configuration of Linux kernels 2.1.60 up to 2.4.0::
+* Configuration of Linux kernels 2.4.0 and higher::
+* Configuration of FreeBSD kernels::
+* Configuration of OpenBSD kernels::
+* Configuration of NetBSD kernels::
+* Configuration of Solaris kernels::
+* Configuration of Darwin (MacOS/X) kernels::
+* Configuration of Windows::
 @end menu
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node       Configuration of the Linux kernel, Configuration of the FreeBSD kernel, Configuring the kernel, Configuring the kernel
-@subsection Configuring the Linux kernel
-
-Since this particular implementation only runs on 2.1 or higher Linux
-kernels, you should grab one (2.2 is current at this time). A 2.0 port
-is not really possible, unless someone tells me someone ported the
-ethertap and netlink devices back to 2.0.
-
-If you are unfamiliar with the process of configuring and compiling a
-new kernel, you should read the
-@uref{http://howto.linuxberg.com/LDP/HOWTO/Kernel-HOWTO.html, Kernel
-HOWTO} first. Do that now!
+@node       Configuration of Linux kernels 2.1.60 up to 2.4.0, Configuration of Linux kernels 2.4.0 and higher, Configuring the kernel, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of Linux kernels 2.1.60 up to 2.4.0
 
-Here are the options you have to turn on when configuring a new
-kernel.
-
-For kernel 2.2.x:
+Here are the options you have to turn on when configuring a new kernel:
 
 @example
 Code maturity level options
 [*] Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
 Networking options
 [*] Kernel/User netlink socket
-<*> Netlink device emulation
+<M> Netlink device emulation
 Network device support
-<*> Ethertap network tap
+<M> Ethertap network tap
 @end example
 
-For kernel 2.3.x and 2.4.x:
+If you want to run more than one instance of tinc or other programs that use
+the ethertap, you have to compile the ethertap driver as a module, otherwise
+you can also choose to compile it directly into the kernel.
+
+If you decide to build any of these as dynamic kernel modules, it's a good idea
+to add these lines to @file{/etc/modules.conf}:
+
+@example
+alias char-major-36 netlink_dev
+alias tap0 ethertap
+options tap0 -o tap0 unit=0
+alias tap1 ethertap
+options tap1 -o tap1 unit=1
+...
+alias tap@emph{N} ethertap
+options tap@emph{N} -o tap@emph{N} unit=@emph{N}
+@end example
+
+Add as much alias/options lines as necessary.
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Configuration of Linux kernels 2.4.0 and higher, Configuration of FreeBSD kernels, Configuration of Linux kernels 2.1.60 up to 2.4.0, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of Linux kernels 2.4.0 and higher
+
+Here are the options you have to turn on when configuring a new kernel:
 
 @example
 Code maturity level options
 [*] Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
-Networking options
-[*] Kernel/User netlink socket
-<*> Netlink device emulation
 Network device support
-<*> Universal TUN/TAP device driver support
+<M> Universal tun/tap device driver support
 @end example
 
+It's not necessary to compile this driver as a module, even if you are going to
+run more than one instance of tinc.
 
-Any other options not mentioned here are not relevant to tinc. If you
-decide to build any of these as dynamic kernel modules, it's a good idea
-to add these lines to @file{/etc/modules.conf}.
+If you have an early 2.4 kernel, you can choose both the tun/tap driver and the
+`Ethertap network tap' device.  This latter is marked obsolete, and chances are
+that it won't even function correctly anymore.  Make sure you select the
+universal tun/tap driver.
+
+If you decide to build the tun/tap driver as a kernel module, add these lines
+to @file{/etc/modules.conf}:
 
 @example
-alias tap0 ethertap
-alias char-major-36 netlink_dev
+alias char-major-10-200 tun
 @end example
 
-If you have a 2.4 kernel, you can also choose to use the `Ethertap
-network tap' device.  This is marked obsolete, because the universal
-TUN/TAP driver is a newer implementation that is supposed to be used in
-favor of ethertap.  For tinc, it doesn't really matter which one you
-choose; based on the device file name, tinc will make the right choice
-about what protocol to use.
 
-Finally, after having set up other options, build the kernel and boot
-it.  Unfortunately it's not possible to insert these modules in a
-running kernel.
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Configuration of FreeBSD kernels, Configuration of OpenBSD kernels, Configuration of Linux kernels 2.4.0 and higher, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of FreeBSD kernels
+
+For FreeBSD version 4.1 and higher, the tap driver is included in the default kernel configuration, for earlier
+systems (4.0 and earlier), you need to install the universal tun/tap driver
+yourself.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node       Configuration of the FreeBSD kernel, Configuration of the Solaris kernel, Configuration of the Linux kernel, Configuring the kernel
-@subsection Configuring the FreeBSD kernel
+@node       Configuration of OpenBSD kernels, Configuration of NetBSD kernels, Configuration of FreeBSD kernels, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of OpenBSD kernels
 
-This section will contain information on how to configure your FreeBSD
-kernel to support the universal TUN/TAP device.  For 5.0 and 4.1
-systems, this is included in the kernel configuration, for earlier
-systems (4.0 and 3.x), you need to install the universal TUN/TAP driver
-yourself.
+For OpenBSD version 2.9 and higher,
+the tun driver is included in the default kernel configuration.
 
-Unfortunately somebody still has to write the text.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Configuration of NetBSD kernels, Configuration of Solaris kernels, Configuration of OpenBSD kernels, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of NetBSD kernels
+
+For NetBSD version 1.5.2 and higher,
+the tun driver is included in the default kernel configuration.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node       Configuration of the Solaris kernel,  , Configuration of the FreeBSD kernel, Configuring the kernel
-@subsection Configuring the Solaris kernel
+@node       Configuration of Solaris kernels, Configuration of Darwin (MacOS/X) kernels, Configuration of NetBSD kernels, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of Solaris kernels
 
-This section will contain information on how to configure your Solaris
-kernel to support the universal TUN/TAP device.  You need to install
-this driver yourself.
+For Solaris 8 (SunOS 5.8) and higher,
+the tun driver is included in the default kernel configuration.
 
-Unfortunately somebody still has to write the text.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Configuration of Darwin (MacOS/X) kernels, Configuration of Windows, Configuration of Solaris kernels, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of Darwin (MacOS/X) kernels
+
+Darwin does not come with a tunnel driver. You must download it at
+@uref{http://chrisp.de/en/projects/tunnel.html}. If compiling the source fails,
+try the binary module. The tunnel driver must be loaded before starting tinc
+with the following command:
+
+@example
+kmodload tunnel
+@end example
+
+Once loaded, the tunnel driver will automatically create @file{/dev/tun0}..@file{/dev/tun3}
+and the corresponding network interfaces.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Libraries,  , Configuring the kernel, Installing tinc - preparations
+@node       Configuration of Windows,  , Configuration of Darwin (MacOS/X) kernels, Configuring the kernel
+@subsection Configuration of Windows
+
+You will need to install the CIPE driver or the TAP-Win32 driver. You can download the CIPE driver from
+@uref{http://cipe-win32.sourceforge.net}.  Using the Network Connections control panel,
+configure the CIPE network device in the same way as you would do from the tinc-up script
+as explained in the rest of the documentation.
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node    Libraries,  , Configuring the kernel, Preparations
 @section Libraries
 
 @cindex requirements
-Before you can configure or build tinc, you need to have the OpenSSL
-library installed on your system.  If you try to configure tinc without
-having installed it, configure will give you an error message, and stop.
+@cindex libraries
+Before you can configure or build tinc, you need to have the OpenSSL,
+zlib and lzo libraries installed on your system.  If you try to configure tinc without
+having them installed, configure will give you an error message, and stop.
 
 @menu
-* OpenSSL::                     
+* OpenSSL::
+* zlib::
+* lzo::
 @end menu
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node       OpenSSL,  , Libraries, Libraries
+@node       OpenSSL, zlib, Libraries, Libraries
 @subsection OpenSSL
 
 @cindex OpenSSL
 For all cryptography-related functions, tinc uses the functions provided
-by the OpenSSL library.  We recommend using version 0.9.5 or 0.9.6 of
-this library.  Other versions may also work, but we can guarantee
-nothing.
+by the OpenSSL library.
 
 If this library is not installed, you wil get an error when configuring
 tinc for build.  Support for running tinc without having OpenSSL
@@ -386,6 +498,79 @@ build and install this package are included within the package.  Please
 make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
 default).
 
+If you installed the OpenSSL libraries from source, it may be necessary
+to let configure know where they are, by passing configure one of the
+--with-openssl-* parameters.
+
+@example
+--with-openssl=DIR      OpenSSL library and headers prefix
+--with-openssl-include=DIR OpenSSL headers directory
+                        (Default is OPENSSL_DIR/include)
+--with-openssl-lib=DIR  OpenSSL library directory
+                        (Default is OPENSSL_DIR/lib)
+@end example
+
+
+@subsubheading License
+
+@cindex license
+Since the license under which OpenSSL is distributed is not directly
+compatible with the terms of the GNU GPL
+@uref{http://www.openssl.org/support/faq.html#LEGAL2}, therefore we
+include an addition to the GPL (see also the file COPYING.README):
+
+@quotation
+This program is released under the GPL with the additional exemption
+that compiling, linking, and/or using OpenSSL is allowed.  You may
+provide binary packages linked to the OpenSSL libraries, provided that
+all other requirements of the GPL are met.
+@end quotation
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       zlib, lzo, OpenSSL, Libraries
+@subsection zlib
+
+@cindex zlib
+For the optional compression of UDP packets, tinc uses the functions provided
+by the zlib library.
+
+If this library is not installed, you wil get an error when configuring
+tinc for build.  Support for running tinc without having zlib
+installed @emph{may} be added in the future.
+
+You can use your operating system's package manager to install this if
+available.  Make sure you install the development AND runtime versions
+of this package.
+
+If you have to install zlib manually, you can get the source code
+from @url{http://www.gzip.org/zlib/}.  Instructions on how to configure,
+build and install this package are included within the package.  Please
+make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
+default).
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       lzo,  , zlib, Libraries
+@subsection lzo
+
+@cindex lzo
+Another form of compression is offered using the lzo library.
+
+If this library is not installed, you wil get an error when configuring
+tinc for build.  Support for running tinc without having lzo
+installed @emph{may} be added in the future.
+
+You can use your operating system's package manager to install this if
+available.  Make sure you install the development AND runtime versions
+of this package.
+
+If you have to install lzo manually, you can get the source code
+from @url{http://www.oberhumer.com/opensource/lzo/}.  Instructions on how to configure,
+build and install this package are included within the package.  Please
+make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
+default).
+
 
 @c
 @c
@@ -397,51 +582,96 @@ default).
 @c
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Installing tinc - installation, Configuring tinc, Installing tinc - preparations, Top
-@chapter Installing tinc: installation
+@node    Installation, Configuration, Preparations, Top
+@chapter Installation
 
-If you use Redhat or Debian, you may want to install one of the
+If you use Debian, you may want to install one of the
 precompiled packages for your system.  These packages are equipped with
 system startup scripts and sample configurations.
 
-If you don't run either of these systems, or you want to compile tinc
+If you cannot use one of the precompiled packages, or you want to compile tinc
 for yourself, you can use the source.  The source is distributed under
 the GNU General Public License (GPL).  Download the source from the
-@uref{http://tinc.nl.linux.org/download.html, download page}, which has
+@uref{http://tinc.nl.linux.org/download, download page}, which has
 the checksums of these files listed; you may wish to check these with
 md5sum before continuing.
 
-tinc comes in a handy autoconf/automake package, which you can just
-treat the same as any other package. Which is just untar it, type
-`configure' and then `make'.
-
+tinc comes in a convenient autoconf/automake package, which you can just
+treat the same as any other package.  Which is just untar it, type
+`./configure' and then `make'.
 More detailed instructions are in the file @file{INSTALL}, which is
 included in the source distribution.
 
 @menu
-* Building tinc::               
-* System files::                
-* Interfaces::                  
+* Building and installing tinc::
+* System files::
 @end menu
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Building tinc, System files, Installing tinc - installation, Installing tinc - installation
-@section Building tinc
+@node    Building and installing tinc, System files, Installation, Installation
+@section Building and installing tinc
+
+Detailed instructions on configuring the source, building tinc and installing tinc
+can be found in the file called @file{INSTALL}.
+
+@cindex binary package
+If you happen to have a binary package for tinc for your distribution,
+you can use the package management tools of that distribution to install tinc.
+The documentation that comes along with your distribution will tell you how to do that.
 
-Detailed instructions on configuring the source and building tinc can be
-found in the file called @file{INSTALL}.
+@menu
+* Darwin (MacOS/X) build environment::
+* Cygwin (Windows) build environment::
+* MinGW (Windows) build environment::
+@end menu
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    System files, Interfaces, Building tinc, Installing tinc - installation
+@node       Darwin (MacOS/X) build environment, Cygwin (Windows) build environment, Building and installing tinc, Building and installing tinc
+@subsection Darwin (MacOS/X) build environment
+
+In order to build tinc on Darwin, you need to install the MacOS/X Developer Tools
+from @uref{http://developer.apple.com/tools/macosxtools.html} and
+a recent version of Fink from @uref{http://fink.sourceforge.net/}.
+
+After installation use fink to download and install the following packages:
+autoconf25, automake, dlcompat, m4, openssl, zlib and lzo.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Cygwin (Windows) build environment, MinGW (Windows) build environment, Darwin (MacOS/X) build environment, Building and installing tinc
+@subsection Cygwin (Windows) build environment
+
+If Cygwin hasn't already been installed, install it directly from
+@uref{http://www.cygwin.com/}.
+
+When tinc is compiled in a Cygwin environment, it can only be run in this environment,
+but all programs, including those started outside the Cygwin environment, will be able to use the VPN.
+It will also support all features.
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       MinGW (Windows) build environment,  , Cygwin (Windows) build environment, Building and installing tinc
+@subsection MinGW (Windows) build environment
+
+You will need to install the MinGW environment from @uref{http://www.mingw.org}.
+
+When tinc is compiled using MinGW it runs natively under Windows,
+it is not necessary to keep MinGW installed.
+
+When detaching, tinc will install itself as a service,
+which will be restarted automatically after reboots.
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node    System files,  , Building and installing tinc, Installation
 @section System files
 
-Before you can run tinc, you 
+Before you can run tinc, you must make sure you have all the needed
+files on your system.
 
 @menu
-* Device files::                
-* Other files::                 
+* Device files::
+* Other files::
 @end menu
 
 
@@ -449,6 +679,7 @@ Before you can run tinc, you
 @node       Device files, Other files, System files, System files
 @subsection Device files
 
+@cindex device files
 First, you'll need the special device file(s) that form the interface
 between the kernel and the daemon.
 
@@ -457,29 +688,31 @@ may read/write to this file.  You'd want this, because otherwise
 eavesdropping would become a bit too easy.  This does, however, imply
 that you'd have to run tincd as root.
 
-If you use the universal TUN/TAP driver, you have to create the
-following device files (unless they already exist):
+If you use Linux and have a kernel version prior to 2.4.0, you have to make the
+ethertap devices:
 
 @example
-mknod -m 600 /dev/... c .. ..
-chown 0.0 /dev/...
+mknod -m 600 /dev/tap0 c 36 16
+mknod -m 600 /dev/tap1 c 36 17
+...
+mknod -m 600 /dev/tap@emph{N} c 36 @emph{N+16}
 @end example
 
-If you want to have more devices, the device numbers will be .. .. ...
-
-If you use Linux, and you run the new 2.4 kernel using the devfs
-filesystem, then the tap device will be automatically generated as
-@file{/dev/netlink/tap0}.
+There is a maximum of 16 ethertap devices.
 
-If you use Linux and have kernel 2.2.x, you have to make the ethertap
-devices:
+If you use the universal tun/tap driver, you have to create the
+following device file (unless it already exist):
 
 @example
-mknod -m 600 /dev/tap0 c 36 16
-chown 0.0 /dev/tap0
+mknod -m 600 /dev/tun c 10 200
 @end example
 
-Any further ethertap devices have minor device number 16 through 31.
+If you use Linux, and you run the new 2.4 kernel using the devfs filesystem,
+then the tun/tap device will probably be automatically generated as
+@file{/dev/net/tun}.
+
+Unlike the ethertap device, you do not need multiple device files if
+you are planning to run multiple tinc daemons.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
@@ -489,85 +722,26 @@ Any further ethertap devices have minor device number 16 through 31.
 @subsubheading @file{/etc/networks}
 
 You may add a line to @file{/etc/networks} so that your VPN will get a
-symbolic name. For example:
+symbolic name.  For example:
 
 @example
 myvpn 10.0.0.0
 @end example
 
-This has nothing to do with the MyVPNIP configuration variable that will be
-discussed later, it is only to make the output of the route command more
-legible.
-
 @subsubheading @file{/etc/services}
 
-You may add this line to @file{/etc/services}. The effect is that you
-may supply a @samp{tinc} as a valid port number to some programs. The
+@cindex port numbers
+You may add this line to @file{/etc/services}.  The effect is that you
+may supply a @samp{tinc} as a valid port number to some programs.  The
 number 655 is registered with the IANA.
 
 @example
 tinc            655/tcp    TINC
 tinc            655/udp    TINC
-#                          Ivo Timmermans <itimmermans@@bigfoot.com>
+#                          Ivo Timmermans <ivo@@o2w.nl>
 @end example
 
 
-@c ==================================================================
-@node    Interfaces,  , System files, Installing tinc - installation
-@section Interfaces
-
-Before you can start transmitting data over the tinc tunnel, you must
-set up the ethertap network devices.
-
-First, decide which IP addresses you want to have associated with these
-devices, and what network mask they must have.  You also need these
-numbers when you are going to configure tinc itself.  @xref{Configuring
-tinc}.
-
-It doesn't matter much which part you do first, setting up the network
-devices or configure tinc. But they both have to be done before you try
-to start a tincd.
-
-The actual setup of the ethertap device is quite simple, just repeat
-after me:
-
-@example
-ifconfig tap@emph{n} hw ether fe:fd:@emph{xx}:@emph{xx}:@emph{xx}:@emph{xx}
-@end example
-
-The @emph{n} here is the number of the ethertap device you want to use.
-It should be the same @emph{n} as the one you use for
-@file{/dev/tap@emph{n}}.  The @emph{xx}s are four hexadecimal numbers
-(0--ff). With previous versions of tincd, it didn't matter what they
-were.  But newer kernels require properly set up ethernet addresses.  In
-fact, the old behavior was wrong.  It is required that the @emph{xx}s
-match the numbers of the IP address you will give to the tap device and
-to the MyOwnVPNIP configuration (which will be discussed later).
-
-@cindex MAC address
-@cindex hardware address
-@strong{Tip}: for finding out what the MAC address of the tap interface
-should be, you can use the following command:
-
-@example
-$ printf 'fe:fd:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x' 10 1 54 1
-fe:fd:0a:01:36:01
-@end example
-
-@cindex ifconfig
-To activate the device, you have to assign an IP address to it.  To set
-an IP address @emph{IP} with network mask @emph{mask}, do the following:
-
-@example
-ifconfig tap@emph{n} @emph{xx}.@emph{xx}.@emph{xx}.@emph{xx} netmask @emph{mask}
-@end example
-
-@cindex netmask
-The netmask is the mask of the @emph{entire} VPN network, not just your
-own subnet.  It is the same netmask you will have to specify with the
-VpnMask configuration variable.
-
-
 @c
 @c
 @c
@@ -580,64 +754,113 @@ VpnMask configuration variable.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Configuring tinc, Running tinc, Installing tinc - installation, Top
-@chapter Configuring tinc
+@node    Configuration, Running tinc, Installation, Top
+@chapter Configuration
 
 @menu
-* Multiple networks::           
-* How connections work::        
-* Configuration file::          
-* Example::                     
+* Configuration introduction::
+* Multiple networks::
+* How connections work::
+* Configuration files::
+* Generating keypairs::
+* Network interfaces::
+* Example configuration::
 @end menu
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Multiple networks, How connections work, Configuring tinc, Configuring tinc
-@section Multiple networks
+@node    Configuration introduction, Multiple networks, Configuration, Configuration
+@section Configuration introduction
+
+Before actually starting to configure tinc and editing files,
+make sure you have read this entire section so you know what to expect.
+Then, make it clear to yourself how you want to organize your VPN:
+What are the nodes (computers running tinc)?
+What IP addresses/subnets do they have?
+What is the network mask of the entire VPN?
+Do you need special firewall rules?
+Do you have to set up masquerading or forwarding rules?
+Do you want to run tinc in router mode or switch mode?
+These questions can only be answered by yourself,
+you will not find the answers in this documentation.
+Make sure you have an adequate understanding of networks in general.
+@cindex Network Administrators Guide
+A good resource on networking is the
+@uref{http://www.linuxdoc.org/LDP/nag2/, Linux Network Administrators Guide}.
+
+If you have everything clearly pictured in your mind,
+proceed in the following order:
+First, generate the configuration files (@file{tinc.conf}, your host configuration file, @file{tinc-up} and perhaps @file{tinc-down}).
+Then generate the keypairs.
+Finally, distribute the host configuration files.
+These steps are described in the subsections below.
 
-@c from the manpage
 
-It is perfectly OK for you to run more than one tinc daemon.
-However, in its default form, you will soon notice that you can't use
-two different configuration files without the -c option.
+@c ==================================================================
+@node    Multiple networks, How connections work, Configuration introduction, Configuration
+@section Multiple networks
+
+@cindex multiple networks
+@cindex netname
+In order to allow you to run more than one tinc daemon on one computer,
+for instance if your computer is part of more than one VPN,
+you can assign a ``netname'' to your VPN.
+It is not required if you only run one tinc daemon,
+it doesn't even have to be the same on all the sites of your VPN,
+but it is recommended that you choose one anyway.
 
-We have thought of another way of dealing with this: network names. This
-means that you call tincd with the -n argument, which will assign a name
-to this daemon.
+We will asume you use a netname throughout this document.
+This means that you call tincd with the -n argument,
+which will assign a netname to this daemon.
 
 The effect of this is that the daemon will set its configuration
-``root'' to /etc/tinc/nn/, where nn is your argument to the -n
-option. You'll notice that it appears in syslog as ``tinc.nn''.
+``root'' to @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/, where @var{netname} is your argument to the -n
+option.  You'll notice that it appears in syslog as ``tinc.@var{netname}''.
 
 However, it is not strictly necessary that you call tinc with the -n
-option. In this case, the network name would just be empty, and it will
-be used as such. tinc now looks for files in /etc/tinc/, instead of
-/etc/tinc/nn/; the configuration file should be /etc/tinc/tinc.conf,
-and the passphrases are now expected to be in /etc/tinc/passphrases/.
+option.  In this case, the network name would just be empty, and it will
+be used as such.  tinc now looks for files in @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/, instead of
+@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/; the configuration file should be @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/tinc.conf,
+and the host configuration files are now expected to be in @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/hosts/.
 
 But it is highly recommended that you use this feature of tinc, because
-it will be so much clearer whom your daemon talks to. Hence, we will
+it will be so much clearer whom your daemon talks to.  Hence, we will
 assume that you use it.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    How connections work, Configuration file, Multiple networks, Configuring tinc
+@node    How connections work, Configuration files, Multiple networks, Configuration
 @section How connections work
 
-Before going on, first a bit on how tinc sees connections.
-
-When tinc starts up, it reads in the configuration file and parses the
-command-line options. If it sees a `ConnectTo' value in the file, it
-will try to connect to it, on the given port. If this fails, tinc exits.
+When tinc starts up, it parses the command-line options and then
+reads in the configuration file tinc.conf.
+If it sees one or more  `ConnectTo' values pointing to other tinc daemons in that file,
+it will try to connect to those other daemons.
+Whether this succeeds or not and whether `ConnectTo' is specified or not,
+tinc will listen for incoming connection from other deamons.
+If you did specify a `ConnectTo' value and the other side is not responding,
+tinc will keep retrying.
+This means that once started, tinc will stay running until you tell it to stop,
+and failures to connect to other tinc daemons will not stop your tinc daemon
+for trying again later.
+This means you don't have to intervene if there are temporary network problems.
+
+@cindex client
+@cindex server
+There is no real distinction between a server and a client in tinc.
+If you wish, you can view a tinc daemon without a `ConnectTo' value as a server,
+and one which does specify such a value as a client.
+It does not matter if two tinc daemons have a `ConnectTo' value pointing to each other however.
 
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Configuration file, Example, How connections work, Configuring tinc
-@section Configuration file
+@node    Configuration files, Generating keypairs, How connections work, Configuration
+@section Configuration files
 
 The actual configuration of the daemon is done in the file
-@file{/etc/tinc/nn/tinc.conf}.
+@file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc.conf} and at least one other file in the directory
+@file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/}.
 
-This file consists of comments (lines started with a #) or assignments
+These file consists of comments (lines started with a #) or assignments
 in the form of
 
 @example
@@ -645,136 +868,431 @@ Variable = Value.
 @end example
 
 The variable names are case insensitive, and any spaces, tabs, newlines
-and carriage returns are ignored. Note: it is not required that you put
+and carriage returns are ignored.  Note: it is not required that you put
 in the `=' sign, but doing so improves readability.  If you leave it
 out, remember to replace it with at least one space character.
 
+In this section all valid variables are listed in alphabetical order.
+The default value is given between parentheses,
+other comments are between square brackets.
+
 @menu
-* Variables::                   
+* Main configuration variables::
+* Host configuration variables::
+* Scripts::
+* How to configure::
 @end menu
 
+
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Variables,  , Configuration file, Configuration file
-@subsection Variables
+@node       Main configuration variables, Host configuration variables, Configuration files, Configuration files
+@subsection Main configuration variables
 
-Here are all valid variables, listed in alphabetical order. The default
-value, required or optional is given between parentheses.
+@table @asis
+@cindex AddressFamily
+@item @var{AddressFamily} = <ipv4|ipv6|any> (any)
+This option affects the address family of listening and outgoing sockets.
+If "any" is selected, then depending on the operating system
+both IPv4 and IPv6 or just IPv6 listening sockets will be created.
+
+@cindex BindToAddress
+@item @var{BindToAddress} = <address> [experimental]
+If your computer has more than one IPv4 or IPv6 address, tinc
+will by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.
+It is possible to bind only to a single address with this variable.
+
+This option may not work on all platforms.
+
+@cindex BindToInterface
+@item @var{BindToInterface} = <interface> [experimental]
+If you have more than one network interface in your computer, tinc will
+by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.  It is
+possible to bind tinc to a single interface like eth0 or ppp0 with this
+variable.
+
+This option may not work on all platforms.
+
+@cindex ConnectTo
+@item @var{ConnectTo} = <name>
+Specifies which other tinc daemon to connect to on startup.
+Multiple ConnectTo variables may be specified,
+in which case outgoing connections to each specified tinc daemon are made.
+The names should be known to this tinc daemon
+(i.e., there should be a host configuration file for the name on the ConnectTo line).
+
+If you don't specify a host with ConnectTo,
+tinc won't try to connect to other daemons at all,
+and will instead just listen for incoming connections.
+
+@cindex Device
+@item @var{Device} = <device> (@file{/dev/tap0}, @file{/dev/net/tun} or other depending on platform)
+The virtual network device to use.
+tinc will automatically detect what kind of device it is.
+Note that you can only use one device per daemon.
+Under Windows, use @var{Interface} instead of @var{Device}.
+Note that you can only use one device per daemon.
+See also @ref{Device files}.
+
+@cindex Hostnames
+@item @var{Hostnames} = <yes|no> (no)
+This option selects whether IP addresses (both real and on the VPN)
+should be resolved.  Since DNS lookups are blocking, it might affect
+tinc's efficiency, even stopping the daemon for a few seconds everytime
+it does a lookup if your DNS server is not responding.
+
+This does not affect resolving hostnames to IP addresses from the
+configuration file.
+
+@cindex Interface
+@item @var{Interface} = <interface>
+Defines the name of the interface corresponding to the virtual network device.
+Depending on the operating system and the type of device this may or may not actually set the name of the interface.
+Under Windows, this variable is used to select which network interface will be used.
+If you specified a Device, this variable is almost always already correctly set.
+
+@cindex Mode
+@item @var{Mode} = <router|switch|hub> (router)
+This option selects the way packets are routed to other daemons.
 
-@c straight from the manpage
 @table @asis
-@item ConnectPort = <port> (655)
-Connect to the upstream host (given with the ConnectTo directive) on
-port port. port may be given in decimal (default), octal (when preceded
-by a single zero) or hexadecimal (prefixed with 0x).  port is the port
-number for both the UDP and the TCP (meta) connections.
-
-@item ConnectTo = <IP address|hostname> (optional)
-Specifies which host to connect to on startup. Multiple ConnectTo variables
-may be specified, if connecting to the first one fails then tinc will try
-the next one, and so on. It is possible to specify hostnames for dynamic IP
-addresses (like those given on dyndns.org), tinc will not cache the resolved
-IP address.
-
-If you don't specify a host with ConnectTo, regardless of whether a
-value for ConnectPort is given, tinc won't connect at all, and will
-instead just listen for incoming connections.
-
-@item Hostnames = <yes|no> (no)
-This option selects whether IP addresses (both real and on the VPN) should
-be resolved. Since DNS lookups are blocking, it might affect tinc's
-efficiency, even stopping the daemon for a few seconds everytime it does
-a lookup if your DNS server is not responding.
-
-This does not affect resolving hostnames to IP addresses from the configuration
-file.
-
-@item IndirectData = <yes|no> (no)
-This option specifies whether other tinc daemons besides the one you
-specified with ConnectTo can make a direct connection to you. This is
-especially useful if you are behind a firewall and it is impossible
-to make a connection from the outside to your tinc daemon. Otherwise,
-it is best to leave this option out or set it to no.
-
-@item Interface = <device> (optional)
-If you have more than one network interface in your computer, tinc will by
-default listen on all of them for incoming connections. It is possible to
-bind tinc to a single interface like eth0 or ppp0 with this variable.
-
-@item InterfaceIP = <local address> (optional)
-If your computer has more than one IP address on a single interface (for example
-if you are running virtual hosts), tinc will by default listen on all of them for
-incoming connections. It is possible to bind tinc to a single IP address with
-this variable. It is still possible to listen on several interfaces at the same
-time though, if they share the same IP address.
-
-@item KeyExpire = <seconds> (3600)
+@cindex router
+@item router
+In this mode Subnet
+variables in the host configuration files will be used to form a routing table.
+Only unicast packets of routable protocols (IPv4 and IPv6) are supported in this mode.
+
+This is the default mode, and unless you really know you need another mode, don't change it.
+
+@cindex switch
+@item switch
+In this mode the MAC addresses of the packets on the VPN will be used to
+dynamically create a routing table just like an Ethernet switch does.
+Unicast, multicast and broadcast packets of every protocol that runs over Ethernet are supported in this mode
+at the cost of frequent broadcast ARP requests and routing table updates.
+
+This mode is primarily useful if you want to bridge Ethernet segments.
+
+@cindex hub
+@item hub
+This mode is almost the same as the switch mode, but instead
+every packet will be broadcast to the other daemons
+while no routing table is managed.
+@end table
+
+@cindex KeyExpire
+@item @var{KeyExpire} = <seconds> (3600)
 This option controls the time the encryption keys used to encrypt the data
-are valid. It is common practice to change keys at regular intervals to
+are valid.  It is common practice to change keys at regular intervals to
 make it even harder for crackers, even though it is thought to be nearly
 impossible to crack a single key.
 
-@item ListenPort = <port> (655)
-Listen on local port port. The computer connecting to this daemon should
-use this number as the argument for his ConnectPort.
+@cindex MACExpire
+@item @var{MACExpire} = <seconds> (600)
+This option controls the amount of time MAC addresses are kept before they are removed.
+This only has effect when Mode is set to "switch".
 
-@item MyOwnVPNIP = <local address[/maskbits]> (required)
-The local address is the number that the daemon will propagate to
-other daemons on the network when it is identifying itself. Hence this
-will be the file name of the passphrase file that the other end expects
-to find the passphrase in.
+@cindex Name
+@item @var{Name} = <name> [required]
+This is a symbolic name for this connection.  It can be anything
 
-The local address is the IP address of the tap device, not the real IP
-address of the host running tincd. Due to changes in recent kernels, it
-is also necessary that you make the ethernet (also known as MAC) address
-equal to the IP address (see the example).
+@cindex PingTimeout
+@item @var{PingTimeout} = <seconds> (60)
+The number of seconds of inactivity that tinc will wait before sending a
+probe to the other end.  If that other end doesn't answer within that
+same amount of seconds, the connection is terminated, and the others
+will be notified of this.
 
-maskbits is the number of bits set to 1 in the netmask part.
+@cindex PriorityInheritance
+@item @var{PriorityInheritance} = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
+When this option is enabled the value of the TOS field of tunneled IPv4 packets
+will be inherited by the UDP packets that are sent out.
 
-@item MyVirtualIP = <local address[/maskbits]>
-This is an alias for MyOwnVPNIP.
+@cindex PrivateKey
+@item @var{PrivateKey} = <key> [obsolete]
+This is the RSA private key for tinc. However, for safety reasons it is
+advised to store private keys of any kind in separate files. This prevents
+accidental eavesdropping if you are editting the configuration file.
 
-@item Passphrases = <directory> (/etc/tinc/NETNAME/passphrases)
-The directory where tinc will look for passphrases when someone tries to
-connect. Please see the manpage for genauth(8) for more information
-about passphrases as used by tinc.
+@cindex PrivateKeyFile
+@item @var{PrivateKeyFile} = <path> (@file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/rsa_key.priv})
+This is the full path name of the RSA private key file that was
+generated by ``tincd --generate-keys''.  It must be a full path, not a
+relative directory.
 
-@item PingTimeout = <seconds> (5)
-The number of seconds of inactivity that tinc will wait before sending a
-probe to the other end. If that other end doesn't answer within that
-same amount of seconds, the connection is terminated, and the others
-will be notified of this.
+Note that there must be exactly one of @var{PrivateKey}
+or @var{PrivateKeyFile}
+specified in the configuration file.
+
+@end table
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Host configuration variables, Scripts, Main configuration variables, Configuration files
+@subsection Host configuration variables
+
+@table @asis
+@cindex Address
+@item @var{Address} = <IP address|hostname> [recommended]
+This variable is only required if you want to connect to this host.  It
+must resolve to the external IP address where the host can be reached,
+not the one that is internal to the VPN.
+
+@cindex Cipher
+@item @var{Cipher} = <cipher> (blowfish)
+The symmetric cipher algorithm used to encrypt UDP packets.
+Any cipher supported by OpenSSL is recognized.
+
+@cindex Compression
+@item @var{Compression} = <level> (0)
+This option sets the level of compression used for UDP packets.
+Possible values are 0 (off), 1 (fast zlib) and any integer up to 9 (best zlib),
+10 (fast lzo) and 11 (best lzo).
+
+@cindex Digest
+@item @var{Digest} = <digest> (sha1)
+The digest algorithm used to authenticate UDP packets.
+Any digest supported by OpenSSL is recognized.
+Furthermore, specifying "none" will turn off packet authentication.
+
+@cindex IndirectData
+@item @var{IndirectData} = <yes|no> (no)
+This option specifies whether other tinc daemons besides the one you
+specified with ConnectTo can make a direct connection to you.  This is
+especially useful if you are behind a firewall and it is impossible to
+make a connection from the outside to your tinc daemon.  Otherwise, it
+is best to leave this option out or set it to no.
+
+@cindex MACLength
+@item @var{MACLength} = <length> (4)
+The length of the message authentication code used to authenticate UDP packets.
+Can be anything from 0
+up to the length of the digest produced by the digest algorithm.
+
+@cindex Port
+@item @var{Port} = <port> (655)
+This is the port this tinc daemon listens on.
+You can use decimal portnumbers or symbolic names (as listed in /etc/services).
+
+@cindex PublicKey
+@item @var{PublicKey} = <key> [obsolete]
+This is the RSA public key for this host.
+
+@cindex PublicKeyFile
+@item @var{PublicKeyFile} = <path> [obsolete]
+This is the full path name of the RSA public key file that was generated
+by ``tincd --generate-keys''.  It must be a full path, not a relative
+directory.
+
+@cindex PEM format
+From version 1.0pre4 on tinc will store the public key directly into the
+host configuration file in PEM format, the above two options then are not
+necessary. Either the PEM format is used, or exactly
+@strong{one of the above two options} must be specified
+in each host configuration file, if you want to be able to establish a
+connection with that host.
+
+@cindex Subnet
+@item @var{Subnet} = <address[/prefixlength]>
+The subnet which this tinc daemon will serve.
+tinc tries to look up which other daemon it should send a packet to by searching the appropiate subnet.
+If the packet matches a subnet,
+it will be sent to the daemon who has this subnet in his host configuration file.
+Multiple subnet lines can be specified for each daemon.
+
+Subnets can either be single MAC, IPv4 or IPv6 addresses,
+in which case a subnet consisting of only that single address is assumed,
+or they can be a IPv4 or IPv6 network address with a prefixlength.
+Shorthand notations are not supported.
+For example, IPv4 subnets must be in a form like 192.168.1.0/24,
+where 192.168.1.0 is the network address and 24 is the number of bits set in the netmask.
+Note that subnets like 192.168.1.1/24 are invalid!
+Read a networking HOWTO/FAQ/guide if you don't understand this.
+IPv6 subnets are notated like fec0:0:0:1:0:0:0:0/64.
+MAC addresses are notated like 0:1a:2b:3c:4d:5e.
+
+@cindex CIDR notation
+prefixlength is the number of bits set to 1 in the netmask part; for
+example: netmask 255.255.255.0 would become /24, 255.255.252.0 becomes
+/22. This conforms to standard CIDR notation as described in
+@uref{ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc1519.txt, RFC1519}
+
+@cindex TCPonly
+@item @var{TCPonly} = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
+If this variable is set to yes, then the packets are tunnelled over a
+TCP connection instead of a UDP connection.  This is especially useful
+for those who want to run a tinc daemon from behind a masquerading
+firewall, or if UDP packet routing is disabled somehow.
+Setting this options also implicitly sets IndirectData.
+@end table
+
+
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       Scripts, How to configure, Host configuration variables, Configuration files
+@subsection Scripts
+
+@cindex scripts
+Apart from reading the server and host configuration files,
+tinc can also run scripts at certain moments.
+On Windows (not Cygwin), the scripts should have the extension .bat.
+
+@table @file
+@cindex tinc-up
+@item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-up
+This is the most important script.
+If it is present it will be executed right after the tinc daemon has been
+started and has connected to the virtual network device.
+It should be used to set up the corresponding network interface,
+but can also be used to start other things.
+Under Windows you can use the Network Connections control panel instead of creating this script.
+
+@cindex tinc-down
+@item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-down
+This script is started right before the tinc daemon quits.
+
+@item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/@var{host}-up
+This script is started when the tinc daemon with name @var{host} becomes reachable.
+
+@item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/@var{host}-down
+This script is started when the tinc daemon with name @var{host} becomes unreachable.
+@end table
 
-@item TapDevice = <device> (/dev/tap0)
-The ethertap device to use. Note that you can only use one device per
-daemon. The info pages of the tinc package contain more information
-about configuring an ethertap device for Linux.
-
-@item TCPonly = <yes|no> (no, experimental)
-If this variable is set to yes, then the packets are tunnelled over a TCP
-connection instead of a UDP connection. This is especially useful for those
-who want to run a tinc daemon from behind a masquerading firewall, or if
-UDP packet routing is disabled somehow. This is experimental code,
-try this at your own risk.
-
-@item VpnMask = <mask> (optional)
-The mask that defines the scope of the entire VPN. This option is not used
-by the tinc daemon itself, but can be used by startup scripts to configure
-the ethertap devices correctly.
+@cindex environment variables
+The scripts are started without command line arguments,
+but can make use of certain environment variables.
+Under UNIX like operating systems the names of environment variables must be preceded by a $ in scripts.
+Under Windows, in @file{.bat} files, they have to be put between % signs.
+
+@table @env
+@cindex NETNAME
+@item NETNAME
+If a netname was specified, this environment variable contains it.
+
+@cindex NAME
+@item NAME
+Contains the name of this tinc daemon.
+
+@cindex DEVICE
+@item DEVICE
+Contains the name of the virtual network device that tinc uses.
+
+@cindex INTERFACE
+@item INTERFACE
+Contains the name of the virtual network interface that tinc uses.
+This should be used for commands like ifconfig.
+
+@cindex NODE
+@item NODE
+When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its name.
+
+@cindex REMOTEADDRESS
+@item REMOTEADDRESS
+When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its real address.
+
+@cindex REMOTEPORT
+@item REMOTEPORT
+When a host becomes (un)reachable,
+this is set to the port number it uses for communication with other tinc daemons.
 @end table
 
 
+@c ==================================================================
+@node       How to configure,  , Scripts, Configuration files
+@subsection How to configure
+
+@subsubheading Step 1.  Creating the main configuration file
+
+The main configuration file will be called @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc.conf}.
+Adapt the following example to create a basic configuration file:
+
+@example
+Name = @var{yourname}
+Device = @file{/dev/tap0}
+@end example
+
+Then, if you know to which other tinc daemon(s) yours is going to connect,
+add `ConnectTo' values.
+
+@subsubheading Step 2.  Creating your host configuration file
+
+If you added a line containing `Name = yourname' in the main configuarion file,
+you will need to create a host configuration file @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/yourname}.
+Adapt the following example to create a host configuration file:
+
+@example
+Address = your.real.hostname.org
+Subnet = 192.168.1.0/24
+@end example
+
+You can also use an IP address instead of a hostname.
+The `Subnet' specifies the address range that is local for @emph{your part of the VPN only}.
+If you have multiple address ranges you can specify more than one `Subnet'.
+You might also need to add a `Port' if you want your tinc daemon to run on a different port number than the default (655).
+
 
 @c ==================================================================
-@node    Example,  , Configuration file, Configuring tinc
-@section Example
+@node    Generating keypairs, Network interfaces, Configuration files, Configuration
+@section Generating keypairs
+
+@cindex key generation
+Now that you have already created the main configuration file and your host configuration file,
+you can easily create a public/private keypair by entering the following command:
 
+@example
+tincd -n @var{netname} -K
+@end example
+
+tinc will generate a public and a private key and ask you where to put them.
+Just press enter to accept the defaults.
 
-Imagine the following situation. An A-based company wants to connect
-three branch offices in B, C and D using the internet. All four offices
-have a 24/7 connection to the internet.
 
-A is going to serve as the center of the network. B and C will connect
-to A, and D will connect to C. Each office will be assigned their own IP
+@c ==================================================================
+@node    Network interfaces, Example configuration, Generating keypairs, Configuration
+@section Network interfaces
+
+Before tinc can start transmitting data over the tunnel, it&nb